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Full text of "Sponsor"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor53spon 



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magazine for Radio and TV advertisers 



12 JANUARY 1953 



50c per copy • $8 per year 



Fhe Proof of the Pudding . . . 



500 TV STATIONS: 
WHEN? COSTS? 

page 23 




Is in the leading-or so the JELL-O PUDDING and PIE FILLING box-top 
d 25-words-or-less contest indicates. 

mceived by Young & Rubicam for General Foods and aired in a spot cam- 
ign over 120 stations, the contest featured a slant that loaded the ether 
th sizzling pitches. To the disc-jockey that captured the greatest number 

entries according to market size and time cost went an expenses-paid 
cation in Paris for himself and wife! 

course KOWH's Sandy Jackson won— more proof that you can't do better 
an first place! And the Hooper averaged below for the fourteen-month 
■riod from October, 1951, to November, 1952, puts KOWH in undisputed 
st place— thanks to personalities like amiable Sandy. 



oV 



A> 



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w 



■ ■ 



What political sponsor- 
ship did for appliances 

page 32 




There's Nothing Better Than First Place! 




AVERAGE HOOPER 



[MS 



Special report on sales 
opportunities in Hawaii 
for air advertisers 










General Manager, Todd Storz; Represented Nationally By The BOILING CO. 



page 34 



Agencyman Smithson's 
verse to ease 
copywriter's curse 

page 37 






THf WHB. 9 MABXn All* 





CLUB 710— 

With "Oil" Wells as 

Master of Ceremonies 

His name is really Earl 
Wells — but a voice as 
smooth as oil, modulated 
to perfection — has earned 
him the nickname of 
"Oil." Monday through 
Friday, from 2 p.m. to 
4:45 p.m., "Oil" presents 
the latest popular records 
— and the old standard 
tunes. Two solid hours 
and 45 minutes of won- 
derful listening, with 
short, cryptic introduc- 
tions that make the pro- 
gram "mostly music." 
Each show features the 
"Top Twenty" tunes of 
the week, as reported by 
liillboard, Variety. Cash 
Box. a poll of local rec- 
ord shops, and the WHB 
Concensus. A wonderful 
time-segment for partici- 
pating announcements — 
"live" or minutes, trans- 
cribed. On one afternoon 
a week representatives of 
the leading phonograph 
record companies bring 
"Oil" their newest rec- 
ords ( never before heart] 
on the air in K 

—and present them 
personally for their 
"premiere" in the area. 








"WHB VARIETIES"— 

Radio's Answer to TV 

The finest music, brought to listeners 
as ONLY Radio can bring it! "You 
don't have to see it to enjoy it — just 
listen!" Variety is the keynote. Late 
records of leading recording ai 
(no jump) — plus fine albums in their 
entirety, plus entire musical coi 

tions! Observance of special mu- 
sical events, composers' birth 
movie preview music, special "days" 
and special "weeks." Nightly, M<> 
through Friday, for a full hour. The 
judgment in musical selection of Edna- 
lee Crouch (WHB's music librarian), 
plus the superb showmanship of Roch 
Ulmer, with his ready wit and glib 
tongue. Dignified sponsors with a 
dignified message will be welcomed 
on a participating schedule which al- 
lows only five commercials within the 
full-hour format. A premium spot for 
superior products! You'll see why 
it's "Radio's best night time buy!" 



W H B Neighborin' Tim. 

Advertisers who sell to the masses haw 
quick to ride herd with tins 
dinm , hours of noon 

time Saddh Soap Opera from 

I) K.im h the Cow < ountr) 
<lul> with iniisii li\ Don Sullivan 

ami Ins Western Band, and the coun 
us philosophy ol I>( t) Dyer. Brua 
(.lam i- mastei "t ceremonies, assisted 
l>\ hiv side-kick, Poke) Red. \l, Bud 
and i'i i« enliven the |>ioceedings with 
theii musical novelties and wisecracks. 
< hai uivcs the AP and local 

report .ii noon Itroadcast from 
2 pin daily, HUB 
i arries participating 
i minute transcriptions) 
ami sponsored quarter-hours. Ask for 
■ I u i ( k 1 y , before the 
*> K I noes up! 




I III K \ I I \ PROGF 

b ) iii/il | 

hold helps and appl 

kiinu tund 

spots on ilns si 

noun. 

by Sandra Lt< 



Ko< I 

Id and i 
with >er and h 

m the 

.,UI — o 

— brini: 

the 



nd 

I 




NBC girding 

for bigger 

TV program 

coups 



Agencymen 

speculate 

over NBC's 

changes 



Robert Hall 

revises 

media 

allocations 



DuMont blasts 

NCAA, yet 

gives time to 

its convention 



N. Y. teams 

welcome 

air-media 

inquiry 



Promotion of Frank White to NBC presidency is not expected to change 
RCA-NBC policy of pouring large sums into TV programing. Competitor 
networks are under impression RCA-NBC will not only continue this 
policy but embark on talent raiding ventu r es. One personality men- 
tioned as likely NBC raiding target, regardless of price, is Edward 
R. Murrow, who has been with CBS from start of his career in broad- 
casting. RCA President Frank Folsom, who swung Robert W. Sherwood 
playwriting deal for NBC TV, is expected to concern himself personal- 
ly with other strategic programing moves during 1953. 

--SR- 

Latest shift in NBC's official family has prompted this speculation 
among New York ad agencymen: Is ths spotting of Frank White, whose 
grounding has been thoroughly radio, to be taken as indication RCA 
powers have decided to make vigorous last effort to recapture radio 
leadership from CBS? Or, is the move the prelude to radical switch in 
sales policy, such as selling radio on basis of supplementary cover- 
age to TV hookup? 

-SR- 

Robert Hall Clothes, which spends around $2,000,000 in air media, is 
expanding TV comm i t m ents to perha p s as high as 20% of new budget. 
Regular TV schedules will turn out to be more at expense of newspapers 
than radio stations. Firm has what it thinks is surefire formula for 
use of TV by retail advertisers ; involves concentration on specials to 
produce immediate sales. This is same function delegated to news- 
papers, while radio is used mainly to stress firm's low overhead 
merchandising philosophy. Yale Shafer, with Neff-Rogow for past 8 
years, has joined Frank B. Sawdon agency to assist radio-TV v. p. 
Jerry Bess in handling expanded Robert Hall use of TV. 

~SR- 

Classic case of how a TV network doesn't let it s right hand interfere 
wit h wha t its left ha nd is doing : DuMont has maintained steady attack 
on NCAA for its policy of restricted football televising, but that 
didn't stay network from picking ur> 8 January presentation of Scripps- 
Howard award to Clarence "Biggie" Munn as football coach of year 
during NCAA annual convention. 

-SR- 

Officials of New York baseball clubs, all of whom have TV sponsors, 
have no qual ms a b out outcome of fa ct -finding inquir y into effect of 
radio and TV upon minor leagues' gate, as well as baseball in general. 
They think probe will tend to clear up some of what they regard as 
basically unfounded charges lodged against air media. Being minor 
league team owners themselves, New York clubs are interested in hav- 
ing facts on situation from another aspect: They have been turning 
down money from participation in radio network projects like "Game 
of the Day." Fact-finding group, appointed by Commissioner Ford 
Frick, consists of 4 major and 2 minor league representatives. 



sponsor. Volume 7. No. 1. 12 January liinn. Published biweekly bj SPONSOR Publications, Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore, Md. Executive, Editorial, Advertising, Circu- 
lation Offices S10 Madison Ave., New York 22 $8 a year in 1'. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1919 at Baltimore, Md. nostoflke under Act 3 March 1879 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 12 January 1933 



RCA Victor 

continuing 

3 net shows 



November 

out-of-home 

listening in N. Y. 

at record high 



Network 

opposition 

to fee TV 

looms 



An industry 

first: Pulse's 

injunction 

vs. Hooper 



Life hails 

civic pride 

via NBC TV's 

O&O stations 



CBS yields 

to Lord 

because of 

'Cangbusters" 



Clamorene 

looks like 

solid spot 

TV user 



RCA Victor's 1953 advertising campaign in behalf of its receivers 
includes a stand-pat policy for its ne twork (NBC) programs. It will 
continue to sponsor the Dennis Day and "Kukla, Fran & Ollie" shows 
in TV and the Phil Harris-Alice Faye shows in radio. 

-SR- 

Pulse reports out-of-home listening added 20.4% to New York radio 
audience during November 1952. Also out-of-home level of radio 
listening that month was higher t h an any previous November since Pulse 
started its out-of-home studies in 1949. How importantly this out- 
of-home, as well as multiple-set, listening will figure in 1953 re- 
search picture is related in article which starts page 28. 

-SR- 

TV networks are watching fee TV with keen interest. It's already 
strongly indicated there will be b itter opposition from the s e commer- 
cial TV interest s when FCC gets around to hearings on channel assign- 
ments and system selection for fee TV. Basic argument which networks 
are expected to advance is that any pay-as-you-look system is contrary 
to principle of free broadcasting to which whole system of American 
broadcasting is dedicated. Degree of interest in development of fee 
TV among banking circles may be measured by fact at least 2 financial 
houses are currently conducting inquiry on subject. 

-SR- 

For first time in history of radio 2 rating services are locked in 
court litigation. Pulse has obtained temporary injunction in N. Y. 
Supreme Court restraining C. E. Hooper from continuing to circulate 
letter which Pulse contended was " unfair competition." Argument cen- 
ters around letter which Hooper allegedly sent some stations and 
agencies in which he is said to have claimed certain agencies said 
they preferred his service over Pulse's. 

-SR- 

NI3C TV's 0&0 operation is launching 1953 with what is perhaps the 
b igg e st lo ca l commercial programing b reak medium has so far experi- 
enced. Jim Gaines, v. p. in charge of NBC O&O's, has sold Life maga- 
zine on idea of doing series of weekly half-hour programs dedicated to 
spotlighting civic achievements in 5 cities in which network operates 
own stations. Other scheduled markets to participate in idea are 
Detroit and Philadelphia, via WWJ-TV and WPTZ, respectively. Both 
are NBC affiliates. 

-SR- 

CBS TV preferred not to give Phillips H. Lord legal battle over his 
claim that network's "Everywhere I Go" is copy of "We the People," 
which Lord owns. One reason: CBS is very much interested in making 
deal wit h Lor d f or his "Gangb ust ers" which Chesterfield recently can- 
celled on NBC TV. CBS has therefore shelved "Everywhere I Go." 

-SR- 

Glamorene, rug cleaner, which recently switched from J. Walter Thomp- 
son to R & R, is expected to swing heavil y int o spot TV. Product has 
been making rapid strides in its field and indications are it will be 
budgeting better than $600,000 for advertising during 1953. 



SPONSOR 




+F? 



HP 

■■■> 



n 



i 



i 



Local and regional advertisers! You can now 
enlist the dramatic appeal of George Raft to help 
sell for you, exclusively, in your own market. 
Skillfully written, superbly performed — these 
action-filled films bring a new intensity to 
television entertainment.. For availability in your 
market, cost, audition screenings . . . contact 
the nearest MCA-TV office. 



/%k^^? M\ 



another advertising SHOWCASE by gi JHQfr JV ! 



NEW YORK: 598 Madison Avenue- PLaza 9-7500 

CHICAGO: 430 North Michigan Ave.— DEIaware 7-1100 

BEVERLY HILLS: 9370 Santa Monica Blvd.-CRestview 6-2001 

SAN FRANCISCO: 105 Montgomery Street-EXbrook 2-8922 

CLEVELAND: Union Commerce Bldg.-CHerry 1-6010 

DALLAS: 2102 North Akard Street -CENtral 1448 

DETROIT: 1612 Book Tower -WOodward 2-2604 

BOSTON: 1044 Little Building -Liberty 2-4823 

IEAPOLIS: Northwestern Bank Bldg.-LINcoln 7863 



££&£ 



advertisers use 



12 January 1 
Volume 7 hi 



ARTICLES 



500 TV stations: how major agencies see picture 

Predictions by admen for TV's rapid burgeoning include: Cost of half-hour drama 
on full network may hit $2,500,000 to $3,000,000 by 1955; U. S. families TV 
covers may reach 80% by 1955: in December 1953 there may be 23,500,000 TV 
homes in 164 largest U. S. markets. More than mere crystal-ball gazing, these are 
well thought out projections intended as guidance for ad planners 

Sundial saturation howls 'em over 

New England shoe company switched from costly TV kid show to saturation 
spot radio campaign. With sales moving up, radio gets major share of budget 

Will 1953 he radio's big fact-finding near? 

There may be a record crop of research p.ojscts upcomhq. A-iong vSem: the 
ARF's study of ratinq services which rolls into hiqh qear this month; BAB's ex- 
pansion nf ARBI studies on radio vs. newspaper effectiveness; several studies 
designed to implement techniques for counting muliiple-set audience 

How to demonstrate a girdle on TV 

Sarong undergarment firm was faced with a p-oblem when it decided to use TV; 
how to get its demonstration commercials cleared by TV stations. A bright 
idea in trick protoqraphy led to an onqinal and tasteful approach 

What puiitieal sponsorship did for appliances 

"Normd" summer slump in appliance sales never came as result of convention 
sponsorship which reached nine out of 10 radio ar.d TV homes. Here are details 
on wliut applici'.ce firm- now say of polirical spo'.sorship results plus most com- 
plete report yet assembled on number of homes tuning in 

llbff radio is strong in Hawaiian Islands 

Radio is only medium which covers al' nine inhabited islands of Hawaii. It's a 



market well worth shooting at, has half-million population — greater than that 
four U. S. states. Gross business in 1951 was $1,367,000,000 



>f 



23 



26 



28 



30 



32 



31 



37 



Commercial couplets for '53 

From Cincinnati agencyman Lloyd Smithson, sone verce on copy cliches designed 
to put commercial writers in the mood for the new year 



COM I NG 



JForet^n-fancfiiaae broadcasting todag 

List of advertisers usinq radio beamed at foreign-lanqusqe qroups is growing. 
Foreiqn lanquaqe broedcr.ie's aie keopinq up with ?' e times: They now fashion 
s!,o\/s for soccn J-c;c;e.'ut!on Americans, using English scltcd with the o!d tonque 

2 fi .lanuarg 
6 icags to hill a TV commercial 

Picture story will give you quick point-by-point rundown on faults in TV com- 
me.cials with some pos : tive suggestions from a veteran Chicago adman 

2(i Jtinuurg 
Shell Chemicttl needs I'lexihilitg 

How this major farm insecticide seller uses radio to get its messages to farmers 
at just the riqht moment should be of interest to all admen who have problems 
with timing. Shell can get messages on the air within 48 hours after receiving 
reports of an insect plague or change in planting schedule 



DEPARTMENTS 



MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

510 MADISON 

MR. SPONSOR, C. E. Doolin 

NEW AND RENEW 

P. S. 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

RADIO RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

AGENCY PROFILE, C. Rinrod 

WHAT'S NEW IN RESEARCH 

ROUND-UP 

INTERNATIONAL REPORT 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor & President; Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Gle 

Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 

Managing Edi'or: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfied J. 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, E 

Konrad 

Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President - Advertising: Norman K.1 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Co 

(Western Manager), George Weiss (Tr 

ing Representative, Chicago Office), M 

Cooper (New Yo4 Office), John A. Kov, 

(Production Manaqer), Cynthia Soley, 

McCormack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusro bheo ■■• 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



*Hann, 
-■:- 'A 

m 

ii|»W) 



Published biweekly id sponsor publicaiions 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circulation 
Advertising Offices: Tilt) .Madison Are., New Yon 



Wt,S« 



<i . i»i ., Now Yor 
V V Telephone: MTrrsy Hill N 2772. Chicago 
liil IS. Grand Ave.. Suae 110. Telepnune: SI perlor 7 
West Coast (Mire: iinx7 Sunset Boulevard. Los Ar< I 
Telephone: Hillside hii,S9. Printing Office: 311W ,J J1 
Ave.. Baltimore II. \ld. subscriptions: United I 
$8 a year Canada and foreign $9. Single copied 
Pilnted In V S. A. Address ail correspondence i 
Mar)l«nr Wnue New York 22. N.Y \Urrav Hill «' 
Copyright 1958 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 



■fyik 
ft 



More Leading Jobbers 



in Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas 



. HODGE, Vice-President, 
nal Automotive Maintenance 
iation, 
eport, SAYS: 

/KH produces 
■nomenal results" 




HANNA, General Manager, 
:ss-Hanna, Inc. 

. eport, SAYS: 

7 KH is uniformly 
is factory" 




WILLIAMS, Owner, 
jms Physicians and Surgeons 
Co., 
Irteport, SAYS: 

prescribe 




Praise 
KWKH 



X he comments at the left are from letters written us 
by three leading jobbers in the KWKH area — men 
who know this region as well as you know your own 
front yard. 

None of these men would qualify generally as a "Time 
Buyer" or "Media Director". Some of them may never 
have seen Madison or Michigan Avenue. But all of 
them are experts on their own business, and on the 
direct, obvious impact on sales produced by KWKH! 

We're naturally proud of our successful advertising 
record in behalf of so many wholesalers, jobbers and 
distributors in the KWKH area. We'd like to do the 
same kind of job for yours. What facts would you like? 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 

Texas 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 



Arkansas 



Henry Clay, General Manager 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 




that's what 



Baton Rouge likes 
about the South' s 

WJBO 

Advertisers like it too because it's 
one more flower in the audience- 
building bouquets earned by 
WJBO. Our 'Max World of 
Sports" has been heard at the 
same time for the past 13 years; 
our Sports Director does three 
shows weekly on fishing, hunting 
and outdoor activities. The L.S.U. 
football games, sponsored by the 
Ethyl Corp., were fed to a La. 
network this year; we regularly 
carry play-by-play reports of all 
important local and national 
spoiling events, including the 
Rose and Cotton Bowl games. 
Programming like this, added to 
our NBC affiliation, attract the 
market's largest audience. 

It's a market to turn your head 
South- -with population up 257% 
in a decade of dynamic progress. 
Reach it via WJBO. 



watt affiliate in Baton Rouge, La. 




AFFILIATED WITH THE STATE-TIMES AND MORNING ADVOCATB 
FURTHER DATA FROM OUR NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 




Robert J. Landry 



Get yourself a franchise 

In American business, the "franchise" is the payoff. Once the 
word signified "a particular privilege or right granted by a sov- 
ereign." During the days of political plunderbund it often had a 
bad smell via street car franchises granted by aldermen and mayors 
"in perpetuity" and in an atmosphere of bribe and corruption. But 
today something quite different is typically implied when business- 
men — and advertising men — speak of a "franchise." They are think- 
ing of a product or service which has been established with the pub- 
lic, and with retailers, and which presumably is good for an in- 
definite period of profit-producing operation. 



Consumer franchises are national, regional, local. They may range 
from baked beans New England style out of Boston to baked beans 
cowboy style out of Denver. They include worldwide systems a la 
Coca-Cola. But large or small, venerable or recent, the "franchise" 
depends both for its original establishment and its subsequent market 
firmness upon advertising. This was true well before the dawn of 
broadcasting as witness these historic advertising appropriations for 
Kellogg's Corn Flakes: 1906, $90,000; 1907, $295,000; 1908, $450,- 
000; 1909, $525,000; 1910, $600,000. 



Bear in mind that these Kellogg figures were far more significant 
before 1910 than similar appropriations would be today. Will Kel- 
logg started in January 1906 with $35,000 capital. Yet note his 
confidence in the power of advertising in that he spent $90,000 the 
first year. Dry cereals were as much a novelty then as chlorophyll 
was in 1952. 



Jump now to the other day's New York Times. Two items in the 
same paper vividly illustrate the difference between sheer personal 
energy as a producer of profit and a hot "franchise." First, the death 
of an amazing British writer, Margaret Gabrielle Long, at the age 
of 64. She was what is known as "prolific" and wrote under a 
variety of noms de plume. Nobody knows exactly how many books 
she wrote or how many names she used but her output has been 
calculated under these names: as Marjorie Brown. 67 novels; as 
George Preedy. 23 novels, seven biographies, and two plays; as 
Joseph Shearing, 15 novels; under her own name, one book, her own 
story. This "money" writer, far more successful than the average, 
leaves to her heirs only such vague values as maj inhere in her 
copyrights. What a profit contrast with the story, reported that same 
day, of Clinton Foods. 

* * « 

Clinton Foods, the corporate name for Snow Crop and other 
products, reports profits 206$ above fiscal 1951. After paying 
(Please turn to page 7 ( >i 



SPONSOR 





The Man in the Blue Chambray Shirt 



We see by the New Yorker that some fellow who 
makes shirts has 279 of them, mostly colored, 
and that he would rather be caught reading the Daily 
Worker than have anyone see him in a white shirt be- 
fore sundown. 

We know 279 fellows who are in complete sartorial 
agreement with him. They have one kind of shirt — a 
5i/ 2 -ounce blue chambray, usually worn buttoned to 
the top without necktie — which goes on at sunrise. By 
sundown it has been replaced by a fleece-lined long- 
sleeved pull-over (familiar to the cognoscenti as a win- 
ter undershirt) . Yet, gentle reader, these men are im- 
peccably well-dressed, especially when they visit the 
bank to throw another crop check in the hopper. 
They're Iowa farmers, of the group that raised, among 



other things, 685,736,000 bushels of corn last year, 
6,754,000 tons of hay and 3,415,000 turkeys. 

They owned 17,307,402 acres of farm land, operated 
another 17,407,144 acres, purchased 35,8-11 pieces of 
new power machinery last year (bringing the total on 
Iowa farms to 485,068)', produced 6,392,238.0(10 
pounds of farm livestock, and (with the help of their 
chickens) five billion eggs. 

These blue-shirted capitalists had $2,125,000,000 in 
hum income last year, enough to buy all the sliiiiN 
they want — and practically anything else you have to 
sell. Next time you are in the market lor markets, ask 
the Katz man to show you some W Ml patterns, cus- 
tom-tailored to the 5i/2-ounce chambray set. In New 
York, telephone PLaza 9-4460. WMT, Cedar Rapids, 
600 kc, 5,000 watts, Basic CBS Network. 



competition 
got you 
at 

SEA? 




;:.'^" 



Relax . . . 
use CKAC 
Montreal 



1 . Huge coverage — 2 out of 
3 French radio homes in 
Quebec. 

2. Hundreds of thousands of 
faithful listeners day and 
night, as reported by 
B.B.M. 

3. Selling power second to 
none — over 7,500,000 
box tops in 1952. 

CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CEAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

Omer Renaud & Co. — Toronto 



Madison 

ODE TO TIMEBUYERS 

Would it be possible to obtain up to 
five copies of your article entitled, 
"Timebuvers: underpaid, underplayed, 
overworked," that appeared in the is- 
sue of November 19, 1951? 

If any charge, please bill me here at 
the agency. 

In writing you, I should mention 
that I find your feature articles devoted 
to how to go about approaching the 
Negro or Mexican markets, for in- 
stance, to be very valuable. Even if 
not considering such a market. I find 
this the type of material that is cut out 
and stowed away for future reference. 
Alex West 
Radio-TV Director 
Rhoades & Davis Advertising 
San Francisco 



INTERNATIONAL REPORT 

We have regretted not seeing more 
articles and information of interest to 
international media buyers. We de- 
cided to take a trial subscription to 
SPONSOR on the strength of the Inter- 
national Basics contained in the Fall 
Facts issue, and we hoped that such 
information would be a part of every 
issue of sponsor. We have welcomed 
the International Report to Sponsors 
section and we hope that in the future 
your publication will contain articles 
of interest to foreign as well as domes- 
tic advertisers. 

We will be glad to send you any 
radio or television news which we 
might have for use in International 
Report. 

W. D. Ravdin 

Advertising Department 

Smith Kline & French lnt'1 Co. 

Philadelphia 

• Besides International Basics published in I I 
July 1952 is-!:,-. Canadian section published II 
Vngusl l".%2. and International Report in Spon- 
sors carried in each i^ur since <> October 1*>.'»2, 
SPONSOR lias additional articles planned for 
international radio, foreign I'V. notable sponsors 
abroad, export agencies ami foreign agencies con- 
centrating on radio and TV. < S«-<- page -'t 1 for 

status report on Hawaii.) 



your December 1 issue. 

It is very comprehensive and gives 
an excellent insight into what the many 
radio stations throughout the country 
are offering to their advertisers. I 
realize this will not be the only re- 
quest of its kind, but in line with 
others I would be extremely anxious 
to know on what basis the various sta- 
tions were selected. For many years 
WMPS in Memphis has had an active 
and separate merchandising depart- 
ment and we feel have rendered a mer- 
chandising service in line with, or su- 
perior, to many of those stations fea- 
tured in your December write-up. 

I realize it is too late to do anything 
about this article but in the future I 
would greatly appreciate the opportu- 
nity to send you whatever material you 
may request or whatever stories vou 
may need to prepare another article 
in radio station merchandising. 

William B. Rudner 
V.P. and Director 
WMPS 
Memphis, Tenn. 

• SPONSOR'S selection of stations for its re. 
cent study of radio station merchandising de- 
pended on two factors: (1) the location of te- 
station in order to get a widespread geographic 

sampling of the U.S. and Canada; and (2) the 
type of merchandising done by the station^— in 
order to show a wide range of different station 
approaches to merchandising. This was no easy 
task for SPONSOR editors; many excellent radio 
station merchandising campaigns could not be cov- 
ered in the report because they coincided too 
closely with cither the location or methods of 
previously selected stations. 



MERCHANDISING SECTION 

I would like to offer my congratu- 
lations on the outstanding story of the 
merchandising problem featured in 



FARM RADIO 

I'd like to tell you about an idea that 
I've had for years which I think is 
going to mature in time for spring 
business. I've talked this over with the 
leading farm broadcasters of the North- 
east and they and their management 
agree it will be good for farm radio. 
We plan to assemble coverage, rates, 
audience surveys, success stories, etc., 
on farm programs in the Northeast in- 
to one brochure so that national ad- 
vertisers can purchase the whole North- 
east or regions within it to get their 
sales message over by radio. 

We are meeting in Harrisburg, Pa., 
at the big Farm Trade Show on Jan- 
uary 29th tentatively to compile these 
facts and appoint a committee to pre- 
pare the brochure. 

This is the first time that stations 
who are more or less competing are get- 
ting together on an enterprise this big. 

Fd Slusarczyk 

Farm Director 

WIBX 

Utica 



SPONSOR 



interested 




in selective 

or full 

( 

coverage 
for your 



TV program? 



you can do 

better with SPOT— 

much better 




When you buy on a Spot basis, it's easier to fit your TV program 
coverage to your sales situations. With Spot, you choose only the 
markets you wish ... as many as you need, or as few — and find that 
stations clear time more readily. You enjoy uniform and pleasing 
picture quality through film, and save enough on Spot time charges 
to cover film prints, their distribution and other costs. 

Get the full details from your Katz representative. 

H E lm AT A /» \J t PI V II , INC • National Advertising Representatives 

488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA • DALLAS • KANSAS CITY • DETROIT 



12 JANUARY 1953 




AUKEE 



ONE OF 

INDEPENDENT 
RADIO STATIONS ! 

GREATER TUAN EVER 
EN 1952 



t 



WEMP 



Largest Volume of Business 
in 16 Years. 



456 Satisfied Customers .. . 
87 National Advertisers 
. . . Consistent Renewals 

Constant Hooper Ratings 
. . . Among Top Five In- 
dies in Nation 

Provides up to 2Vz Times 
Net Stations' Audience Per 
Dollar 

Top Air Personalities . . . 
Air Salesmen . . . Merchan- 
dising That Moves 

All Major Milwaukee and 
Wisconsin Sports 

Round the Clock News 
Staff . . . Strong Commu- 
nity Affairs Voice 



WEMP-FM 



HOURS OF MUSIC, NEWS, SPORTS 

HUGH BOICE, JR., Gen. .Mgr. 
HEADLEY-REED, Not'l Rep. 




iripiiw 



C. E. Doolin 

President 
The Frito Co. 



Twenty years ago, C. E. Doolin teamed up with his brother. Earl, 
and his mother, Daisy, to manufacture their first Fritos in the Doolin 
family kitchen in San Antonio. An old potato ricer with a converted 
slotted bottom to squeeze through the corn dough into a cooking 
skillet was the first piece of equipment of the newly formed Frito Co. 

Sensing success with their first hand-produced product, Doolin 
bought himself some local radio spots in San Antonio to acquaint 
the public with the new corn chip product. His first radio copy was 
of the teaser type, which told little about the product but stressed 
its catchy name, Fritos. 

The Frito Co. now has 22 plants scattered throughout the United 
States, Hawaii, and Venezuela, and with an annual sales volume 
running into the millions. Twelve plants have licensee-owners, while 
the parent company owns or controls the other 10. 

As the business expanded, Doolin increased his advertising pro- 
gram, with radio as a major medium, and he was one of the first in 
television. He has also used radio to build community interest in 
openings of new Fritos plants through "on the s«ene"' programs. 

Radio's role, as Doolin puts it, is this: "A heavy radio campaign 
in a new market stimulates the curiosity of potential customers, 
persuades them to try the product. We follow up with recipes and 
suggestions for use which keep sales moving upward." 

Radio commercials for Fritos are generally live, announcer-read 
spots, with emphasis on straight selling copy which describes the 
product and its uses. Some singing commercials have been used. 
For television, advertising material is both filmed commercially 
and used live. Radio and TV stations in the Southwest air Fritos 
regularly in the parent company territory, and in other parts of the 
country the same successful selling patterns are being used. 

Two major television programs sponsored by The Frito Co. are 
Big Town and Frosty Frolics, the latter being an ice review which has 
won top ratings in California. Big Town is broadcast over WBAP- 
TV, Fort Worth; Frosty Frolics is seen over KTLA-TV, Los Angeles. 

Doolin, who is still president, doesn't wait for the business to ex- 
pand itself; be makes sure it continues to grow by dreaming up 
new promotions and getting bigger plants on the drawing boards. 
His hobby — not to let any hobby interfere with work, even photog- 
raphy which be enjoys. * * * 



10 



SPONSOR 



Corwpef/Uuj 1 erformGnce . . . 




in the BIGGER and BETTER memphis market 




In selling as in showmanship, it's the 
quality of the performance that deter- 
mines the interest of the audience. In the 
greater Memphis Market, comprising 76 
rich counties with a buying potential of 
over $2 Billion, you'll always find the 
greatest audience tuned to WREC. 
HERE'S WHY: High quality program- 
ming and engineering perfection insure 
good reception and a compelling per- 
formance of interest to your best custo- 
mers. WREC prestige adds believability 
to your message, too! The cost is another 
pleasant surprise . . . 10% LESS per 
thousand listeners than in 1946! 



MEMPHIS NO. 1 STATION 

REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 
AFFILIATED WITH CBS RADIO, 600 KC — 5000 WATTS 



12 JANUARY 1953 



11 



PURINA 



Sa/afes th 



e 



MNN1NG STATIONS 



WPLH 

Huntington, 
W.Vo. 



WKRT 

Cortland, "J 
N.Y. 



WRHI 



WVOP 

Vidalia, 

Georgia 



WLAC 

Nashville, 

Tenn. 



WFLO 

Farmville, 



WEKR 

Fayetteville, 
Tenn. 



KWRC 

Pendleton, 
Ore. 



Memphit, 
Tenn. 



San Francisco, 
Calif. 




CO! 

picl 



iD 

Th. 



rr 



RADIO PUT THESE 

LIVE DEMONSTRATIONS 

OYER WITH A BANG 




I I 



RADIO AGAIN PROVES TO BE POWER 
LOCAL PROMOTION FOR PURINA DEALERS 



The twenty-three radio stations whose pennants fly over 
the Purina Bowl Game stadium on the opposite page are 
the cream of the crop of America's farm radio merchan- 
disers. Because they know how to make farm radio really 
sell at the local level, two representatives of each station 
received all-expense trips to New Year's Bowl Games at 
Purina's expense. They were accompanied by the Purina 
Dealers they had helped during September, October and 
November with local store promotions. 

ENTRIES DOUBLED IN '52 

Competition was keen and the judges had a hard time 
picking the winners. There were twice as many entries as 
in 1951. And almost every one represented an outstand- 
ing local promotion job — a magnificent example of coop- 
eration between station and dealer at the local level. 

IDEAS UNLIMITED 

The job was to help Purina Dealers promote two live 
demonstrations in their stores . . . the "Mike & Ike" pig- 



growing demonstration and the "Lay & Pay" egg-laying 
demonstration. Radio made these demonstrations into 
community projects known to every man, woman and 
child. There were pig scrambles, parades, dances, enter- 
tainments, fund-raising devices, contests and many more 
promotion ideas. They built store traffic and increased 
sales and prestige for the Purina Dealers. They put the 
radio stations in the community spotlight, too. 

We thank every station, winner or loser, for the many 
jobs well done — for proving again that there's real power 
in radio. In the entries we have the proof. And as a result 
we say more enthusiastically than ever — "Purina believes 
in farm radio!" 

RALSTON PURINA COMPANY 



<f^-f>c^<^- y^ \W3u~_ 



G. M. Philpott, Vice-President 
and Advertising Director 




Maury Malin, Advertising Manager 
Purina Chow\ Division 



MIKE and IKE 

Two pigs grown in the store to dem- 
onstrate the value of proper feeding. 




LAY and PAY Five hens, each from a local poul- 
tryman's flock, compete for egg-production honors. 




I Within your grasp • . . with 

The Housewives of Baltimore . . . the little woman who picks the brands, 
who spends the money! She watches HOLLYWOOD PLAYHOUSE ... she 
wouldn't miss it! 

And here's what HOLLYWOOD PLAYHOUSE offers you . . . Five extra spots 
— in addition to your one minute commercial — and it costs nothing extra! 
More television advertising, for less money . . . selling your most impor- 
tant prospective customer ... is within your grasp when you choose 
HOLLYWOOD PLAYHOUSE. 



TELEVISION BALTIMORE 

WBAL-TV 



NBC IN MARYLAND 



Nationally Represented by Edward Petry & Co. 



14 



SPONSOR 



JVew and renew 




1 



2. 



3. 



\<'ir ott Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



Avco Corp, Crosley White 
Goods Div 

Avco Corp, Crosley Elec- 
tronics Div 

American Tobacco Co 

Anahist Company 



Ford Motor Co 
Ceneral Foods 
Miles Laboratories 

Union Pharmaceutical Co 



ill" '' t» AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Benton Bowles 


MBS 


500 


'Gator Bowl Game, Jacksonville, Fla; Th 1 Jan; 5 
min prev to game 


BBDO 


MBS 


500 


'Gator Bowl Game, Jacksonville, Fla; Th 1 Jan; 5 
min summary following game 


BBDO 


CBS 


195 


American Way; Th 10-10:30 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 


Ted Bates 


CBS 


200 


FBI in Peace and War; W 8-8:30 pm; 10, 17, 24, 
Dec; Meet Millie; Th 8-8:30 pm; 11, 18, 25 
Dec; Mr. Keen; F 8-8:30 pm; 12, 19, 26 Dec; 
(co-sponsor with American Chicle) 


J. Walter Thompson 


CBS 




Robert Trout; M-F 10:30-35 pm; 29 Dec; 52 wks 


Young & Rubicam 


NBC 


140 


Bob Hope; W 10-10:30 pm; 7 Jan; 52 wks 


Geoffrey Wade 


NBC 




New Year's Eve in New York, Chicago, San Fran- 
cisco; W 31 Dec; 11:45 pm-12:05 am; 1 Jan; 
12:45-1:05 am; and 2:35-3:05 am 


Crey 


MBS 


459 


Gabriel Heatter; F 7:30-45 pm; 16 Jan; 52 wks 



Renewed on Radio Networks 






SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Electric Companies Adver- 


N. W. Ayer 


ABC 257 


Meet Corliss Archer; F 9:30-10 pm; 2 Jan; 52 wks 


tising Program 








E. 1. DuPont 


BBDO 


NBC 140 


Cavalcade of America; T 8-8:30 pm; 6 Jan; 52 wks 


Mutual of Omaha 


Bozell & Jacobs 


NBC 191 


Bob Considine; Sun 3:30-45 pm; 8 Jan; 52 wks 


Procter & Gamble 


Compton 


CBS 157 


Road of Life; M-F 1-1:15 pm; 29 Dec; 52 wks 


Sun Oil Co 


Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & 


NBC 34 


Sunoco Three-Star Extra; M-F 6:45-7 pm; 12 Jan; 




Mather 




52 wks 



New National Spot Radio Rusiness 






SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET 


^CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


Block Drug Co, NY 


Amm-i-dent tooth- 
paste 


Cecil & Presbrey, NY 


Widely scattered 
mkts 


1-min anncts; also 5 & 15 min 
progs; st 16 Jan; 39 wks 


E. T. Browne Drug 
Co, NY 


Palmer Skin Success 
products 


Herschel Z. Deutsch, 
NY 


30 Negro mkts 


Partic, Negro progs; st Jan; to 
run thru Dec '53 


Hood Chemical Co, 
Phila 


Easy Starch 


Hilton & Riggio, NY 


35 mkts 


Annct campaign; st 2 Jan; 13 
wks 


Standard Brands, NY 


Chase & Sanborn 
coffee 


Compton, NY 


Scattered mkts 


Daytime-only campaign; st 1 
Jan; 52 wks 


Vick Chemical, NY 


Vicks Vaporub 


Morse Int'l ,NY 


Over 100 stns 


Annct campaign; 5 anncts wkly 
each stn; st 29 Dec; 2 wks 


Vitamin Corp of 
America, Newark 


Rybutol 


Kastor, Farrell, Ches- 
ley & Clifford, NY 


Selected mkts 


15-min progs; st 1 Jan; 6-8 
wks 


Whitehall Pharmacal 
Co, NY 


Anacin 


John F. Murray, NY 


Several hundred stns, 
coast to coast 


1-min anncts, early a.m. time; 
31 Dec; to run thru March 
or longer 


Whitehall Pharmacal 
Co, NY 


BiSoDol mints 


SSCB, NY 


Selected mkts, coast 
to coast 


Anncts, early a.m. time; to 
run thru March or longer 



National Rroadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Trevor Adams 


DuMont TV net, asst sis dir 


yWJZ-TV, NY, sis mgr 


John E. Arens 


WFAS, WFAS-FM, White Plains, NY, sis dir 


A Good Music Bdcstrs, NY, sis mgr 


Arthur W. Bagge 


Free & Peters, Chi, sis rep 


■ Same, radio sis mgr 


Ceorge Baron 


KOWL, Santa Monica, acct exec 


[.Same, sis mgr 


J. Henry Boren 


Food store owner, Cottonwood, Utah 


BkSL, KSL-TV, Salt Lake City, mdsg dir 


Keith S. Byerly 


WBT, WBTV, Charlotte, sis mgr 


1 Katz Agency, mgr Atlanta off 


Slocum Chapin 


ABC, vp chg owned TV stns 


^Same, also gen mgr WJZ-TV, NY 


Norman H. Chester 


WNBC, NY, acct exec 


IwjZ, NY, acct exec 


Kenneth Church 


WKRC, Cinci, sis mgr 


■ Radio Cincinnati, vp 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot); 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 




JK 






Numbers niter names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 



William H.Hylan 

Ted Oberielder 
Wally McGough 
Trevor Adams 
J. Henry Boren 



(4) 
(4) 
(4) 
(4) 
(4) 



12 JANUARY 1953 



15 



12 JANUARY 1953 



\eir find rvneir 



4. 





// 




National Broadcast Sales Executives (continued) 

NAME I FORMER AFFILIATION I 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Arthur ). Daly 
Thomas H. Dawson 
S. C. Digges 
A. C. Dowden 
Ceorge Fisher 
Clark Ceorge 
William H. Hylan 
Warren Jennings 
Cus Kruttschnitt 
Bill Lamar 
Milton L. Levy 
Joseph R. Matthews 
Quintin E. McCredie 
Wally McCough 
Paul Mowrey 
Cene Myers 
Robert E. Newsham 
Karl Nelson 
John E. North 
Ted Oberfelder 
Charles Phelps 
Mike Shapiro 
Arnold Starr 
Niles Trammell 



Ceyer Adv. NY, TV acct exec 

CBS TV Spot Sales, NY, gen sis mgr 

CBS TV Spot Sales, NY, eastern sis mgr 

KARK, Little Rock, Ark, city sis mgr 

United TV Progs, sis exec 

CBS TV Spot Sales, NY, acct exec 

CBS TV Sales, NY, eastern sis mgr 

WjZ, NY, comml mgr 

WMMW, Meriden, Conn, sis mgr 

KTSA, San Antonio, sis prom mgr 

KLX, Oakland, adv, sis mgr 

Weed & Co, mgr SF office 

KMMJ, Grand Island, Neb, sis prom mgr 

WTVN, Columbus, sis mgr 

WJZ-TV, NY, prog dir 

WTAM, Cleve, sis mgr 

L. E. Phillips, Phila, partner 

WTOL, Toledo, mgr 

Radio Reps, Chi, vp 

ABC, NY, dir owned radio stns 

NBC Radio, NY, acct exec 

WFAA-TV, Dallas, exec 

WMCA, NY, sis rep 

NBC, NY, chmn of bd 



DuMont TV Net, NY, acct exec 

CBS TV Net, NY, sis mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, comml mgr 

Guild Films, district sis mgr 

Same, eastern sis mgr 

CBS TV Net, NY, vp chg sis 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, NY, acct exec 

Same, gen mgr 

KCOR, San Antonio, sis prom, mdsg mgr 

Same, mgr 

A. C. Nielsen, SF, western sis mgr, Nielsen Cov 

KOA, Denver, sis prom mgr 

Same, gen mgr 

Same, stn mgr 

Edward Lamb radio-TV properties, mdsg mgr 

WFIL, Phila, radio sis rep 

Edward Lamb radio-TV properties, reg'l sis mgr 

WOR-TV, KHJ-TV, Chi sis stf 

Same, vp chg owned radio stns 

NBC, NY, asst night exec officer 

KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Tex, comml mgr 

WPAT, Paterson, NJ, sis stf 

Biscayne TV Corp, Miami, pres 






Serv 






5. 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Joseph M. Allen 
William P. Black 
Luther Conant Jr. 
Berned Creswell 
Stuart K. Hensley 
Erik Isgrig 
William S. Richardson 



Bristol-Myers Co, NY, vp chg pub rel 

Lever Brothers, NY, sis exec 

Edward L. Bernays, NY, sr acct exec 

P. Ballantine & Sons, Newark, NJ, exec 

Toni Co, Chi, gen sis mgr 

Earle Ludgin & Co. Chi, acct exec 

B. F. Goodrich Co, Akron, vp 



NEW AFFLIATION 



ANA, NY, media & res exec 

Same, ind'l detergent sis mgr 

Lever Bros, NY, product publicity mgr 

Same, sis superv 

Same, vp chg sis 

Zenith Radio Corp, Chi, dir adv 

Same, dir & exec vp 



!%ew Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR 



Andiee's Food Prods. LA 
Bol Mfg Co, Chi 

Conmar Products Corp, Newark, NJ 

Cott Quality Beverages, New Haven, Conn 

C. A. Durr Packing Co, Utica, NY 

Fairmont Foods Co, Omaha, Neb 

Jackson & Perkins, Newark, N| 

The Lander Co, NY 

Joseph Martinson & Co, NY 

Melville Shoe Corp, NY 

Minneapolis Brewing Co. Mnpls 

Pal Blade Co, NY 

Stauffer Svstem (nationwide chain of health 

& reducing salons) 
Toni Co, Chi 

Toni Co, Chi 
Toni Co, Chi 
Toni Co, Chi 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Salad dressings, barbecue sauce 
Hopalong Cassidy Aid 'gelatin powder 

for soft drinks* 
Conmar zippers 
Soft drinks 
Meat packer 

Food processors & marketers 
Flower growers 
Dixie Peach, other cosmetics 
Jomar instant coffee and tea 
Thorn McAn shoes 
Grain Belt Beer 

Pal, Personna blades (foreign advtgl 
Posture-Rest home plan 

Toni Home Permanent, Tonette Chil- 
dren's Home Permanent 
Prom Home Permanent 
Toni Creme Shampoo 
Bobbi Home Permanent 



AGENCY 



Philip J. Meany Co, LA 
Schwimmer & Scott, Chi 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY 

Dowd, Redfield & Johnstone, NY 

Barlow Advertising, Syracuse 

Allen & Reynolds, Omaha 

Maxwell Sackheim & Co, NY 

Herschel Z. Deutsch, NY 

Anderson & Cairns, NY 

Anderson & Cairns, NY 

Bruce B. Brewer & Co, Mnpls 

Int'l Div of Grant Adv, NY 

Walter McCreery, Beverly Hills 

Weiss & Geller, Chi (eff 1 Marl 

Leo Burnett, Chi left 1 Mar) 

Price, Robinson & Frank, Chi (eff I Mar) 

Tatham-Laird, Chi (eff 1 Mar) 



A 




Numbers after names 

refer tn New and Re- 
new category 

Kenneth Church (4) 

... C. Dowden (4) 

Milton Levy ' I > 

\ iles Trammell (4) 

Keith S. By erly 14) 

Joseph 1/. Allen (5) 

Sinari K. Hensley (5) 

/.. I <man I, Jr. < ."> ) 

Itemed Creswell (5) 

William I'. Muck (5) 



16 




WKRC 

DOMINATES 





BASED ON A 10 YEAR PERIOD 

Comparison Cincinnati Hooper Share of Audience — Mar. Apr. 1942 to Apr. 1952 



MORNING 



AFTERNOON 



EVENING 




David G. Taft, Vice President 
Radio Cincinnati, Inc. 
Kenneth W. Church, National Sales Mgr. 
Radio Cincinnati, Inc. 



And according to the 1952 September-October Local 
Pulse, WKRC dominates morning, afternoon and evening. 
No wonder advertisers choose WKRC. 
National and local sales up 21% over WKRC's former 
six months PEAK period (BEFORE TELEVISION). 
National sales up 25%; Local sales up 17%. 



^riiyiiiuiimiuiuufiiiimimiuiumuiuuiutiimiitiiuiiiiffliiiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiifiiiifiiiiiiHiiijiiiJii^ 

I BASEBALL IN '53 ( 

Baseball in California 

1 for '53 Means 

The Pacific Coast Champions 
| of 1952- | 

The Hollywood Stars 

and again 

Exclusive Radio 
Broadcast 



on 



KFWB 



Available for whole or part 
sponsorship 



contact today 



THE 

BRANHAM 

COMPANY 



NCW YORK 

CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 

IOS ANCflfS 

CHAR LC HI 

OIIROIT 

ATLANTA 

MEMPH'S 

ST. lOiMt 

DALLAS 



27mm 

of service in 

America's 

THIRD LARGEST 

MARKET 




LOS ANGELES 

HARRY MAIZLISH 

I'rruJrml ■ Gtmtrml Ma-jfrr 



Netv developments on SPONSOR stories 





Caroling puppets helped investment house sell mutual funds as Christmas gifts 

See: "Stocks on the air" 

Issue: 28 July 1952. p. 22 

SllbjCCt: Puppets provide Yuletide setting for 
Kidder. Peabody gift offer 

Around Christmas time, a wide variety of sponsors plug their 
products as gifts — and this season, investment house Kidder, Peabody 
& Co., New York, was no exception. 

Kidder, Peabody felt that its Mutual Fund gift certificates would 
make nice Christmas presents. To tell people about them, agency 
Doremus & Co., decided to make the pitch via TV. 

They bought two 15-minute segments on WNBT, New York, 12:15 
to 12:30 p.m., on Sundays, 7 and 14 December. The program con- 
sisted of a film of Sue Hastings' marionettes singing Christmas carols 
(see cut). Announcer Bob Denton talked (live) about Kidder, Pea- 
body and its Christmas special (in commercials prepared by Doremus 
Radio-TV Director Ed Rooney). The first commercial was an institu- 
tional pitch, the second pointed out the advantages of mutual funds 
and how to get the gift certificate, the final tag solicited inquiries. 

A satisfied user of broadcast advertising, Kidder, Peabody is cut- 
ting newspaper appropriations in order to enlarge its air budget. 

See: "The merchandising problem" 

Issue: 1 December 1952, p. 53 

Subject* Each station offers sponsors its 
own brand of promotional support 

WHLI, Hempstead. Long Island. N. Y.. capitalized on the holiday 
season with a special promotion that brought the station closer in 
body — and spirit — to both advertisers and listeners. 

"Operation Noel" was a joint effort of the station's Sales, Pro- 
gram and Public Affairs Departments. Special holiday programs 
originated from WHLI advertisers' places of business. For example, 
a two-hour musical program emanated from the Meadowbrook Na- 
tional Bank, where more than 600 people gathered for the broadcast. 
The station also tape-recorded and aired personal holiday greetings 
from more than 40 advertisers. 

Via other programs, "Operation Noel'' brought WHLI in direct 
contact with 14 community organizations. The station estimates that 
well over 115,000 persons witnessed its special "Noel" programs. *** 




18 



SPONSOR 



at home 



in new haven 




New Haven is proud 

of its industries and the happy 
associations maintained between 

employees and management. Peo- 
ple like working and living in New 
Haven. Its healthy economic life 
means more business for you! 



You can reach the busy people 

of New Haven at home through 
WNHC. Radio dials stay set at 

WNHC — almost as though they 
were locked by the H. B. Ives Com- 
pany! Best of all, the people in the 
rich New Haven area respond to 

sales messages over WNHC — 
like a lock to its right-fitting key. 



"Don't forget to lock the windows!" is a familiar admonition to most of us. The 
locks referred to were probably manufactured by the H. B. Ives Company of New 
Haven. 

Hobart B. Ives started the business in 1876 by making mortise door bolts. The 
company constantly expanded and by the turn of the century was equipping famous 
buildings with Ives hardware. Among them are the Flat Iron Building, the Wool- 
worth. Chrysler and Empire State Buildings, Rockefeller Center and the Pentagon. 




- J I g ff s ilk 






lit ' ■■■ 



y=5*j 






n h c 




fl6W haVen New England's first 
complete broadcasting service 

Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 



12 JANUARY 1953 



19 



. 



"Imitation is 
the sincerest form 
of flattery" 



SPONSOR is the 
most imitated trade magazine 
covering the advertising 
field today! 



SPONSOR 



The magazine radio and TV advertisers use 



Make 

Friends 

With 

Gil 




COLOSSUS OF THE CAROLINAS 



Newscaster, philosopher, friendly voice of a famous 
station, WBT's Gil Stamper makes friends of folks 
and friends for sponsors. Sincere, affable, convincing 
Gil has the native know-how which distinguishes 
WBT as a powerful local voice for national 
advertisers. Let Gil and WBT make 3,000,000 
Carolina friends for you. 




CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



Represented Nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



12 JANUARY 1953 




IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll Illlllll I I!llllllllllll!lll!lll!l!!l I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUI 



WrC « mi •Erich son forecasts slum- details of TV growth 

hi ttvo years, McCann-Erickson feels, the 125 largest TV markets will contain 
78% of the population of the U.S., and will account for some HI)' < of retail 
sales. Some 250 additional markets, however, may add only 9% in audience size 




TV status 


Markets 


Commercial 
stations 


% of U.S. 
population 


% of U.S. 
retail sales 


63 CURRENT 
MARKETS 

(June 1952) 

62 NEXT URGEST 

MARKETS 
125 TOTAL 

MARKETS 

(Dec 1954) 

250 NEXT URGEST 
MARKETS 


63 

62 
125 


171 

175 
346 


63% 

15% 
78% 

9% 


68% 

12% 
80% 


250 


9% 



"Television has already strengthened the applications of mass advertising and 
promotion at all marketing levels. By 1954. television will have rounded out 
its dimensions for mass selling in all major U.S. markets, in all distribution 
channels, and at all distribution levels in planned coordination with all other 
selling forces, and be thus capable of earning a $750,000,000 outlay." 



Sidney W. Dean Jr.. V.P.. Director Marketing 
McCann-Erickson. Inc. (Seen at left) 



McCann-Erickson's Sid Dean 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllM 

.11111 TV stations: how major 
agencies see the picture 

Some 80% of U. S. families inay be within reach of video by 1955 



WW ith TV launched on its second 
postwar boom, the era of 500 TV sta- 
tions in the U.S., and 125-station video 
networks is no longer an adman's pipe 
dream; soon it will be a reality. The 
map on the following pages shows that 
nearly a dozen important "new" video 
markets, from Denver and Portland to 
Roanoke and Austin, have gone on the 
active list since mid-1952. Nearly, two 
dozen more TV markets will be operat- 
ing by 1 February 1953. 

Time costs of large-scale TV are 
again rising. An executive of SSCB 
told sponser unofficially that "by 1955 

12 JANUARY 1953 



a weekly half-hour dramatic TV show, 
televised on a 'full network' of 125-150 
stations on a 39-week contract, may- 
cost the average sponsor anywhere 
from $2,500,000 to $3,000,000 for 
time and talent.*' In 1947, many a 
national advertiser spent that much as 
his total, all-media ad budget. 

Television is also headed swiftly for 
near-national coverage, in terms of 



trend 



U.S. homes within range of video out- 
lets. NBC researchers, for instance, 
now feel that 80 % of the total number 
of U.S. families may be living under 
the TV umbrella sometime in early 
1955. This percentage figure will con- 
tinue to rise as families in the latest 
round of TV markets buy more video 
sets, and as the final group of TV sta- 
tions go on the air. Ultimately, per- 
haps by 1960, 90' < or more of the 
homes in the U.S. will be TV's poten- 
tial audience. 

Agencies are under terrific pressure 
from leading clients as the planning 



23 



for the 1953-54 advertising season gets 
underway. The pressure is understand- 
able. Clients in the multi-million 
brackets need the latest TV predictions 
in order to plan their long-range ad- 
vertising and marketing strategy. Ques- 
tions such as these are uppermost in 
the minds of top management : How 
big is TV likely to grow? How much 
advertising money must be set aside as 
a "reserve" to keep pace with TV's 
growth? What will "national" TV 
campaigns cost? Will they be worth 
it? 

Five years ago, such questions could 
be parried gracefully, and nobody was 
the worse for it. Today, the answers 
to these questions play a large role in 
shaping everything from over-all bud- 
get formulas to marketing policies. 
Recognizing the high interest in this 
subject, SPONSOR explored the TV 
thinking of several major ad agencies 
— notably McCann-Erickson, Young & 
Rubicam. BBDO. and SSCB. Research 
and sales executives of the two largest 
TV networks were also interviewed. 
Today, the problems of TV's future 
growth weigh as heavily on air media 
as they do on media planners. 

What these agencymen and network 
officials stated must be considered as a 
series of "educated guesses." However, 
the following forecasts are important 
signposts in mapping out the future 
route of air advertising dollars. 

Here, in a topic-by-topic round-up. 
is how the best-informed agency and 
network executives view the near- 
future of TV: 

TV audiences may double by 
J 955: Back in the early part of 1947, 
there were just 16,467 TV sets in the 
U.S., according to NBC. As new sta- 
tions came on the air, and set prices 
dropped, this figure jumped skyward. 
Last month, NBC calculated that there 
were 19,517,000 TV sets in the U.S.— 
more than 1,000 times the 1947 figure. 

This huge figure, which represented 
nearly 45% of the nation's total homes 
in mid-December 1952, is only the 
jump-off for TV's present growth 
pattern. 

McCann-Erickson — which has made 
a series of TV projections on three 
levels, "low." "intermediate," and 
"upper" — calculates on its "intermedi- 
ate" scales that there will be 26,800,- 
000 TV homes in the 125 leading U.S. 
markets by the end of 1954. This is 
about a 47' r increase over the level of 
T\ in the U.S. in September 1952. 



24 



Other projections take these figures 
even higher. According to an unofficial 
estimate of an NBC executive, TV 
"may be reaching 40,000,000 homes 
in the then-active TV markets through- 
out the U.S. at the end of 1955." 

The most eye-opening figure of all 
is one contained in an elaborate Young 
& Rubicam TV presentation. This 
pitch has been made to such leading 
agency clients as Borden Co., General 
Foods, General Electric, Gulf Oil 
Corp.. Procter & Gamble, and Singer 
Sewing Machine Co. In its well-charted 
predictions for TV's future growth, 
Y&R forecasts that TV will be active 
(one or more stations. VHF and UHF) 
commercially in 1.241 cities and towns 
by 1963. TV will then cover some- 
thing like 95 r r of total U.S. homes. 
The actual number of TV homes, at 
that time will be about 70-75% of that 
figure, Y&R feels. 

Key points for admen: The follotv- 
ing "intermediate projections" of Mc- 
Cann-Erickson are likely to be a re- 
liable, year-by-year guide for the next 
few seasons: 19,600.000 TV homes in 
some 79 markets, by the start of Janu- 
ary 1953; 23.500,000 TV homes in the 
164 largest U.S. markets by December 
1953; 26,900.000 TV homes in the 
164 largest markets by December 1955. 

Networks will be 100-plus TV 
stations: Executives of the four ma- 
jor TV webs feel that TV network line- 
ups of the future will soon resemble 
the kind of station lists possible in 
radio in the past decade or longer ago. 

Both NBC TV and CBS TV, for 
example, have been telling ad agencies 
in recent weeks that they will offer a 
"basic" network (no split-affiliations, 
or single-station markets, a la Pitts- 
burgh or New Orleans) in the 75 top 
U.S. markets by the end of 1956. In 
addition they will be able to offer 
groups of supplementary stations, total- 
ing perhaps another 75 markets. The 
total number of TV stations in the 
U.S., at that point, may easily be 
around 600. 

Networks of this size are very likely 
to represent the outer limits of basic 
network growth. Certainly, there will 
be more than 600 TV stations in the 
U.S. in another decade. But. many of 
them will be serving small areas, or 
will be so new that set penetration will 
be very low. 

BBDO's Fred B. Manchec. executive 
v. p. in charge of research, told SPON- 



Young & Rubicam estimati 
TV network time may cost 
gross of ST. 1.000 ctti hour 



NETWORKS 


1-HR. 


i/ 2 -HR. 


i/4-hI 


64-station 
basis (1952) 


$51,325 


$30,795 


$20,531 


125 -station 

basis (1954) 


$69,050 


$41,430 


$27,62 


150-station 
basis (1955) 


$75,275 


$45,165 


H 








1 



What gross time costs may look like on TV netwi 
oj next jew years is shown in Y&R chart abo 
Program could cost additional 50 to 100% 



llllllll!lllllll!ll[|||||lllllll!llllllll!llllll!lll!ll!lll!llll!lll!llllllll!l!llllllll!lim 

Ictttctl number of U. S. ritlt>< 
homes may hit 26,900,000 it 
164 largest markets by '55 I 




1953 /9SV 

W,600,000 Z3fSOqoOO 



/9SS 

26,900,001 



McCann-Erickson projections on "intermediate 1 ' b 
in chart above show future TV audience in 164 
markets may be 54% oj U. S. homes 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIII!I!IIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!I!III!M . 



SOR that the big Madison Avenue agen- 
cy is urging video clients to proceed 
"cautiously" in the matter of increas- 
ing the size of their individual TV net- 
works. "Certainly, the growth of TV 
networks will ease many of the present 
problems of clearing network time." he 
added, "but in new markets it may be 
wise for advertisers to wait until the 
degree of set penetration has been 
clearly determined before trying to es- 
tablish time franchises." 






SPONSOR 







450-500 TV outlets may serve 54% of all U.S. homes in 164 markets by 1955 



Mc-Cann-Erickson map of U.S. video (above) is conservative 
projection of future TV markets, updated by sponsor. The 164 



markets shown may eventually absorb from 450 to 500 TV 
stations by 1955. New, near-future markets appear below 



\vu-l>i €idded TV markets 

► DENVER, COLO. 

► COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

► YORK, PA. 

► ROANOKE, VA. 

► AUSTIN, TEX. 

► EL PASO, TEX. 

► LUBBOCK, TEX. 

► SPOKANE, WASH. 

► PORTLAND, ORE. 



TV markets to 

MOBILE, ALA. 
TUCSON, ARIZ. 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. 
PEORIA, ILL. 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 
HOLYOKE, MASS. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



be added early in l".tr,:t 

JACKSON, MISS. 
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 
MASSILON, OHIO 
YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
READING, PA. 
SCRAMTON, PA. 
WILKES-BARRE, PA. 
YAKIMA, WASH. 



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Both the agencies and the networks 
interviewed by sponsor agreed that 
TV networks would play a large role 
in the future of TV programing. "TV 
will be so large and so costly that 
agencies won't be able to take the 
chance on producing an agency-built 
show which may, or may not, be a 
dud," Y&R's Jim Schulke, manager of 
account presentations, stated. "Pro- 
grams will be built largely by net- 
works, who will sell them on a partici- 



pation or 'insertion' basis, and by the 
independent package producers." 

Key points for admen: The present 
time buying hassles involving single- 
station markets in major population 
centers will disappear as networks 
round out their lists, the experts feel. 
Networks will probably level off some- 
where around the 125-150 station-mark 
in three or four years. And, the net- 
works will assume a great deal of the 
building of big TV shows. 



Costs of big-time TV are going 

up: With networks due to expand in 
size, advertisers will face substantial 
increases in the costs of network TV 
time, agencies feel. Some idea of the 
ultimate level of these TV network 
costs can be found in the Y&R chart 
on page 24. 

Meanwhile, SPONSOR learned that the 
major TV networks are offering the 
following yardstick to agencies to aid 
(Please turn to page 72) 



12 JANUARY 1953 



25 



Sundial saturation bowls 'em over 

New England shoo manufacturer switched from costly TV effort to satura- 
tion spot radio campaign, persuaded local dealers to tie in and split cost 



M. lie Sundial division of the Inter- 
national Shoe Co. put reverse English 
on the current trend among air adver- 
tisers: Sundial switched from TV to 
radio. 

\fter 18 months of a TV kid show, 
Sundial found that its sales results 
were not keeping pace with zooming 
TV costs. What's more, network video 
did not offer the flexibility which the 
Manchester. N. H., shoe company de- 
nied in order to make its advertising 
program coincide with its seasonal sell- 
ing pattern. 

The shoe firm and its advertising 
agency, Hoag & Provandie of Boston, 
are now convinced that they have 
found the solution to the problem: a 
saturation radio spot announcement 
campaign used during the two five- 
week periods I pre-Easter and pre-back- 
to-school) in which the sale of young- 
sters" shoes tend to bunch up. Inas- 
much as Sundial derives a large per- 




Jim Edwards, Sundial's ad 
manager, on spot radio: 

HI am convinced that spot radio 
advertising is doing a really effective 
job for Sundial shoes on several im- 
portant counts, lis flexibility per- 
mits us to peal.' spot saturations to 
the important buying seasons. By 
open-ending transcribed spots, we 
are able to offer our dealers an op- 
portunity foi local lie-ins. This 
makes Sundial's over-all advertising 
program more merchandisalde to the 
dealer. And finally, the economy of 
spot radio permits saturations of 
both large and small markets with 
a reasonable advertising budget.99 



i:!iii:iiii!iiii!iiiiiiiiiiiii!!iiii!ii>iii:i!!iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiii!iii:iiii;iiiiiiiiiliiiiii; 



centage of its revenue from kids' shoes, 
the solution reached seems to make 
sense. 

After a test campaign in spring 
1952. the agency placed a fall cam- 
paign of 8,500 announcements on 79 
radio stations during the back-to- 
school period. Sundial dealers, who 
paid a share of the costs, were enthusi- 
astic about the results and over 90 f /i 
of them have already signed up for the 
upcoming Easter promotion. 

And Sundial, whose sales for fiscal 
year 1952 topped the $11 million 
mark, is sufficiently impressed with the 
million-dollar gain over 1951 to give 
radio about .$200,000 of this year's 
$264,000 ad budget. (Source of fig- 
ures: sponsor estimate.) 

But air media were not always Sun- 
dial favorites. Newspapers got the 
lion's share of the ad budget during 
the first six years. Then Paul Hoag. 
account supervisor, and Myron East- 
wood, account executive, presented a 
plan for a TV campaign to Sundial. 

This major switch was approved by 
Sundial's top policymakers: E. J. 
Gormley. general manager; James U. 
Edwards, ad manager; Sales Managers 
Hugh Warren (Men & Boys) and Jo- 
seph McCarthy (Women & Childrens I . 

The TV program selected was Lucky 
Pup which CBS TV was airing across- 
the-board. 15 minutes daily. Sundial 
bought one segment I Friday I a week 
in 14 cities and devised a giveaway to 
lest its power. 

Traffic builder: \ cardboard cut- 
out model of a TV station, jig-saw 
puzzle, and Foodini masks were of- 
fered at various times to every young- 
ster who enticed an adult into a Sun- 
dial shoe outlet. Dealers, who paid 
about a dime apiece for the giveaways, 
were quickly swamped b\ eagci kid- 
and their somewhat reluctant parents. 
During the 18 months that Sundial 



used TV, over 825,000 items were 
given away to children. 

Conversion of this increased store 
traffic into sales varied widely, depend- 
ing upon the dealers' sales ability. 
Many stores with aggressive sales staffs 
came through with near-perfect scores. 
Dealers were happy to discover that 
many parents were presold on Sundial 
as a result of having been exposed to 
the TV commercials. As it turned out. 
almost 35-40' { of the audience of the 
"kid show" was adult. 

Video shows Lucky Pup ran from 

20 January 1950 to 11 May 1951 
(with a hiatus from 14 July 1950 to 
18 August ) on 14 CBS TV outlets. On 

21 August 1951 the program was over- 
hauled, converted into a weekly half- 
hour film package, re-named Foodini 



case history 



The Great, and aired on the ABC TV 
net Saturday mornings. Talent costs 
zoomed almost 400'/ (from $750 to 
$2,800) and Sundial, which was spon- 
soring 15 minutes of the show, soon 
found the program too rich for its 
blood. On 17 November 1951 the com- 
pany pulled out of TV and looked 
around for a suitable substitute. 

.Spol radio: Hoag and Eastwood 
came to the conclusion that radio was 
the medium which offered the most in 
flexibility, low cost-per- 1,000, and the 
adman's old standby — repetition. As 
Myron Eastwood puts it. "In radio you 
can bulk advertising to fit your sales 
pattern. And by spot buying, waste 
is virtually eliminated.' 

Sundial's ad manager. James U. 
Edwards, backs this up by saying, "I 
am convinced that spot radio adver- 
tising is doing a rcalK effective job 
for Sundial Shoes on several important 



26 



SPONSOR 



: ormer video show: Sundial used "Lucky Pup" show for 18 months and was 
appy with results. When show switched from live to film, costs zoomed and 
hoe company abandoned TV. Pert Doris Brown worked with puppets on show 



Su/udJafi BONNIE IAD0IE SJioeJ * Real Shoes for Real Boys and Girls B 



Traffic builder: Firm used giveaways such as jiqsaw puzzle above to get kids 
to entice parents into Sundial stores. Dealers were so pleased with demand 
(over 825.000) that the company will use the "magic" ring offer on radio 



counts. Its flexibility gives us peak 
spot saturations in the important buy- 
ing seasons. By open-ending tran- 
scribed spots, we are able to offer our 
dealers an opportunity for local tie-ins. 
This makes Sundial's over-all advertis- 
ing program more merchandisable to 
the dealer. And finally, the economy of 
spot radio permits saturations of both 
large and small markets while still 
staying within a reasonable advertis- 
ing budget." 

Backing up this reasoning, a spot 
radio saturation campaign was tested 
in New England and part of Pennsyl- 
vania in the spring of 1952. 

For the big fall campaign dealer 
participation was deemed necessary in 
order to get maximum saturation dur- 
ing the five-week campaign without up- 
setting Sundial's ad applecart. The 
70-man Sundial sales force was called 
in and briefed on the new plan. 

Sundial dealers I who are now 
spotted throughout the territory east 
of the Mississippi I were offered pack- 
ages of 10 or 20 announcements. These 
retailers were expected to pay their 
share of the time cost, but not more 
than $5.00 per announcement. A series 
of four jingles was transcribed and 
made a part of a recorded sales pitch. 
Sundial salesmen, armed with the disk 
and a portable phonograph, hit their 
territories to line up dealer coopera- 
tion. 

Here's a sample of what the dealers 
heard when the disk was played: 

"Ring! Another Sundial sales. And 
that's just what the following Sundial 

12 JANUARY 1953 



radio spots give you. New York-pro- 
duced by top-flight talent, tested in a 
limited sales area in a six-week spring 
promotion, these bouncy jingles did a 
real man's job in rounding up and 
ringing up Sundial sales. And notice 
that each commercial has an eight- 
second spot at the end for your tie-in." 
Then followed the four jingles, each 
one hitting heavily at a particular 
member of the family but followed b\ 
a broad appeal. The jingle slanted at 
\oung girls is typical: 



"Sundial shoes are the shoes that 

sisters wear, 
Shoes that brothers wear, fathers 

and mothers wear; 
Sundial shoes — Ih-\ ! 
Why not buy a pair: Sundial shoes. 
"Sister, Oh Sister, 
When you're in the store say. 

'Mister. 
I want good fit so 111 tr\ 
A Bonnie Laddie Sundial Shoe.' 
It's true, they'll look so nice on \ou. 
{Please turn to page 82) 



piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiyiii^ 

Why Sundial settled on spot radio 

1. The flexibility of spot radio permitted Sundial 

to pinpoint advertising, hit only those communities in which 
it had sales outlets. 

2. With the sale of children's shoes bulking heavily in 

two five-week periods, Sundial used saturation campaigns during 
these periods, considerably lighter the rest of the year. 

3. Using open-end transcriptions gave local dealers a chance 
to tie in and closely associate themselves with the product. 

4. Giveaways, which worked successfully in previous I I 
campaign, will be added to upcoming radio saturation 

to build store traffic. 

5. Dollar for dollar, spot radio gave Sundial more intensity, 
repetition, and sales punch than am other medium. 



21 



Will M be the big fact-findiii: 
year for radio? 



SPONSOR survey indicates 



near-record spending for multiple set, out-of-home, other research 



./In industrial analyst once wrote: 
"You can measure the vitality of an 
industry by the amount of research 
going on in it. Nothing replenishes the 
vigor of an industry as much as the 
fodder that comes from a persistent 
program of research, whether it be in 
the laboratory or in the pursuit of 
factual data." 

This observation has an especially 
apt significance for radio as the me- 
dium moves into 1953. A survey con- 
ducted by sponsor brought out plenty 
of evidence that a big job of fact re- 
plenishing will be done for radio dur- 
ing 1953. 

Intent on learning what the planning 
was for radio research, sponsor can- 



vassed research firms, the networks, 
station reps, and radio promotion or- 
ganizations. Key point emerging from 
this inquiry: The fact finders are not 
only geared to furnish radio with 
masses of material but they are seri- 
ously concentrating on doing some- 
thing to clear up many of the mistakes, 
inadequacies, and confusion that have 
accumulated in radio research over the 
years. 

The survey disclosed that the field 
of radio research had singled out these 
objectives for prime attention: 



research 



Six hiy faet-findiny projects slated for 1953 

1. Out-of-home listening: BAB and Pulse are putting lot 
of ivork into counting car radios, measuring their use 

2. Chechiny patry vs. radio use: ARB is adding to its 
techniques for matching purchases with family listening 

3. Multiple set listeniny: Most rating services agree it 
is imperative to measure all listening in the home; 

some are studying ways to implement the technique 

4. Listeniny at niyht in TV homes: NBC, BAB are chart- 
ing radio attention as compared to TV, newspapers, magazines 

5. Prohiny the ratiny services: ARF seeks to reduce the 
confusion from different rating techniques by "putting 
yardstick to reasons" and evaluating shortcomings 

6. Sales effe€'tivencss at store counter: BAB will add 
drug chains to ARIU studies on radio vs. newspapers 



Plllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 
28 



1' Implement the techniques for 
counting multiple-set and out-of-home 
listening so that the advertiser will be- 
come aware of the full dimensions of 
the radio audience. 

2. Reduce the complications created 
by the various rating systems to the 
point where the advertiser can better 
evaluate radio's true power of pene- 
tration and listening picture. 

3. Chart the listening pattern of ra- 
dio in TV homes at night in order that 
the buyer will have a keener concep- 
tion of how radio rates as an attention 
getter in comparison with TV, news- 
papers, and magazines. 

4. Expand to a major degree the use 
of the Advertising Research Bureau 
Inc. (ARBIl method of measuring 
sales effectiveness as between radio 
and newspapers at the point-of-sale. 

5« Document, on the basis of the 
latest circulation coverage figures, the 
concept that a radio network can over 
a period of weeks deliver enough un- 
duplicated homes to make it virtually 
a "must" for an advertiser to supplant 
his TV network operations with a ra- 
dio buy. 

6. Make a qualitative study into the 
influence dimensions of radio, deter- 
mining how deeply the medium influ- 
ences how many people in their buying 
and other habits. 

Judging from the scope and the mul- 
tiplicity of the projects reported either 
approved or on the drawing boards, it 
could be one of the top money years 
for radio research. Quite obvious is 
the fact that the two points which 
independent research organizations are 
focusing their developing efforts in- 
volve research gaps that have incurred 
great resentment from the radio indus- 
try: (1) failure to measure listening 
outside the living room; (2) treating 

(Please turn to page 79) 

SPONSOR 



A.RF sin dy maag hrinfjj vntl 1<p raiiitij muddle* in I OX 3 



Regarded as one of the most ambitious attempts by an inde- 
pendent media group to find out what ma'tes a specific 
facet of research tick is the present undertaking of the 
American Research Foundation to probe rating services. 
Supporters of this pilot study feel that it can go a long way 
toward minimizing the confusion among advertisers over 



the differences in ratings and toward reducing all basic 
rating methods to some common denominator. The four 
committees' chores are split up along the lines of observing 
how the services operate in the field, analyzing rating data, 
and projecting the "ideal" system. They are hopeful of ob- 
taining close cooperation of rating services in this project. 




Foundation's "seal of approval 



v 

•i standards and meth- 
ods of rating services 



G. Maxwell Vie (Chm.) 
K&E 

E. L. Deckinger, Biow 

Gordon A. Hughes, Gen- 
eral Mills 

Oliver E. Treyz, ABC 



G. Maxwell Ule 



"*# 



COMMITTEE ON RADIO AND TV 
RATING METHODS PROJECT 

E. L. Deehinyer (Chairmun) Diow 

Teddy Anderson DBDO 

Hutjh M. Seville NBC 

Harper Carmine CBS Radio 

Wallace T. Drew . . . Bristol-Myers 
Gordon A. Duyhes . . . General Mills 

J. James iVeale D-F-S 

Diehard J. Puff MBS 

Oliver E. Treyz ABC 

G. Maxwell Ule K&E 




Edgar Kobak, who sparked study 



FOUR WORKING COMMITTEES 



To inspect research prac- 
tices of rating services 



To analgze data issued by 
various rating services 



On specific rating prob- 
lems and rating methods 



G. Scotvcroft (Chm.) 
Campbell Soup 

Teddy Anderson, BBDO 

Harper Carraine, CBS 
Radio 

E, L. Deckinger, Biotv 

Norman Glenn, 
DCSS 

Hal Miller, Biotv 

Samuel Thurn, Y&R 

Gordon Scowcroft 



E. L. Deckinger (Chm.) 

Biotv 
Wallace T. Drew, 

Bristol-Meyers 
Howard Kuhn, Compton 
Richard J. Puff, MBS 
Bernard Sherak, K&E 



E. Lawrence Deckinger 







K_ 



^K«K 7 



H 


wry Wolfe (Chm.) 




Colgate 


H 


ugh M. Seville, NBC 


E. 


L. Deckinger, Biow 


J. 


James ISeale, D-F-S 




Harry Wolfe 




-~ ■•"*" m 






i 









How to demonstrate a girdle on II 



Sarong' firm used trick photography lo show girdle being worn by 

live model without indecorous exposure. Moral: There's a technique for 

making almost any product inoffensive if you find the right approach 



M. lie girdle that walks and wont 
ride up/" is the I. Newman & Sons. Inc. 
slogan for their Sarong garments, but 
the company was having a hard time 
figuring out a way of demonstrating 
this feature on TV screens when they 
first decided to enter the medium. Ar- 
thur Daly, free-lance TV council for 
the company, and Harold M. Mitchell, 
agency for Sarong girdles, checked the 
nets for acceptability of girdle copy 
and found themselves in a squeeze. 
The reaction from the four nets had 
one point in common : They were all 
unalterably opposed to showing such 
an intimate garment on a live model. 

Discouraged, but undefeated. Art 
Daly reported back to Harold Mitchell. 
who in turn called Paul Alley. TV film 
commercial producer, John Lewis and 
Irving Geiss, two of Paul Alley's staff- 
ers, into a huddle. Cameraman George 
Karger finally came up with an idea 
which solved the problem. "Dress the 
model up in jet black leotards and 
tights, 1 " he suggested. The girdle, 
which she was to wear over this outfit, 
was treated with phosphor, and the 
scene, showing the model walking, 
twirling, bending, was then photo- 
graphed under a black light process. 
Result: The commercial showed the 
girdle in action on a live model — but. 
without showing the model. 

The film, which is to be aired by 
department store outlets for Sarong 
girdles on a co-op basis, has three dif- 
ferent introductions: One shows a girl 
dancing in an evening dress: another 
shows her walking with a flog pulling 
at the leash; a third shows her swing- 
ing a golf club— all three unquestion- 
ably "action" introductions, proving 
that Sarong girdles do not hamper the 
wearer. The voice-over commentator 
then mentions the criss-cross feature of 
the garment that makes this ease of 
movement possible, and on the screen 
the audience sees the phosphorescenl 



girdle repeating the actions previously 
demonstrated by the clothed model. 

These films, which were scheduled 
for completion during the first week 
in January, are available to depart- 
ment stores on a co-op basis covering 
up to 4-'/{ of previous year's sales. 
That is. if a particular Sarong outlet 
decides to put up to 4' < of its last 
year's sales into a TV budget, the New- 
man Co. will then bear half the cost. 
Twenty seconds in length, the films 
conclude with a 10-second open end 
for the store's own identification copy. 

With distribution in about half the 
nation, the company plans to advertise 
in 76 markets this spring. Until their 
recent decision to plunge into spot TV. 
the firm and its agenc\ had concen- 
trated on newspaper advertising, with 
particular emphasis on Sunday supple- 



c o 



e r c i 



al 



ments. Their slogan — "The girdle that 
walks and wont rifle up" — introduced 
the new Sarong line via the black-and- 
white medium some two years ago. 
stressing the criss-cross manner in 
which the garment is cut. This feature 
suggested the name of the line. From 
a $3,000 advertising budget in 1950. 
Sarong has grown to a quarter-million 
dollar baby in advertising expenditure 
planned for l')o/>. This budget will be 
split between newspaper and television 
advertising in a proportion which de- 
pends to a large degree upon the re- 
sponse department stores throughout 
the country give to the co-op TV offer. 
Since girdles are neither truly sea- 
sonal nor fashion-bound, the commer- 
cials will be timeh and usable for 
seme three or lour \eais. it s exoecled. 
To merchandise them, the agenc\ or- 
dered offset storyboards which show 
six panels of the Sarong TV film. These 



were distributed to Newman Co. sales- 
men even before the film was complet- 
ed, and sent to stores that carry the 
Sarong account to encourage their par- 
ticipation in TV advertising. They have 
also been sent out to TV stations in 
Sarong markets, to encourage the sta- 
tions to approach department stores 
about the films. These folders show 
how the slogan and Sarong's criss-cross 
panel salespoint are brought out em- 
phatically in the TV commercials. Oth- 
er merchandising of the program in- 
cludes mentions of the films in an ad- 
vertising booklet that is sent to stores 
accompanied by a letter explaining the 
format of the commercial. 

The Newman Co.. incidentally, uses 
radio; mainly foreign-language radio 
and radio in Negro markets — for its 
heavy lace corsets, their standard line. 

Designed mainly for particularly fat 
women, these corsets can be sold effec- 
tively over programs keyed to special 
audiences. 

Network attitude towards gir- 
dles: Not the only girdle account ever 
to plan on TV. Sarong nevertheless 
stands out as the most original han- 
dling to date of the live-model prob- 
lem. Among other methods that have 
been suggested by the industry to net- 
work continuity-acceptance heads in 
the past are such devices as silhouette 
cut-aways, animation, demonstration of 
the article as it is taken out of the 
package without it ever being seen on 
;i model, or. finalb. a girdle shown on 
a dummy form. 

Stockton Hellfrick, NBC continuity 
acceptance director, recalls a proposed 
handling of girdle commercials thai 
was submitted by International Latex 
a year or so ago. They, loo. used a 
model clothed in black tights: over 
her form, an artist had drawn onto 
the film a white dotted line showing 
[Please turn to page 77) 



30 



SPONSOR 



Storybonrtl of Sarong's live-action film shows how "bicit-fc light" does the trick 




Film is done with live model; intro stresses action 2. Dancing above emphasizes Sarong slogan, ease of movement 




I. Close-up of girl in tight evening dress points up girdle line 4. Girl dissolves through black light leaving girdle disembodied 




i. Girdle freezes in ad position against dark backdrop G. Sarong logo appears with name of store sponsoring ad 



What political sponsorship il 

Convention and Election Night advertisers aided competitors' si 
reached tremendous radio-TV audiences, achieved strong br. 



jf-jdnien rank, as one of the greatest 
concentrated promotion campaigns in 
recent times the radio-TV sponsorship 
of the 1952 Presidential conventions 
and Election Night returns by three 
big appliance firms — Admiral, Philco, 
and Westinghouse. 

Great interest has been evinced in 
the advertising field as to what could 
have been the results from this cam- 
paign in terms of (1) sales and (2) 
audiences garnered by this incompara- 
bly expensive tieup with public interest 
programing (it cost the sponsors and 
networks involved about $12 million I . 
sponsor explored both these facets and 
here are the highlights of what has 
been discovered: 

I' Sales: The three-network sponsor- 
ship not only sparked sales in a big 
\\a\ for the three companies but it 



served to lift the entire appliance in- 
dustry out of its customary summer 
slump. 

'-• Promotion: The three firms agree 
that they got a brand identity impact 
which will endure for a long time. 
Also, never before have so many peo- 
ple been saturated with consciousness 



case history 



of what products the electric appliance 
manufacturer offers. 

3. Audience: Nine out of every 10 
radio and TV homes tuned in to the 
convention at one time or another. TV 
viewing was greater in terms of gross 
home-hours than radio listening. On 
the average. TV sets were tuned in to 



the conventions for three hours a day; 
radio-only homes were tuned in about 
half that time. No complete picture of 
Election Night audiences is yet avail- 
able, but the data at hand does show 
that nine out of 10 TV homes tuned in 
that night. 

J- Retrospection: The appliance trio 
think it was astute of them to pick up 
the full tab on their respective net- 
works for both convention and elec- 
tion returns coverage rather than to 
have let other advertisers join them in 
participation sponsorship. Nor do they 
think it was a mistake to have covered 
every minute of the convention, dull 
spots included. 

Report on soles: Probably the out- 
standing sales result of the conventions 
was the effect on the normal summer 



PERCENT OF TV HOMES REACHED BY ALL NETWORKS ON ELECTION NIGHT WAS NEARLY AS GREAT AS CONVENTION FIGURE 





MILLION J 9:30 IU 10:30 II 
TV HOMES 



11:30 M!cl 12:30 



52 



VBCs Kaltenborn, <// left in picture, gives election r 
Philco audience, reportedly the biggest of all TV networ 
above shows total homes reached on all TV networks by h 

SPONSOR 



ir appliances 



veil as own, 
ntificatton 



slump in appliance sales. There wasn't 
any. Westinghouse Account Executive 
Bill Ritenbaugh of Ketchum, MacLeod, 
and Grove told sponsor flatly that 
this "can be accredited to the tremen- 
dous political campaign package." 
I Westinghouse also sponsored 13 
weeks of Pick the Winner on CBS TV 
and DuMont. ) Admiral sold more re- 
frigerators during the Democratic 
Convention than any previous week 
during the year. (July 1951 was one 
of the worst months of the year for 
refrigerator sales so far as the industry 
as a whole was concerned.) 

Philco reported such success in sell- 
ing radios, TV sets, and air condition- 
ers that in the case of the first two, 
allocations were resumed, and, in the 
case of the latter, commercials were 
removed during the Democratic Con- 
vention. Summer months are, of 
course, good months for air condition- 
ers but Philco did not expect the huge 
demand that developed. 

John Gilligan, Philco vice president 
in charge of advertising, said: "Ordi- 
narily, the radio-television industry 
suffers from a slump in sales during 
the summer months. This year, be- 
cause of the political broadcasts, this 
slump did not occur. On the contrary, 
sales advanced sharply. From the first 
of July to the end of the year, Philco 
television receiver shipments to dis- 
tributors were on an allocation basis. 

"At the conventions, Philco intro- 
duced a new multi-wave radio. It had 
been expected that sales would increase 
gradually as the public became ac- 
quainted with these new sets. On the 
contrary, the sales response was in- 
stantaneous; existing stocks had to be 
put on allocation to Philco customers." 

Even competitors of the three ap- 
pliance sponsors agreed that the politi- 
cal sponsorship delivered a heavy sales 
wallop. Said a sales executive from 
one of the largest appliance firms: 
"The conventions did a terrific job for 
(Please turn to page 60) 

12 JANUARY 1953 



Listening-viewing totals of the political conventions 



1. 



Homes watched Ijj/ all radio. TV networks 




Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio 



Radio-only 
homes 
reached 



Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio & TV 



Figures 
extreme 



inside bars refer to percentage of homes reached within each homes category, liar on 
right shows that marc than nine out oi 10 radio and TV homes tuned to conventions 



Average tune-in hours per home reached 



SO 
25 
20 



10 




_iM_Bil — 

HfiUS m £ 9 I 



TV homes 
reached by 
TV &. radio 



TV homes 
reached 
by radio 



Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio 



Radio-only 
homes 
reached 



Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio & TV 



As in chart above, greater convention interest among TV homes is shown. To sponsor, these 
figures indicate higher relative exposure to commercials in TV homes than in radio-only homes 



Total tune-in hours for all homes 



837 t OOO t O0O 




MILLION 
HOME-HRS 



TV homes 
reached by 
TV & radio 



TV homes 
reached 
by radio 



Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio 



Radio-only 
homes 
reached 



Radio & 

radio-TV 

homes reached 

by radio & TV 



This chart is result of multiplying homes figure in Chart No. 1 by corresponding figures in 
Chart No. 2. Figures indicate greater gross tune-in time in TV homes than radio-only homes 

SOURCE: A C. Nielsen Co. 




Why radio is strong 



Leilehua (Wreath "I Lehua Blossoms) 
Beckei typifies Hawaii's polyglot /<"/'• 
Star radii). Tl . and Hawaiian Room 
{N.Y.) hula dancer, she's quarter Hawaiian 
rest French-English-German 



34 



in Hawaiian Islands 



Isolation, polyglot population make air tops 



MM avvaii is enjoying its greatest boom 
in history and only radio covers all 
the islands. Those are the two facts 
that cropped up repeatedly in SPON- 
SORS detailed survey of Hawaiian sta- 
tions, reps, sponsors, and agencies. 

All three of Hawaii's major indus- 
tries are enjoying record prosperity: 
( 1 I sugar, which means $136,000,000 
a year; (2 1 pineapples, which mean 
$100,000,000. and (3) tourists, who 
mean $40 million. 

And the only medium that covers 
all the 20 islands I nine inhabited I 
scattered over 400 miles of blue Pacific 
. . . the 465,325 inhabitants divided 
into six main linguistic groups and 
main lesser ones, is radio. 

For example, the biggest paper in 
the territory, the Honolulu Star-Bulle- 
tin, has a circulation of 76,715. But 
there are 122.370 homes, nearly half 
a million people. Magazine circulation 
i- low because of time, language, and 
distance barriers. Only radio gives 
blanket coverage — 119.000 of these 
122.000 homes, or all but 3,000. 

TV alreach has added a new element 
lo the picture. But at year-end only 
6,900 Honolulu homes had TV. The 
two stations there went on the air with- 
in two weeks of each other in Novem- 
ber and December. TV distributors say 
there will be 20.000 sets by 1 March 
and 40.000 by 1 June. In any case, 
broadcasting — both radio and TV- 
will remain the logical way to reach 
Hawaii's scattered population. 

Why should the market interest 
mainland advertisers? 

)t€irl<*'t small hut rich: Fin llol- 
lingcr. manager of the Inter-Island 

Network and v. p. of the Hawaiian As- 
sociation of Radio & TV Broadcasters, 
says: "Most people know so little 
about Hawaii that ad executives quite 
frankly label it America's 'mystery 



market.' " He points out these facts: 

'• Hawaii, fondly called "the 49th 
state" by its residents, is larger in area 
than several of the continental 48: 
Hawaii. 6.454 square miles; Connecti- 
cut. 5,009 square miles; Delaware, 
2.057 square miles: Rhode Island, 
1.214 square miles. 

'*• Hawaii's half-million population, 
spread over 400 miles in a string of 
four major islands, is greater than that 
of four other states: Nevada, 66% 
smaller; Wyoming, 38 r '< smaller; 
Delaware. 32' v smaller: Vermont, 
20'v smaller. 



status report 



•*• Hawaii's gross business in 1951 
was $1,367,000,000. Retail sales were 
$522,000,000. Total payroll was $476,- 
000.000. Hawaii's citizens paid more 
federal taxes than those of 12 other 
states. They imported $400,831,000 
worth of commodities, 95' /< of it from 
the U.S. mainland. Family income 
territorially is a high $5,086 while for 
Honolulu families. $6,706. Islanders are 
America's eatingest people, spending 
more food dollars per family than any 
of the 48 states, and they buy more 
general merchandise per family than 
any of the states except Illinois. 

4. The City of Honolulu, one of the 
world's most isolated metropolises, is 
comparable in market size with Ro- 
chester, N. Y., San Diego. Toledo, Fort 
Worth, or St. Paul. Its effective in- 
come per family is ninth highest of 
200 leading cities, and it is America's 
20th city in famib income. 

Half of Hawaii's population lives in 
Honolulu, and almost 70' < of it on the 
Island of Oahu. in Honolulu County. 
A smaller similar concentration of 

SPONSOR 



■rtffBwE 




Hawaiian stations merchandise heavily as shot of KVLA exhibit 
shows. Most stations program in several languages besides English 



Mil) 




STARTING TOMORROW MORNING Lis,en for Smi,in ' Ed ' 5 friends: 

hear the new FROGGY, the gren 

BUSTER BROWN oHOW grandy, »a« j*mo 

».nd., (u i ..„„, ...*.. .*<. ,.k... ...k „., ...„. midgut, tht I'll 

Smilin' Ed. ortd th* Bviitcr liown Gong 



Presented by The Smart Shoe Shop 



EVERY SATURDAY MORNING 

O O'clock (760 on your dial) iVVFw 



K(,( . mined by Honolulu Advertiser, advertises own programs. 
Hawaiian radio offers sponsors unique opportunity foi big (overage 



population is in the Territory's second 
city, Hilo, on the "Big Island" of Ha- 
waii. Here are how the four main 
islands and their principal cities rank: 



I •■la >ul 


Pop. 


City 


Pop. 


Oahu 


325,797 


Honolulu 


232,553 


Hawaii 


64,004 


Kilo 


25,545 


Maui (county) 


45,937 


Wailuku 


7,319 


Kauai (county) 


29,288 


I.ihue 


4,254 



There are 155,000 automobile regis- 
trations in Hawaii, as well as 120,000 
phones. 

•>. Hawaii's economy is strengthened 
greatly by two outside sources of in- 
come. Uncle Sam spends $150 million 
in the Territory annually and stations 
thousands of men in Hawaii's dozen 
vast military installations, since it is 
America's mid-Pacific defense bulwark. 
And as a renowned tourist paradise, 
the Islands attract over 50,000 visitors 
yearly. They spent $40 million in 1951. 

<»• With temperatures rarely varying 
from the 70's, Hawaii is an outstand- 
ing market for casual clothing, sports 
equipment and attire, automobiles, 
foodstuffs, and beer, but a poor mar- 
ket for hot cereals, heating equipment, 
furs, pajamas, hosiery, blankets, or 
anti-freeze. 

7. Hawaii's polyglot population has 
long been an adman's headache. It 
consists of the following (as estimated 
for 1 July 1952 by the Territory's Bu- 
reau of Health Statistics) : 

Race Pop. Percent 

Japanese 188,872 40.6 

Hawaiian 91,601 19.7 

Caucasian 68,600 14.7 

Filipino 62,777 13.5 

Chinese 32,052 6.9 

Other* 21,423 4.6 

All races 465,325 100.0 

'Includes Puerto Rican, Korean, Negro, Samoan. 

"Radio far outranks newspapers in 
surmounting language barriers," Hol- 
linger says, "and with the Islands 
spread over so many miles of the Pa- 
cific, it's a whole lot easier to deliver 



a radio signal than to deliver a news- 
paper." 

EiatlUt in Hawaii: Hawaii has 12 
stations: six in Honolulu, one in Wai- 
pahu. Honolulu Count) : three in Hilo: 
one in Wailuku, Maui, and one in 
Lihue, Kauai. 

The five principal radio stations in 
Honolulu claim they're heard in all 
parts of the Islands except the city of 
Hilo and that additional portion of the 
"Big Island" ( Hawaii Island ) that lies 
in the shadow of two towering volcanic 
mountains, Mauna Kea and Mauna 
Loa. each just under 14,000 feet. But 
KMVI. in Wailuku. and KTOH. in 
Lihue, claim greater popularity on 



their home islands and offer surveys 
to prove it. ( Hawaii Island is 225 miles 
from Honolulu; Maui Island i> 95 
miles away, and Kauai Island, 110 
miles.) 

In any case you can't cover Hilo 
from Honolulu, and the sponsor who 
depends on one station to blanket the 
Hawaiian Islands is going to lose out. 

Hawaii's isolation limits entertain- 
ment variety ( it's 2,000 miles from the 
mainland). And billboards are not 
permitted. So radio has extremely high 
listenership and is an advertising must 
with anyone trying to sell consumer 
goods there. In fact the Clark 1951 
survey showed 44.7% of the sets to 
be in use evenings, which is 6-7' i bei- 



p:lnl!llll!lllllllllllllllllll'llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll]lllllllll'!i;illlllli:m 

Tips on selling rich Hawaiian marhet 

1. Remember that 85.3'v of Hawaii's pop. is non-Caucasian : 
40.6% is Japanese. 

2 . You cover half of Hawaii if you cover Honolulu I 232.553 pop. out of 
465,325). But don't try to get that other half with one station. 

3. Hawaii is 2/9 size of Puerto Rico in pop. hut its 1051 retail sales 
of $522 million easily exceeded P.R.'s $370 million.* 

4. No billboards permitted in Hawaii, so forget outdoor. 

5. Hawaii's 3 leading "industries" are sugar, pineapples, and tourists. 
Latter are lucrative market for luxury goods. 

6. Hauaii is sports-mad. High school football for example will draw 
25.000 to Honolulu Stadium. Spot/casts get high ratings. 

7. Japanese- and Filipino-language programs enjo 1 ) great popularity. 
All but one station urge sponsors to use them. 

8. Most mainland network shows are taped. Soap <</«•/ as arc as 
popular here as at home. "Anything good ^.oes." 

9. Don't depend overly on surveys and ratings. They're feu and far 
between, dated, and conflicting. 

JO. Year-Wound temperature almost never varies from 70-77 . 
So don't ship any overcottls. 



*"Sales Management" estimate. 



12 JANUARY 1953 



35 



Hawaii lias 12 radio. 2 TV stations for 500,000 people 

(Languages used: English, Japanese, Filipino.. Hawaiian, some Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Samoan) 



STATION 


ADDRESS 


OWNER 


NETWORK 


WATTS 


KC 


RATES 
1 hr & 50 words 
Class A. 1 time 


REP 


KGMB* 


Honolulu 


Hawaiian Bcstng. System 


CBS 


5000 


590 


$I65$24 (20 sec) 
with KHBC 


Free A Peters 


KM 


Honolulu 


Advertiser Pub. Co. 


NBC 


2500 


760 


$112.50-$ 15 (30 


Katz 


KHOIVf 


Honolulu 


Aloha Bcstng. Co. 




5000 


1380 


sec) 
$1 10$ 1 3.75 


W. S. Grant 


K1K1 


Honolulu 


KIKI, Ltd. 




250 


860 


$7I.82-$6.4I (30 
sec) 


Tracu /Moore 
II csi. Radio 
Sales 


KPOAt 


Hoiiofufu 


Island Bcstng. Co. 


Don Lee 
MBS 


5000 


630 


$I35-$I5 


HoIIiuonerw 


KVLA 


Honolulu 


Pacific Frontier Bcstng. 


ABC 


IC000 


690 


$l50-$20 


A. J. Young 


Kllll 


Waipahn 

(Honolulu County) 


Rural Bcstng. Co. 




1000 


920 


$22-$6 


W. BUUUck 


KIIBC* 


Ifilo 

(Hawaii County) 


Hawaiian Bcstng. Systerr 


CBS 


1000 


970 


$l65-$24 (20 sec) 
with KGMB 


Free & Peters 


KILAt 


Hilo 

(Hauaii County) 


Island Bcstng. Co. 


Don Lee 
MBS 


1000 


850 


$40-$5.35 


Uollinabery 


| KIPAf 


Hilo 

(Hauaii County) 


Big Island Bcstng. Co. 




1000 


1110 


$65-$6.50 


W. S. Grant 


| KMVft 


Wailuku 

(Maui County) 


Maui Pub. Co. 




1000 


550 


$72-$8.IO 


W. S. Grant 


KTOHt 


Lihue 

(Kauai County) 


Garden Island Pub. Co. 




250 


1490 


$60-$7.50 


W. S. Grant 


Kft/WB- 
TV 


Honolulu 


Hawaiian Bcstng. System 


CBS 


500 


Channel 9 


$ 1 50 $ 15 (10 sec) 


Free & Peters 


MM I 
(TV) 


Honolulu 


Radio Honolulu, Ltd. 


Du Mont 


5000 


Channel 1 1 


$I50-$I5 (10 sec) 


For joe 



•Combination rates. For KGMB only deduct 15% 
tAloha Netwoik— KIPA. KTOH, KHON, KMVI. 
tlnter-Island Network— KPOA, KILA, $150 1 hr, 



for KHBC only deduct 75%. 

•200 1 hr Class A time. $25 for 50 words (1 time). 
$20 for 50-word chainbreak Class A (1 time). 



::mk i,:i;. M.: ;ii::. : :ii: .:i:: :;i:':::ii;- ;r :iir -ji:':::!!;- :m" :iii:::::!ii ii;. .;jm: :;iii;:!ii!-;:iu;:.:i^ :ii:!:-;:iii"[nn;Miiii: r i[ii!i: i'i: mi::;!I!!:-::;iii:-mii mm: :ii - ;i!i 'iiiir -imi:':;^!: ..hi :> :iin ::m: ■.. : :.n: :i!!" ,;:i: :m: ::;i: :::i; :i!i ::;ii'- :!!■ ,m- ::n: .;i. 'i: 1 . ,,ii / ; : ' :ii:" ill:.;, im' ;;ii:: iiii .in: iiim ii 



Hawaiian Market at a Glance 

(Market is bigger than Puerto Rico which has 
4Vi times the pop.) 



MARKET DATA 
Pop.— 465,325 (40.6% Japanese) 



Honolulu only 

Gross business 1951 

Retail sales 1951 

Total payroll 1951 

1951 commodity im- 
ports (95% from 
U.S. mainland) 

Territory family in- 
come 

Honolulu family in- 
come $6,706 



232. .153 

SI, 367,597.233 

$522,451,681 

$476,073,243 

$400,831,000 

$5,086 



RADIO & TV DATA 



12 

2 

1 19,000 



Radio stations 

TV stations 

Radio homes 

TV homes 6,»00 

Total homes 122,370 



SOURCES: Territorial Tax Commissioner. SR&D's Consumer 
i is 1952-53, Salei Management's Survey of Buying Power. 
Editor & Publisher's Market Guide. 



ter than the highest mainland figure 
for the record year of 1948. (See 
sponsor 14 July 1952, page 108.) 

The broadcast day starts early in 
Hawaii. With pineapple and sugar 
plantation men starting to work at 
6:00 a.m. and with banks, stores, and 
business offices opening at 8:00 a.m., 
early-morning radio is peak-audience 
radio in the Islands. Over a third of 
Hawaii's radio is in use at 7:00 a.m. 
And more sets are in use from 5:45 to 
6:00 a.m. than there are in the usual 
mainland peak morning strip of 11:45 
to 12 noon. 

Like people in mainland rural dis- 
tricts. Hawaiians go to bed early. By 
10:30 p.m. only 7.4% of sets are in use. 

Hawaii is sports-mad as the attend- 
ance figures at sports events and rat- 
ings of sportscasts prove. High school 
football draws 20.000 to 25.000 fans 
to mammoth Honolulu Stadium. Most 
local sports events are broadcast, not 
only those in Honolulu but throughout 
the Islands, lie-creations of Major 
League baseball and pro football games 
are highly popular, baseball especially 



because it is not only America's but 
Japan's national sport as well. 

Most Hawaiian stations emphasize 
that although Hawaii's predominant 
Oriental population is intensely Amer- 
ican in its thinking and buying habits, 
Japanese and Filipino-language pro- 
grams enjoy considerable local sup- 
port. The stations programing heavily 
in Japanese, like Hollinger's KPOA, 
quote surveys to show that 35% of 
afternoon listeners tune to Japanese- 
language programs. Since 40' J of Ha- 
waii's population is Japanese, this 
would mean that almost 90% of the 
Japanese listeners tune to Japanese 
daytime shows. 

KGMB, however, quotes the Clark 
survey to show that foreign-language 
programs not only don't have nearly 
as high listenership as general Eng- 
lish-language programs but that the 
majority of those speaking a foreign 
tongue don't listen to them. 

Ratings are few, outdated, or con- 
flicting. The last and only Hooper tele- 
phone survey was made in 1950, cover- 
( Please turn to page 54) 



36 



SPONSOR 



►JTI I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I ITT I I II I I II I I I I I I I in II I I I I I I ! ! I I TTTTTTTI I T I T T T T I I I I II I I I J 

z 

I Commercial couplets for '53 | 

z 


— 


... or the "ehroiiometric eliehe 


)" and how it can 


— 


•-• 
•-• 


put copy wr iters 


in I lie mootl for the new year 


z 


>-• 
■-• 
>-• 


M. hese verses were written by Lloyd Smith- 


ing out reams of rhyme in which they link 


•- 
•- 
•- 
•- 


~ 


son, v.p. of the Cincinnati agency, Smithson, 


the new year will) products being advertised 


•- 


~ 


Wyman & Withenbery, Inc. Why, you may 


— achieving a form of commercial couplet 


•- 


-• 


ask. It seems to Smithson that around the 


which is best described as the 'chronometric 


•- 


2 


start of each year copywriters are given to 


couplet'." For copywriters who may be 




>-• 
<-+ 
•-* 


"seething with weird creative frenzy, pound- 


groping for ideas here are some suggestions: 


•- 
— 

•- 


<— 

*-• 


Brink OLD CHLORETTE in '53- 


Stop counting sheep in '53 — 


•- 
•- 
•- 


— 


Get stinko inoffensively! 


Drop off to sleep with OVALTEA! 


•- 


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Use SERPO'S SNAKE OIL faithfully! 


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liisten to Fibber and Molly McGee 


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Wear STILT-STYLE SHOES in '53, 


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Use SCRAPO BLADES in '53! 


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With each pack, styptic pencil free! 


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Wear SNOBLEIGH FURS in '53! 


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12 JANUARY 1953 



37 



xo:;:ox-:->:'::>:::o:>v>:": 



Radio 



..... : : :v: : :':o: : : : : : : : :": : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :-: : : : : : : : : 
■. .-,■ ,-.■ ■,-.-, ,■ ■. .■.'.'.-.■.■.'.-.■.'. .-. .'.-, .■. .-.',-,■ -.-.■ 
o:o:v>:;:v:;:o:;:'>:;>>:v: : :o:::o: : :-Xv: : ;: : : : ;_:: 



. an d now a message 



hom out sponsot 



TV 



by Bob Foreman 



I 



am in an ideal position to take 
a contrary .stand on the following 
premise: Television has become a 
crushing harden to the advertising 
agency, sending agency overhead 
up to unstomachable heights. I 
am in this position because I have 
no actual facts or balance sheets to 
bear out my suspicion that tele- 
vision is not the blackamoor in the 
woodpile ascribed to it. Those who 
seem to be most vocal about TV 
upsetting the apple cart, I believe, 
are merely proving that there is 
agency mismanagement as well as 
departmental inability in their 
shops. I am equally convinced 
that television potentially is as 
good a money maker for the agen- 
cy as any other medium even if it 
is a bit harder to tame at this early 
date in its life. 

For these reasons I get a bit fed 
to the teeth, hearing agency people 
alone and in agency-type groups 
complaining about what television 
is doing to them. I'm quite confi- 
dent that the same belly achers 
were at work (many of them seem 
old enough) when radio reared its 
head, and I wouldn't be a bit sur- 
prised if a lew of them were 
around, complaining way back 
when barn paintings were replaced 
by the 24-sheet poster. 

The larger agency with sufficient 
personnel and a substantial enough 
bank account has been able to in- 
vest in television for the past five 
years, training itself to meet the 
new medium and win it over. 
Those who went at this, knowing 
the investment would pay off, are 
today well equipped to take TV in 
stride. In many shops the tele- 
vision operation and its denizens 
are not even considered sports to- 
day and thus relegated to some 
distant floor and discussed in 



hushed tones by the more sedate 
members of the group. When we 
look back on what was typical only 
a few years ago, we must admit 
that this is progress indeed. 

Whether this assimilation was 
the result of shrewd management 
or luck, I can't say, but anyone 
with even the dimmest crystal ball 
before him could see then and see 
far more clearly now that tele- 
vision advertising is becoming 
more and more the bellwether of 
the agency and the medium by 
which accounts are gained and 
strengthened or weakened and 
lost. So actually it was impossible 
to duck the medium no matter how 
hard the agency would like to have 
done so. 

There's also a service, worth 
considering, that TV has per- 
formed in the larger agency. For 
the younger element, it has pro- 
vided a place in the sun they'd 
never have been allowed to share 
for another decade and at the same 
time it has shaken loose some of 
the older, over-ripe folks who just 
couldn't get up in the morning to 
iace anything, however exciting 
and advertisingly important. 

On the other hand, there are 
many account men who have recog- 
nized television for what it is and 
means to our business and have 
taken the extra effort and added 
hours necessary to learn about it. 
It is this group which has helped 
make the big strides needed to 
turn a bastardized form of show 
business into a selling force. 

As for the small agencv, their 
top people, management or crea- 
tive or whatever they are, have 
had to turn themselves inside and 
out to master the medium them- 
selves, since they were unable to 
turn people loose on it before the 



billing warranted it. Today most 
of them have learned that the film- 
ing of advertising copy is the most 
difficult of all agency production 
feats and thus they now T know upon 
whom to rely to help them with 
this. By working closely with film 
producers who they've discovered 
can be trusted, they've gotten over 
the roughest part of the road. This 
close relationship has taught the 
film people a lot about advertising 
as well as the agency people about 
film. The end result is better com- 
mercials at lower cost with fewer 
remarks and, of course, sounder 



selling. 



The packaging of programs is 
still basically where it was in ra- 
dio — with the independents and 
the networks. The problems of 
time buying, though made more 
difficult than in radio by such un- 
happy phenomena as the one-chan- 
nel town, are still in the hands of 
the networks and local stations 
and their representatives. 

As for the billing, I realize a 
lot of TV dollars have come out of 
magazine budgets and newspapers 
and especially radio. On the other 
hand, advertising budgets are gen- 
erally higher since television and 
the medium because of its effec- 
tiveness must be partially respon- 
sible. So I can't see what all the 
shouting is about. TV is here. It 
works. It's an agency function. 
And just because it isn't easy is 
hardly reason enough to pass 
around the crying towel. 



commercial reviews 



TELEVISION 



SPONSOR: 
AGENCY: 
PROGRAM : 



Scott Paper Co. 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y. C 

"Omnibus" 



I never realized it was possible to be- 
come pompous over the subject of paper 
toweling but the above advertiser has 
achieved this state to an astonishing de- 
gree in the commercial presented on 
Omnibus recently. Starting off with the 
overbearing non sequitur that it is only 



38 



SPONSOR 



Advertisement 



T. V. story board 

4 column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

S A It It A 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICACO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




In a series of convincing I-minute *>|><>ts loi Bromo-Quinine Cold Tablets, 
SARRA uses ingenious photographic distortion to dramatize the misery of 
cold sufferers. "After" shots show glorious relief. The strong competitive 
message is delivered with ethical conviction and pictures ol the- package are 
animated by a blinking name. Produced with Gardner Advertising Company 
for The Grove Laboratories, Inc. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




This series of l-minute spots, created by SARRA for the Society for Savings 
in the City of Cleveland, is rich with human interest and homey warmth, yet 
does a strong job of institutional selling for the bank and its services. "Prod- 
uct" identification is accomplished effectively through a photograph of the 
bank building merging into the bank's seal. It shows the building and slogan 
which sums up the sales impression. Produced through The Griswold 
Eshleman Company. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




A series of 60-second commercials for Gerber baby and Junior Foods are 
seen on the Kate Smith Hour. They combine charming live-action shots ol 
babies with stop motion and shell displays ol the products. Gerber's trade- 
mark baby and slogan, plus a logo formed from child's building bloc ks, 
climax a sales-winning message with strong product identification. When 
used as spots SARRA'S Vide-o-riginal prints give the same clear reproduction 
as the master prints. Planned and produced b\ SARR \ under the direction 
ol D'Arcy Advertising Company for Gerber Products Company. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



12 JANUARY 1953 



39 




you con see the 
difference en WBNS-TV 




uibns-tv 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 
CHANNEL 10 



CBS-TV NETWORK • Affiliated with Columbus Dispatch and 

WBNS-AM • General Sales Office: 33 North High Street 

REPRESENTED BY BLAIR TV 



WBNS-TV's produc- 
tion facilities, avail- 
able to all adver- 
tisers, were . used to 
design this realistic 
Koolvent set . .°. an 
important factor in 
the convincing com- 
mercial viewed 
weekly by the large 
audience drawn to 
Mystery Theatre, 
Saturdays at 1 1 P.M. 



fitting and proper a company of such sta- 
ture as Scott be on Omnibus, we are then 
tossed into a market basket containing 
various paper products. 

One of these gets about a half-minute 
ride — in this case, paper toweling. We 
discover this item is ideal for wiping off 
pots and pans. All during this earth- 
shaking revelation, a voice-over announcer 
pontificates with about the same tone the 
opposition must have used when it read 
the Magna Carta to King John. And 
if these words caused the King to eat 
grass, let me say, the words I heard al- 
most caused me to do the same. 



s pon son : 


Pontiac 


agency: 


John MacManus & Adams, 




Inc., Detroit 


PROGRAM: 


Announcements 


PRODUCER : 


Transfilm, Inc. 



To introduce the new Pontiac, this auto 
manufacturer has utilized a goodly 
amount of footage, showing the car off 
to advantage while the sound track relates 
the usual list of improvements and fea- 
tures. Perhaps the most novel as well as 
most effective ideas in the copy are the 
use to which opticals are put, starting with 
the nicely relevant iris out from the out- 
line of the Pontiac Indian Chieftain's head 
into the commercial. Then too there are 
attention-getting zooms of the word 
"new" and attention-holding methods by 
which the theme line (Dollar For Dollar 
— You Can't Beat A Pontiac) moves opti- 
cally into position at the closing of the 
announcements. 

In some places the editing of the vari- 
ous shots of the car itself seems a bit care- 
lessly done, since abrupt changes of direc- 
tion take place while the car is in motion, 
creating a rather jarring effect. Other- 
wise, though, this copy is well thought out 
and well put together. * * + 



Do you always agree with Bob 
Foreman when lie lauds or 
lambasts a commercial? Bob 
and the editors of SPONSOB 
would he happy to receive 
and print comments from 
readers in rebuttal; in ire; in 
qualified agreement. Addre>* 
Bob Foreman c/o SPONSOB. 
510 Madison Ave. 



40 



SPONSOR 



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Stations 



\ KXtK-Great Falls 

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New York 17, N. Y. 
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Hollywood 28, Calif. 

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Chicago 1, Illinois 
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PLUS 

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KXLY-TV 

Atop Mt. Spokane Elevation 6018 ft. 



PERFUMES 



SPONSOR: Federal Home Products Corp. AGENCY: Direci 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The maximum allowable 

cost per order on a $1.25 item this sponsor was offering 
was 400. The item : a packet of Famous Brand Perfumes. 
The sponsor invested $360 in a schedule of announce- 
ments on KYW to push the offer. He pulled 2,459 pieces 
of mail containing orders, many for double and triple 
units at $1.25 each. The actual cost-per-sale came to less 
than 150, the lowest of any cost on several hundred sta- 
tions used by the advertiser, according to KYW. 



KYW, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Participations 




results 



MIGHT CLUB 



SPONSOR: Lounge Nile Club AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /„ December 1951, this 

night club launched a Monday-through-Saturday broad- 
cast from 11:15 p.m. to 12 midnight emanating directly 
from the club. The Lounge had been averaging about 30 
guests nightly; one month after the broadcast had started, 
some 100 people were crowding in each night. In Febru- 
ary 1952, the show was extended to 1 :00 a.m. Two locally 
popular WAEB d.j.'s [ivith turntable) make up the show. 
The club now has standing room only after 10:00 p.m. 



WAEB, Allentown, Pa. 



PROGRAM: Lounge Nite Club 
of the Air 



SINGING XMAS CARD 



SPONSOR: Filmer's Limited AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: At 8:15 a.m. daily, this sta- 
tionery store carries a short announcement over CHUB. 
Before Christmas, the dealer decided to plug "Singing 
Christmas Cards" — each actually a record — at a cost of 
$1.25 per card. The announcer simply played the "sing- 
ing card" on the air and said it could be obtained at 
Filmer's. The dealer had been wary about purchasing 
this type of card and had ordered only one gross. After 
the second announcement, the entire stock was sold, net- 
ting the dealer $180 for an ad cost of only $4.40. 



CHUB, Nanaimo, B.C., Canada 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



APRON OFFER 



SPONSOR: Okun Furniture I VGENCi : Direci 

CAPS! IK CASE HISTORY: Over a period of four 

weeks {June through 14 July), this store used run-of- 
schedule announcements offering a plastic apron free to 
shoppers who came in to look at Admiral refrigerators 
and electric ranges. Since the store is in a low foot-traffic 
location at the north end of the city, the sponsor estimated 
that 100 aprons would cover the demand. He did not 
expect that the air pitches would bring 1,340 persons into 
the store. Total ad cost was $200, less than 150 per lead. 

WTXL, West Springfield, Mass. PROGRAM: Announcements 



MAGAZINE OFFER 



SPONSOR: Kiplinger Washington 
Agency 



AGENCY: Albert Frank- 
< ruenther Law 



CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: To increase subscriptions 

to its Changing Times magazine, the Kiplinger Agency 
offers free copies of the publication. Late in 1951, Kip- 
linger bought six participations on WCBS' Jack Sterling 
program. Result: 3,868 replies, or an average of 645 per 
broadcast. In August 1952, three participations in one 
week on Sterling's show brought in 2,575 replies, or an 
average of 858 per broadcast. The sponsor was pleased 
with the show's increased pulling power. 



WCBS, New York 



PROGRAM: Jack Sterling 



COLD STORAGE LOCKER: 



SPONSOR: Your Food Bank 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This advertiser rents cold 

storage lockers for meats and wild game, also does curing. 
He has been advertising exclusively on KGHL for three 
years. When he recently plugged the cold storage lockers 
he had available for renting, within 30 days every one of 
the 250 empty lockers had been taken and he was forced 
to turn away some 25 people in three subsequent days. 
This is representative of the results this sponsor has been 
getting regularly on KGHL, at a cost of $50 a month. 



KGHL. Billings, Mont. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



CUSTOM KITCHENS 



SPONSOR: Burkeholder Custom Kitchens AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE ( VSE HISTORY: Auto listening has helped 

get out-of-town customers for this WOC advertiser (who's 
been using the station for 2 1 . •> years). One specific in- 
stance: A Clinton, loan, man. driving near Davenport, 
heard a Burkeholder announcement. He dropped into the 
Davenport store and told the Burkeholder people to con- 
tact his wife about remodeling their kitchen. Result: a 
$1,350 order. In addition, the Clinton man's brother 
bought a $1,100 custom-built steel kitchen from Burke- 
holder. Total result from the one pitch: $2,450 in sales. 



WOC, Davenport. Iowa 



PROt.l! \M: \nnouncements 





Where are the most creative rtnc! i»n«f/i tint ire ideas 
for TV commercials coming from — the older, more 
experienced writers or the yoimcjcr. newer talent? 



David Kiviat 



Director of Sales 
Frances H. Leggett Co. 
New York 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Mr. Kiviat 

Only a neophyte 
in the realm of 
ideas can believe 
in the separate 
and lonely Idea. 
Ideas are deriva- 
tive, they are of- 
^A ^ ten bred in the 

■l fi I ol two 

^^ ^J ipi more 1 1 i 1 1 1 ■ i < • 1 1 

Mr. Mead ideas. 

An account man 
has a yearning: "Why don't we put 
the snow man on the (Ivory Snow) 
package into a commercial?" Is that 
the idea? From this starting point. TV 
writers and artists may bring out a 
hundred different ideas for animated 
sequences, stop motion, live action, etc. 
A television idea is usually not an 
isolated, disembodied thing. It must 
contribute to the over-all campaign. 
Our Sugar Crisp hears first started 
as a print idea. For children's TV, we 
originated a special narrative tech- 
nique, using animation. Each animat- 
ed cartoon-story, completely designed 
by B and B animation art directors and 
synchronized to our own original mu- 
sic and lyrics, represented hundreds of 
"ideas." This narrative technique was 
then picked up by print, which used it 
in comic pages, adding, of course. 
inure ideas of their own. 

But to answer your question: Most 
of our creative and imaginative TV- 
copy ideas come from the TV writers 
and artist-. They're all "middle-young, 
mostl) in their late 20's or mid-oO's. 
Mosl of them have five to 15 years of 



experience in radio, film, or print copy 
— some in all three. 

Remember that a good TV copywrit- 
er must understand the techniques of 
animation, stop motion, live action on 
film, and live television — each one with 
an entirely different set of rules. An 
"idea" conceived without this ground- 
work is often not practicable. 

Ed Shepherd Mead 
V.P. and TV Copy Chief 
Benton & Boivles 
New York 

• Mr. Mead is the author i>f the reeent hook 
"Ho* i» Succeed in Business Without Really 
Trying?." 

My reaction to 
your question is 
so immediate, and 
brief, that per- 
haps a little back- 
ground on the 
method of cre- 
ating television 
commercials at 
Foote. Cone & 
Belding will save 
m\ repl) from 
appearing like a dogmatic "one liner." 
First of all. we have no television 
commercials "experts" in the agency. 
The agency's copy and creative people 
on any given account all contribute to 
the construction of our TV commer- 
cials, as well as radio commercials and 
printed advertisements. Such intimate 
account knowledge and day-to-day ex- 
posure to basic client problems is too 
valuable a commodit\ to ignore in fa- 
vor of a TV "specialist" — young-type 
genius, or old-type genius. 

So. based on the agency operation 
I am most familiar with, I can onl) 
answer your question this way: The 
best TV commercial ideas will, like all 





things creative, never be confined to 
any particular age group. The most 
exciting, dynamic, and effective TV 
commercials have and will continue 
to come from those who understand 
that television is a i>ts«a/-aural medium 
and can exploit it as such. 

George Wolf 

Director, Radio-TV Production 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

New York 



In television, too, 
creative and im- 
aginative ideas 
are where you 
find them. Gen- 
erally speaking, 
the pure, unin- 
hibited "idea" of- 
ten seems to turn 
up in the white 
heat of youthful 
exuberance. 
Trouble is, the pure "idea" frequent- 
ly lacks strength, durability, practical- 
ity, or some other important quality 
to make it work hard. The evolution 
of creative advertising is the growth 
of an idea into a selling tool. 

It takes youth to keep experience 
moving forward. And it takes experi- 
ence to guide creative youth. 

In the end. experience is not mea- 
sured in terms of passing years. A 
vouth who has learned to temper his 
ideas with practical selling is experi- 
enced. And the most venerable ad- 
smith who can spice sound selling with 
freshness and enthusiasm is certainly 
young, by advertising standards. 
Gordon E. Page 
Kadio-Tl Copy Executive 
Marschalk & Pratt Co. 
New York 



Mr. Page 



46 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Dennis 



I don't think your 
question can be 
answered in fa- 
vor of one side 
or the other. In- 
ventiveness be- 
longs to all ages. 
Ideas for TV 
commercials are 
like ideas for 
medicine, styles, 
inventions of all 
kinds. These ideas come to creative 
minds regardless of years. 

The younger, newer talents do not 
enter the television field with any more 
know-how than the more experienced 
writer — say a space writer or radio 
writer, a novelist or a dramatist. And 
just because he or she is younger in 
years, it does not mean that they are 
particularly gifted to create television 
commercials. Surely the youngsters 
will come up with good ideas, and for 
each good one, there will probably be 
a hundred impractical ideas. The 
"converted" more experienced writer 
will come up with probably less im- 
practical ideas and probably just as 
many grade A. number 1 commercials. 
Very often I interview people who 
say "I created such-and-such a com- 
mercial for this-or-that sponsor.' 1 Af- 
ter prodding a bit. the usual outcome 
is that starting with their basic idea, 
other writers, creative supervisors, ac- 
count executives, visualizers, anima- 
tors, directors, cameramen, set design- 
ers, all contributed so many facets to 
this "diamond" that no one can really 
lay exclusive claim to the successful 
commercial that became so well-known. 
These contributions came from all 
ages — some from the younger, newer 
talents — some from people with more 
years in advertising than the young- 
sters have lived; and everybody's con- 
tribution added a little more sparkle, 
a little more brilliance to the finished 
product. Actually, years don't count. 
I think good TV commercial ideas 
come from those people who have a 
keener sense of personal salesmanship 
— the me-to-you, over-the-counter busi- 
ness — plus a keener sense of displav 
and demonstration, plus a keener sense 
of showmanship. Some folks are born 
with these attributes . . . and others 
acquire them through study and work. 
And some don't get them at all. 

Frank Dennis 

Director, Radio & TV Continuity 

Ruth rau fj & Ryan 
New York 



Irs S/YOIV/A/G/A/ 

COL UMBUS,GEOXG/A/ 




Yes, Sir! There's enough snow on our TV screens 

to blanket an area almost as large as the cover- 
age-area of WRBL!! The BIG difference is 

RECEPTION — satisfactory reception, that is. 
In Columbus. RADIO is more effective than 

ever before. WRBL and WRBL-FM completely 
blanket the Columbus Trading Area. Tops in 

Share-of-Audience — Morning, Afternoon, Eve- 
ning. Number One in Ratings — 1 15 out of 163 

reported periods. 18.7% MORE COVERAGE 
than ANY OTHER Columbus advertising 

media. Nearing our 25th Anniversary, WRBL 
is FIRST— in POWER, in PROGRAMS, in 

PRESTIGE, in PROMOTION. 




12 JANUARY 1953 



47 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 



' i 



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gives 

FULL COVERAGE 

with its new 
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above sea level 

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/ 






THE MOST POWERFUL 

TV STATION IN 
CENTRAL NEW YORK 

see your Kptz Agency 

- •-Tin— rt-lij 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 

SYRACUSE . 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
A MEREDITH STATION 




agency profile 



Carl Riff rod 



Director of Radio-TV for Motion Pictures, 
Donahue & Coe 



48 



The night of 10 October 1943 was a memorable one for Carl 
Rigrod. Over DuMont's W2XWV, New York, he produced and 
directed a 45-minute program (which he had also written I designed 
to get New Yorkers to go and see the RKO movie "Behind the Ris- 
ing Sun." Thus, Carl scored a first in TV to match a similar score 
he had made by the first use of a transcription to promote a movie 
I RKO-Radio's "The Cat People") on radio. Having introduced the 
motion picture industry to radio and TV selling, Carl has been 
busy in the same vineyard for many years. 

People looked askance at Carl in the early days of video when he 
planned a heavy spot television campaign for Sunset Appliance 
Stores to sell TV sets. But Carl thought it very logical: "In those 
early days of TV few people got to look at home TV in privacy. 
Most times just turning the set on filled the house with guests. The 
plan must have worked, because we got as many as 200 phone calls 
during each show. And 70% of the calls were converted into sales. 
That's what counts." 

Carl is one of the clan of ex-newspapermen who are among the 
hottest supporters of air media today. A University of Missouri 
School of Journalism grad. he worked on a host of newspapers; at 
one time he had the imposing title of Acting Assistant Night City 
Editor of the New York American. Later he did publicity for Uni- 
versal Pictures. He joined Donahue & Coe in 1943. 

Getting people out of their living rooms and into the movie theatres 
is no easy task, and movie makers have long since come to the 
conclusion that spot radio campaigns are downright necessary. 
But it's a tricky product to sell. Says Carl: "During one minute or 
less you've got to reflect the entertainment value of this million- 
dollar-plus production. The type, appeal, stars, music — all this must 
be convincingly projected in a very brief time. And don't forget that 
each new picture means a new campaign, a new product."' 

In addition to three movie chains (including Loew's) Carl and his 
assistants do the radio and TV work for MGM and Samuel Goldwyn. 
Of the former, Carl says: "MGM produces enough pictures so that 
v/e can maintain a 52-week radio schedule in many markets. We've 
been on certain spots for years and I wouldn't be surprised if we 
had a lot of listeners who count on our regular transcriptions to give 
them a sample of the upcoming movies." 

When not busy promoting epics, extravaganzas, and horse operas, 
Carl and his wife and two sons are cliff-dwellers in Manhattan. * * * 

SPONSOR 




Tops in Seattle! 



Salemaker Jr. stands above the crowd in the 

big Seattle market. This thrifty spot plan makes 

a Jr. sized budget move merchandise like crazy. 

For complete details call or wire KRSC National 
Sales or our nearest representative. 




sells ALL the big 
Seattle Market 

Represented by: 

EAST: Geo. W. Clark, Inc. 

WEST: Lee F. O'Connell Co. 
Los Angeles 
Western Radio Sales 
San Francisco 



12 JANUARY 1953 



49 



NOW! GOOD TV 



in 



MOBILE ALA! 

WKAB-TV 

CHANNEL 48 

CBS-DUMONT 
NETWORKS 




captivafin' 

KABBY 

says: 



"20,000 television sets al- 
ready in Mobile — and 
they're still coming fast!" 

Also, remember . . . 



WKAB 



the High-Daytime 
Hooper Bargain! 



A.M. 



CALL 




COMPANY 



Offices in: New York • Chicago • Atlanta 
Los Angeles • San Francisco 

SOUTHERN REPS.: 
Dora-Clayton Agency, Atlanta 



What's New in Research? 



Out-of-home viewing acids eonsitlerubly to 
TV auilienee in N,Y.C. urea, Telepulse finds 

COMPARISON OF HOME VS. OUT-OF-HOME TV SETS-IN-USE 



Monday through 
Friday evening 


Home 
sets-in-use 


Out-of-home 
sets-in-use 


Total 
sets-in-use 


% increase 
added by out- 
of-home sets 


8-8:30 


58.6 


2.8 


61.4 


4.8 


8:30-9 


59.5 


3.3 


62.8 


5.5 


9-0:30 


58.1 


5.3 


63.4 


9.1 


9:30-10 


56.3 


5.0 


61.3 


8.9 


10-10:30 


51.9 


5.8 


57.7 


11.2 



Saturday evening 



8-8:30 


58.5 


3.8 


62.3 


6.5 


8:30-9 


59.4 


4.5 


63.9 


7.6 


9-9:30 


60.0 


4.2 


64.2 


7.0 


9:30-10 


59.2 


5.0 


64.2 


8.5 


10-10:30 


54.5 


5.2 


59.7 


9.5 



Sunday evening 



8-8:30 


60.2 


6.1 


66.3 


10.1 


8:30-9 


59.0 


5.7 


64.7 


9.7 


?>-9:30 


58.4 


4.5 


62.9 


7.7 


9:30-10 


56.4 


4.7 


61.1 


8.3 


10-10:30 


49.7 


3.0 


52.7 


6.0 



SOURCE: New York TelePuUe home and out-of-home TV audience, surveys based on 2,100 personal 
Interviews over the period of seven days (5-11 November 1952) 



Observations on chart 

In this breakdown, prepared by Telepulse especially for sponsor, out- 
oj-home and at-home viewing percentages are comparable, since they 
an- both based on o II home sample ami can therefore lie added 
together to obtain a total Tl audience figure. 

The time periods with the highest at-home Tl audience are Sunday 
evening 8-8:30; Saturday et'ening 9-9:30 <7/;r/ Monday through Fridin 
evening 8:30-9. The largest out-of-home TV audience levels are found 
on Sunday evening 8-8:30; Monday through Friday evening 10-10:30 
and Sunday erening 8:30-9 p.m. 

Generally speaking, the parentage of increase added by out-of-home 
Tl audience climbs a\ the erening progresses, except on Sunday 
which shows a reverse picture. 






50 



SPONSOR 






7 TO 8 A. M. 
IS PRIME TIME! 



And here is what a recent survey in Springfield by 
THE NEW ENGLAND COMPANY shows: 



TIME 


Radio 

sets 

in use 


WTXL 


Station 
"A" 


Station 
"B" 


Station 

"C" 


Station 
"D" 


Station 

"E" 


Station 
"F" 


Station 
"G" 


Other 


Mon. thru Fri. 
7:00-7:30 AM 


15.9 


16.3 


18.6 


13.9 


11.6 


11.6 


9.3 


7.0 


4.7 


7.0 


Mon. thru Fri. 
7:30-8:00 AM 


21.2 


18.4 


16.3 


18.4 


14.3 


12.2 


8.2 


6.1 


4.1 


2.0 



Base: 1621 telephone interviews between 7:30 and 8:00 AM, November, 1952. Recall 
questions used to determine 7:00-7:30 AM listening. A copy of the entire survey is 
available for use in YOUR agency. 




ONLY one Fulltime Independent Station serves Springfield, Massachusetts 



For avails and a look at the survey, call Larry Reilly at Springfield 9-4768 or any office of THE WALKER COMPANY 

12 JANUARY 1953 51 




I 



Can CBS* Sioraes earry the 
ball ayainst Berle, Sheen? 

How much of the big audience divid- 
ed between Milton Berle I NBC TV) 
and Bishop Sheen (DuMont) can CBS 
TV woo away with its new Tuesday 
night entry — comic Ernie Kovacs? 

Kovacs, who is also vying with NBC 
TV's morning Today show via a new 
cross-the-board 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. se- 
ries on WCBS-TV (as of 29 Decem- 
ber ) , has become one of the top-rated 
personalities in the metropolitan New 




Sponsors were SRO on Kovacs' WCBS-TV strip 

York area in less than a year. He 
brought his special brand of comedy to 
New York from Philadelphia where he 
reigned in the 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. 
strip on WPTZ for some time. It was 
the Today show which ousted him from 
that spot. (WPTZ is an NBC affiliate.) 
He comes to nighttime network TV 
from a 45-minute afternoon strip on 
WCBS-TV (12:45 to 1:30 p.m.) which 
had been booked solid sponsorwise. 
His new Tuesday night stint (which 
bowed 30 December) lias substantial- 
ly the same format as the daytime air- 
ing. For his zany, uninhibited shenan- 
igans, In- -till does not use a script. 
\iiilni does lie permit a studio audi- 
ence nor dubbed-in laughs, but relics 
completely on the home viewer's re- 
sponse. This, he says, is because he 
utilizes certain special effects for his 
which would be almost meaning- 



less to persons sitting in a studio, but 
are caught by the camera for the TV 
viewer. For instance, by using red 
and blue filters, he can give himself 
"'the fastest shave in the world"; he 
can make objects disappear and re- 
appear at will; other camera tricks en- 
able him to perform such feats as, for 
instance, swimming in a bottle. 

What the sponsorship setup will be 
on the Tuesday night show is any- 
body's guess at the moment. In his 
morning WCBS-TV strip, however, Ko- 
vacs has carried along some of the 
sponsors from his previous afternoon 
show and has acquired some new ones 
as well. Current bankrollers include 
Ferrara Confectionery Co., Libby's 
Frozen Foods, Burnett Puddings, 
Clearasil. * • * 



11 MM studio helps sponsors 
''personalize*' lir>e pitehes 

Advertisers using station breaks on 
WNBT, New York, have available a 
special studio equipped to help them 
"personalize" their pitches at a mini- 
mum of expense. 

Called "The House of Station 
Breaks," it is designed to give adver- 
tisers for have neither the need nor 
the budget for filmed commercials the 
opportunity to present live station 
breaks with a maximum of versatility 
and flexibility. It also affords an ex- 
perimental device for clients interested 
in trying out new commercial ideas. 

The "House" has the latest in visual 
equipment for the identification of va- 
rious products. A "window shade" de- 
vice provides a number of backdrops 
suitable for different products; special- 
ly designed sections of store fronts and 
interiors can be set up as desired; a 
completely outfitted kitchen unit gives 
the proper atmosphere for food, kitch- 
en and allied products; complete sets 
of titles — flip, crawl, and drum — and 
main other display set-ups help pro- 
vide other identifications. 

Sponsors can make their live presen- 
tations in 20-. 30-. 40-second. and one- 



minute lengths. Advertisers currently 
utilizing facilities in the "House of 
Breaks" include Robert Hall Clothes 
I who was the first advertiser to take 
advantage of the plan) , Premier Foods, 
and Coronet Magazine. 

Not only have advertisers found this 
method of presenting live pitches less 
expensive and less work, according to 
WNBT, but they have discovered that 
the effects obtained are much more 




Robert Hall pitch gives effect of real showroom 

natural than in carefully rehearsed 
filmed commercials. In the Premier 
Foods plugs, for instance, the actual 
cooking of various victuals occurs in 
front of the camera; the Robert Hall 
announcements utilize certain props 
and backdrops which make it seem 
that the locale is the actual showroom 
(see cut above) . 

In addition, says the station, the live 
plugs are flexible and easily adaptable 
to last-minute changes and revisions. 

• • • 

Mennen, new in town, uses 
radio to warm reception 

The Mennen Co. will not officially 
open its new plant in Morristown, N. 
J., till about May. But it has already 
started to promote good will and make 
itself part of the community life via a 
schedule of programs on the local radio 
station. 

As of 5 January, WMTR, Morris- 
town, has been carrying the Mennen 
Bulletin Board, a five-minute, three-a- 
week morning show giving a rundown 
of social activities in the communitj 
(Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8:15 to 
8:20 a.m.). All commercials on the 
program arc institutional; these and 
the linking of the Mennen Co. with 
local social life are designed to pave 
the wa\ for a warm welcome to the 
new neighbor-to-come. 

Mennen is moving its plant from 
Newark to Morristown for purposes of 



52 



SPONSOR 



expansion. The official opening of the 
new plant will be marked by a week- 
long celebration. 

The agency handling the Mennen ac- 
count is Kenyon & Eckhardt, New 
York; Basil Matthews is account ex- 
ecutive. • * • 

Briefly . . . 

The New York Chapter of Pioneers 
of Radio had a Christmas party on 18 
December at Toots Shor's in New York. 
Some 120 vets of the radio business — 
who've been in it 20 years or more — 
attended. Especially for the occasion, 
an ASCAP songwriter. Harry S. Mil- 
ler, prepared some appropriate paro- 
dies which the merrymakers sang. One 
of these ran ( to the tune of Happy 
Days Are Here Again) : 

Pioneers of Radio; 

The gimmicks come and gimmicks go 

But you still will hear the names you 

know; 
Pioneers at Radio. 
Kilbcycs, through carbon "mikes" 
We gave the public what it likes 
Through the "booms" and "busts" and 

storms and strikes; 
Pioneers of Radio. 
We tossed o\ir voices around, 
In ev'ry tone, pitch and sound. 
Long before the Si>onsor came. 
Our signatures had gathered lame. 
So, we really feel we've earned the name. 
Pioneers oi Radio! 



Bing Crosby, who owns a 46% share 
of the station, recently went (via snow- 
mobile) to the top of Mt. Spokane to 
inspect the new transmitter installation 
of KXLY-TV. That station expected 
to be in operation by Christmas, but 
was delayed by some weeks of bad 
weather, plus the fact that RCA sent 




Crosby visits KXLY-TV tower on 6,0C0-ft. peak 

them a Channel 13 transmitter which 
had to be converted for Channel 4 use. 
Probable on-the-air date is now 15 
January, according to manager Ed 
Craney. In photo above, Bing (in 
plaid jacket) observes the loading of 
equipment on a sled to be hauled up 
the snowy mountain. His voungest son. 
Lenny (seen to left of Bing). accom- 
panied him on the trip. * * * 




12 JANUARY 1953 



53 



HAWAIIAN MARKET 

{Continued from page 36) 

ing only Oahu, and is still used by 
some people. The most comprehensive 
audience stud) since was the territorial 
survey of Dan E. Clark. II & Associates 
late in 1951. Nine of 12 stations under- 
wrote it. KPOA and KILA had spon- 
sored one the preceding spring and did 
not participate. Meantime Woodrum, 
Came) 6> Staff, Ltd., does a periodic 
coincidental survey for its clients. 

Here is a sample list of sponsors 
who've been using radio in Hawaii for 
years: Cuticura, Mennen, Anheuser- 
Busch. Ford, Warner-Hudnut, Stand- 
ard Brands. Borden's. Broun & Wil- 
liamson Tobacco. Mm inc. Pertussin, 
Colgate, Pabst Beer. Blatz Beer, Best 
Foods, Sterling Drugs. Bulova Watch, 
Wildroot. P. Lorillard, Lever Bros., 
Schlitz Beer. Quaker Oats, General 
Mills. American Home Foods, Carter 
Products. Vicks, General Foods. Gen- 
eral Electric, American Safety Razor, 
Heinz. Norwich Pharmacal, Miles Labs. 

Tips: What these sponsors have 
learned and other tips that can help 
you use Hawaiian radio more effective- 
ly were culled b) SPONSOR in its sur- 
vey. A representative list follows: 

• Spot radio is an excellent buy in 
Hawaii if you're careful of station 
and time of day, says Adam J. Young's 
Paul Wilson. He says one of dangers is 
getting into a program already crowded 
with commercials. He estimates $500.- 
000 a year is spent on spot radio in 
Hawaii (not including network or lo- 
cal sponsors i and that this e\eeed- 
Puerto Rico, which has four and one- 
half times the population. 

• Asst. Head Timebuyer Dick Hur- 
ley of Compton says: "Determine the 
coverage patterns. Try to get a line on 
the radio homes in the islands. Put 
all the surveys together. There's not 
too much definite information." 

• Jacqueline Ruta of National Ex- 
port Advertising Service, who buys 
Hawaiian radio for Norwich Pharma- 
cal, Lever Bros., and Lambert, among 
others, finds block programing an im- 
portant point to consider. 

Here is what some of her accounts 
are doing in Hawaii: 

Lever Bros, (for Rinso, Pepsodent, 
Lux Toilel Soap. Surf. Lux Flakes, 
Chlorodent) : House Party and Lux 
Radio Theatre, network; Jim Ameche, 
Story Teller, local: Lucky Luck and J. 
Akuhead Pupule. the island's two most 



famous pidgin-English disk jockeys, 
and announcements. 

Borden's Instant Coffee uses an- 
nouncements. 

Electric \uto-Lite has Suspense from 
the network. 

Lambert Listerine has Ozzie & Har- 
riet on radio and TV and also runs 
radio announcements. 

Norwich NP-27 I foot remedy) and 
Esterbrook (pens and pencils I air Jap- 
anese announcements. 

(Note: Most mainland network pro- 
grams are transcribed: a few are short- 
waved. I 

• Ted Page. Hollingbery account 
executive, says: "The people there are 
starved for entertainment — anything 



4*Because in America our broadcasting 
facilities are on a commercial basis, tele- 
vision looms as a potentially great retail 
sales promotion tool. More and more 
stores are assigning generous advertising 
allowances to television." 

GEORGE HANSEN 

President 

National Retail Drv Goods Association 



good is popular. They're crazy about 
soap operas, especially the Japanese.'" 

• Jack Davis of Grant emphasizes 
Aloha Network is Hawaii's only true 
network, with stations on each of the 
four major islands. He points out that 
K.HON is the only station on 24 hours 
a day — with Al Wayne broadcasting 
from 12 midnight to 5:00 a.m. 

• Don Quinn, who used to be Ben- 
Ion & Bowles' timebuyer for P&G's 
Tide and switched to Dohertv. Clifford, 
Steers & Shen field last October to be- 
come head timebuyer. says he checks 
station facilities, program popularity, 
and audience composition. He uses the 
1950 Hooper. 

• Mysten and action-drama pro- 
grams are extremely popular, as are 
shows reflecting Hawaiian customs and 
habits, according to KGMB's Wayne 
Kearl. who's general sales manager of 
the Hawaiian Broadcasting System. He 
cites these KGMB programs as exam- 
ples of what Islanders like: Carl Heben- 
streit's Kini Popo l morning deejay I : 
Betty Smyser's Today in Hollywood: 
Joe Anzivino's Sports Parade, and Her- 
man \\ cdemeyer. 

A survey conducted for KGMB last 
March by the auto dealers of Hawaii 
indicated there were 56,000 auto ra- 
dios in the Islands. 

The station also points out that 
though it has a popular morning Japa- 



nese program conducted by Hoshi Ha- 
washida, it doesn't believe manufactur- 
ers of mass consumption products need 
advertise exclusively to racial groups in 
Hawaii but can achieve better results 
cheaper by using general programs. 
It cites the fact that the only signifi- 
cant foreign language newspaper in 
Hawaii is the Hawaii Times (Japa- 
nese I with 10,808 circulation, which is 
a penetration of onl\ 5' < . This typi- 
fies racial attitudes in the Islands, it 
says. "Regardless of race, Islanders 
want to be 'Americans'." 

KPOA's Hollinger has a different 
viewpoint. He says KPOA is affiliated 
with Japan's 124-station NKH network, 
thus can offer Japanese-language pro- 
grams of every type. These not only 
attract a large Japanese audience, he 
says, but boast such sponsors as Miles 
Labs., Best Foods, Anheuser-Busch, 
Colgate, General Mills, Pan-American 
World Airways, Pabst, and Sears, Roe- 
buck. KPOA's two daily Filipino-lan- 
guage programs underwritten by Is- 
land sugar and pineapple industries, 
respectively, draw ratings above the 
20 mark for KPOA on Kauai Island, 
where the ratio of Filipino population 
is highest. 

• G. P. Fitzpatrick, promotion 
manager of Free & Peters, emphasizes 
thai neaih all of Hawaii's consumer 
goods are imported from the mainland 
— which makes Hawaii vitally impor- 
tant to the American advertiser. 

• Jack Burnett, general manager 
of KULA, Hawaii's most powerful sta- 
tion ( 10,000 watts) , suggests that spon- 
sors let stations localize their copy. 
"Take advantage of merchandising 
available." he says. "Give radio the 
same chance that newspapers may have 
had in frequency and size of budget." 

"Hawaii offers a vast new market 
for products now having comparative- 
ly small sales here or no distribution 
whatever," Burnett says. He mentions 
the fact that some brands enjoy 80 to 
')()', of total sales in such fields as 
canned milk, cold cereals, peanut but- 
ter. "By employing an intelligent and 
intensified campaign, you can change 
this picture by radio." he adds. 

The reason for one-sided domination 
b\ certain products: Plantation stores 
used to limit their stocks to a single 
brand primarily to conserve space. 

• KGU's Owen Cunningham offers 
these lips: "Localize your approach. 
Use local commercial announcements, 
in most cases. Locallv written com- 



5-4 



SPONSOR 



mercials are more effective. Jse pro- 
duction spots, locally written and pro- 
duced. Use the Japanese language." 

• Hollinger adds this point: "Take 
note of the unusual listening habits in 
Hawaii. More sets are in use from 5:45 
to 6:00 a.m. ( 18.3', I than from 11:45 
a.m. to 12 noon I l!!.t>' < I. Daytime 
listening peak is 7:00-7:15 a.m. when 



35.0' 



of sets are in use. K\ 



listening peak is 8:15 to 8:30 p.m. 
when 44.7% of sets are in use. By 
10:30 p.m. only 7.4% are in use." 

• John D. Allison, national sales 
director of KHON and the Aloha Net- 
work, emphasizes that over one-third 
of the Islanders live on the outer is- 
lands, can't be reached by one station. 

• W. B. Meyers, vice president of 
K.IKI, advises sponsors to use good 
brochures and personal contacts, espe- 
cially among dealers, as follow-ups to 
their air advertising. 

• Arthur J. Sedgewick, v. p. and 
general manager of KAHU, Waipahu. 
Oahu, until he joined the executive 
staff of the Hawaiian Broadcasting Sys- 
tem (KGMB, KGMB-TV. KHBC) in 
December, sent these tips to sponsor 
for timebuyers: "Realize that no one 
station blankets the market . . . that to 
reach all segments you need language 
programs. Select the station that can 
do the best job (checking ratings 
against cost where possible). Try to 
get programs and/or spots with a 
sports flavor, if possible. Plan a cam- 
paign consisting, in part at least, of 
short saturation spots, programed so 
as not to conflict with outstanding 
shows on other stations."' 

• Dwight Mossman. commercial 
manager, KTOC. Lihue. Kauai Island, 
called attention to the ocean areas 
which prevent listeners from readilv 
traveling between the Islands for shop- 
ping purposes. To fly to Honolulu and 
back from Kauai costs $19.55, he says. 
This discourages shopping trips. 

• Richard E. Mawson. station man- 
ager, KMVI, Wailuku. Maui Island, 
also points up the advantages of using 
a local station to reach a local market. 
You can buy advertising in the Maui 
News and over KMVI in combination; 
Maui News Publishing Co. owns both. 

Radio programing: What do the 
Hawaiian stations concentrate on. what 
are some of their top shows, and who 
buys them? Here's an alphabetical run- 
down of the stations, starting with Hon- 
olulu, which answered sponsor's ques- 
tionnaire: 



KGMB, Honolulu : Carries partial 
CBS Radio Net schedule besides own 
local shows mentioned earlier. Time 
sold with KHBC, Hilo. P&G sponsor 
seven soap operas daily and the Jack 
Smith-Dinah Shore show. Colgate has 
Mr. and Mrs. North and Our Miss 
Brooks plus announcements. Lever 
Bros, was mentioned previously. Camp- 
bell Soup i* usinj: Uaeil Carson Says 
and also Club 15. R. J. Reynolds spon- 
sors Boh Hawk, My Friend Irma, 
Vaughn Monroe, and announcements. 
Liggett & Myers has Godfrey. Pan 
American Airways broadcasts 10 min- 



utes of news daily, while the Honolulu 
Sun -Bulletin sponsors the 6:15 p.m. 
news. KGMB's Japanese programing 
is on dail) 5:30-6:45 a.m. or 10 hours 
a week. There is one hour of Chinese 
and a hall-hour Filipino show weekly. 
KGU, Honolulu: Doesn't specialize 
but plans balanced program schedule. 
Uses English. Japanese, and Filipino. 
Station owned by Advertising Publish- 
ing Co., publisher of Honolulu Adver- 
tiser. Principal national sponsors are 
same largely as NBC's on mainland. 
Local sponsors are leading local or- 
ganizations and businesses. They use 



KPOA 



No. 1 in 
Hawaii 



because 



KPOA leads in more quarter-hour periods of 
the entire broadcast day than any other Hono- 
lulu station. 

KPOA's "Wake Up Hawaii," starring Lucky 
Luck, is the highest-rated of ALL programs, on 
ALL stations, on ALL islands, at any hour, day 
or night. 

KPOA, and sister station, KILA, Hilo, can be 
heard by more people in Hawaii than any other 
network or individual station in the Islands. 



fVise advertisers use 



KPOA 



5000 watts at 630 
HONOLULU 



HAWAII'S 

INTER-ISLAND 

NETWORK 



KILA 



1000 watts at 850 
HILO 



Managed by Fin Hollinger — Represented by Geo. Hollingbery 



12 JANUARY 1953 



55 




hfc 



Bird imitatiotns...thats slU you can do? 



11 



Oddly enough, some people take extraordinary things for granted. 

Like radio, for instance. 

Today radio entertains, informs and sells more people in more places at lower cost 

than any other medium in the entire history of advertising. 



Today there are 105,300,000 radio sets in the U. S. A. 
Virtually every home is a radio home- -and over half 
of them have two or more sets. 

The average American now spends more linn with radio 
than with magazines, TV and n< wsiia/nrs cumhined. 
No wonder advertisers invested more money in radio 
last year than ever befon ' 




Broadcast 
Advertising 
Bureau, Inc. 

BAH is an 

organization 

supported 

by independent 

broadcasters, 

networks and 

station 

representatives 

all over America 

270 PAKK AVE NEW YORK CITY 



56 



SPONSOR 



such shows as Symphony Hour, The 
Return of the Lurline (shipboard in- 
terviews), Primo Penthouse Sports, 
news, Bob Considine, Dangerous As- 
signment, Hollywood Theatre of Stars, 
Waltztime. KGU's best success story: 
Shell News, sponsored by Shell Oil for 
16 straight years. Shell uses no other 
station and no other medium in Ha- 
waii, has just renewed for 17th year. 
KGU is Islands' oldest station (19221. 
gets full column of plugs eaeh week in 
Sunday Advertiser, is NBC affiliate. 

KHON , Honolulu: Key station in 
Aloha Network (KHON, KTOH, Li- 
hue; KMVI, Wailuku; KIPA, Hilo). 
Programing built around personalities: 
J. Akuhead Pupule, Larry Grant, Dick 
Hunter, Disk Jockey Al Wayne who is 
on all night, and Don Chaimberlain. 
Also features two-hour Japanese Com- 
munity Hour program, a Filipino pro- 
gram, and a sports broadcast. Sport- 
caster Frank Valenti recreates baseball 
game of day from Western Union wire 
in summer and San Francisco Forty- 
niners' football games in fall and win- 
ter. J. Akuhead Pupule I J. Crazy or 
Stupid Fishhead, actually Hal Lewis of 
Brooklyn), was Hawaii's first disk 
jockey. Likes to kid sponsors. Larry 
Grant's Vagabond House and Note- 
book have long been "sold out." Sta- 
tion warns sponsors against bloopers 
of this type: Major advertiser recently 
ran a newspaper campaign in Islands 
slugged: "Change to winter oil now." 
Hawaii's average year-'round tempera- 
ture is 75°. 

KIKI, Honolulu: One of the two 
250-watters in Islands. Established 
1951. Specializes in news, music, and 
sports. Principal accounts include 
Pepsi-Cola, Nehi, San Miguel Beer, 
Irish Cabs, Transocean Airlines. Royal 
V. Howard is president. 

KPOA, Honolulu: Co-owned by J. 
Elroy McCaw and John D. Keating, 
station has developed programing for- 
mula based on personality disk jock- 
eys, sports, foreign-language features. 
Tops are Lucky Luck's Wake Up Ha- 
waii (5:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. six days 
a week), Christmas Early Show, Nita 
Benedict's Wishing Well, Carlos Rivas 
Sports Reel — all participations with 
first and last sold at Class A rates with 
KILA as second station in two-station 
Inter-Island Network. NHK I Broad- 
casting Corp. of Japan) programs 
broadcast 3 hours 15 minutes daily, 
Filipino-language programs 1 hour 45 
minutes daily. Lucky (Bob) Luck, 
gravel-voiced ex-Marine captain from 



Texas, vies with J. Akuhead Pupule 
throughout Islands as top disk jockr\ . 
Both outrate Godfrey. Here's sample 
of Lucky's pidgin English: "If you no 
can say somteeng good about noboddy, 
more better you no say notteng!" 
KPOA also broadcasts four hours of 
mainland programs shortwaved from 
San Francisco daily. Established 1946, 
it's Don Lee-Mutual Networks affiliate. 
KULA, Honolulu: ABC, 10,000- 
watter specializes in block-programing: 
soap operas and allied program morn- 
ings until 12:30 p.m., solid "adventure 
hours" — juveniles — 6:15 p.m. to (".Mill 



I >. in., and mysterj -drama l ill 10:00 p.m. 
Afternoons given over to Arthur Gaeth 
with 12:30 and 6:00 p.m. news report; 
\ cm Bari's Something l<>r the Ladies 
and Hale Kula (House of Gold I . 
Joe Rose's major-league baseball in 
season, and Gordon Burke's sport news. 
Saturday is all language: Japanese 
1 I ' 2 hours (also six hours Sunda\ I, 
two hours Filipino I plus two hours 
Sundays), Korean 30 minutes. Chinese 
30 minutes. Station sa\s 35$ <>l Jap- 
anese-origin population said in survey 
they preferred Japanese-language pro- 
grams over English, but station cau- 



for quick, easy reference 
to your copies of 

SPONSOR 

get the durable new 
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looks like a million 



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Address — - 

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12 JANUARY 1953 



57 



tions against depending on language 
broadcasts alone. Sunday daytime pro- 
graming is language again, as indicat- 
ed. Sunda\ evening is solid block of 
news, commentators, and discussions 
shortwaved from mainland — Pearson, 
Winchell. Taylor. Town Meeting. 
Crossfire, and. locally, Arthur Gaeth 
as m.c. KULA says its block-program- 
ing is so successful other stations are 
imitating it. 

KAHU, Waipahu: Ten miles from 
Honolulu, station celebrated second 
birthday last September. Features mu- 
sic, news, and community service pro- 
grams. Languages used: Japanese, 26 
hours a week: Filipino, 15 hours a 
week; Chinese, one hour every Sun- 
day; plus two Hawaiian music shows 
a day, a Latin American 15-minute 
program once a week, a weekly half- 
hour Samoan program, an occasional 
Puerto Rican musical show, and The 
Nisei Hour, one-hour weekly show 
aimed at younger Japanese-Americans. 
Sponsors are local. 

KMVL Wailuku, Maui Island: Part 
of Aloha Network. Specializes in lo- 
cal programing with emphasis on lo- 
cal news and special events. Also 
broadcasts programs produced by 



NOW— TV 
IN HAWAII 




KON 




IN 






IN 


HAWAII 






POWER 


1 


cea 


ed 


for 



123kwERP Video 
74kw Audio 

POWER IS IMPORTANT 
to reach ALL the Islands 
Although Hawaii TV is less than 
two months old, set sales already 
have skyrocketed to over 8,000. 
Reach this rich half-million popu- 
lation market with KONA, Hono- 
lulu. Complete UP, INS, Local 
News. Dumont Network. 

ASK FOR JOE 



schools, churches, and other civic and 
community groups. Lses eight hours 
Japanese weekly, three hours Filipino. 
Principal sponsors local. Example of 
how station of this type can pull: 
Larro Feed arranged to give away 
5.000 baby chicks to customers of 
A&B Stores. A 50-word announcement 
was broadcast Friday afternoon, Fri- 
day night and Saturday morning. Be- 
fore store opened at 8:00 a.m. Satur- 
day. 1.000 customers were lined up 
outside. Entire supply of chicks was 
exhausted within two hours. 

KTOH, Liliue. Kauai Island: Anoth- 



*>'Tlie job of the advertising agency is 
to bridge the gap between the broad- 
caster and advertiser — between the 
broadcaster on the one hand (who seeks 
money and programs to operate his 
station) and the advertiser on the other 
(who seeks customers for his products 
and services and has the money to find 
those customers.)" 

FREDERICK R. GAMRLE 

President 

4A , s 



er Aloha Network station although lo- 
cally owned. Specializes in local pro- 
grams in English, Japanese (one hour 
daily I, Filipino (one hour daily). All 
high school football, baseball, and bas- 
ketball games broadcast. Fishing con- 
tests, golfing, little league baseball cov- 
ered. Can it pull? Italian Swiss Col- 
ony Wine Song Contest aired on Fili- 
pino program required wine labels as 
ballots. In last six-month period label 
count averaged 1.500 a month. 

Others: KILA, Hilo. carries much 
the same programs as KPOA, Hono- 
lulu; KIPA. Hilo, is fourth station in 
Aloha Network, and KHBC, Hilo. re- 
lays KGMB (CBS) programs, mixed 
with local shows. 

Television: Television has come to 
the Islands and undoubtedly will af- 
fect radio listening in and around Hon- 
olulu as drastically as it has in the 
States once the sets build up. KONA. 
Honolulu, was on first — 18 November 
and KGMB-TV debuted 1 Decem- 
ber. KONA went off temporarily about 
20 November when its audio over- 
lapped AM KPOA. whose power it 
was using. But it returned to the air 
16 December and is now broadcasting 
from its own tower with its five KW 
GE transmitter stepped up to 30, 000 
watts, according to Joseph Bloom, pres- 
ident of Forjoe. station rep who has 



just returned from Hawaii. Station 
will soon be up to 123,000 watts. Bloom 
said, to give it coverage in the outer 
islands. 

KONA. which means "southwind" 
in Hawaiian, features Webley Edwards' 
Talent Show (he is m.c. of radio's Ha- 
waii Calls), KONA Kiddie Kar nival, 
news, sports. DuMont Network features 
like Bishop Sheen, also Popcorn Thea- 
tre (Westerns I and Candle Light The- 
atre. Chinese and Japanese-American 
shows will be carried Sundays. Gen- 
eral manager is George H. Bowles. 

KGMB-TV began with 30 big-name 
programs on its schedule drawn from 
CBS (basic), NBC. and ABC. Shows 
range from Abbott & Costello to Stu- 
dio One and are kines or films although 
live local programs are being built. 
Packard Motors has just bought the 
film-showing of President-elect Eisen- 
hower's inauguration. Film will be 
flown to Honolulu and telecast on 
Channel 9 25 January. Lambert Phar- 
macal is sponsoring Ozzie & Harriet 
I also on radio). National Export Ad- 
vertising Service is export agency for 
both sponsors. Maxon is Packard's 
domestic agency and Lambert & Feas- 
ley is Lambert Pharmacal's. C. Rich- 
ard Evans is KGMB-TV's v. p. and gen- 
eral manager. 

Writing to sponsor of his recent 
shift to Hawaii from KNXT, Los An- 
geles, the Hawaiian Broadcasting Sys- 
tem's Wayne Kearl said: "I have been 
impressed by the Hawaiian market. 
Per capita income is high. Family in- 
come is among the highest in the U.S. 
Cars registered are terrific proportion- 
ately. Quality index is well above the 
U.S. average. Food and drug retail 
sales are considerably higher than in 
many comparable mainland markets. 
All this means that Hawaii is not only 
a land of beauty and hula girls, but 
also a modern, as well as a prosperous 
market." 

To the tourist the "Story of the Is- 
lands" can often be summed up in 
five words: malihini. newcomer or 
tourist; wahine, woman; okolehao, the 
native beverage; pilikia, trouble; pau, 
finished, done, the end. 

But the agency which has discovered 
the power of Hawaiian radio and the 
richness of its markets is more inclined 
to sa) to its clients: 

"Hauoli mau i na la apau. Make- 
make au ia oe ianei!" 

("Having wonderful time. Wish you 
were here!") * * * 



53 



SPONSOR 



^ornr* 



A 



* 




AMERICAN PUBLIC 



§ fSL#l 




In some countries products are endorsed by the 
Crown, and bear the arms of the royal family. 
That gives them prestige which stimulates sales. 

But in democratic America our products are 
endorsed solely by the approval of the American 
people, and are identified by brand names and 
trademarks that have won esteem the hard way. 

Here every product must stand on its own feet, 
and fight for survival in the intense competition 
of the market place. 

Here there is no easy road to popularity or 
leadership— no suggestion from government as to 
what you shall buy or what you shall pay. Under 
our brand system, which is the very keystone in 
the structure of our free economy, people can 
separate the wheat from the chaff and make their 
purchases solely on the basis of merit and appeal 
to their personal tastes and preferences. 



Our system of brand names and advertising is 
important to the American way of life for two 
other basic reasons: 

1. It develops broad markets for our goods, which in 
turn stimulate volume production. As a result . many 
conveniences that would otherwise l>e luxuries can 
be sold at prices almost everyone can afford. 

2. Brand competition spurs our manufacturers to 
greater efforts to please us. And this results in con- 
stant product improvement and the birth of many 
new products to add to our comfort and happiness. 



Getting this story across, simply, clearly, is an 
important job — a task that calls for the concen- 
trated efforts of all who have a stake in the success 
of manufacturers' brand names. 



INCORPORATED 
A NON-PROFIT EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION • 37 WEST 57th ST., NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



12 JANUARY 1953 



59 



POLITICAL COVERAGE 

[Continued from i>age 33 ) 

the sponsors, especially Westinghouse. 
With the help of Betty Furness, West- 
inghouse really got its name across. 
After the Republican Convention, our 
dealers began asking us, 'What are 
yon guys going to do now?' ' 

\ large distributor, who does not 
cany any of the lines advertised on 
the air during the conventions and 
election returns, told SPONSOR: "There's 
no question but that the sales impact 
of the convention was tremendous." 

As often happens in heavy promo- 



tional campaigns, the entire industry 
got a lift out of the convention and 
election sponsorship. The Radio-Tele- 
vision Manufacturers Association re- 
ported that the convention and politi- 
cal campaign promotion "unquestion- 
ably stimulated" sales of radios and 
TV sets. 

In other lines, too, the sales picture 
indicated that politics was helping to 
sell appliances. Up to June 1952, 
laundry dryers were 4% ahead of the 
previous year, measured by manufac- 
turers shipments; by the end of Octo- 
ber, the figure was 21%. 



ierever you 



o there's 



You're riding a winner on 
WGR ... for it's the most 
listened-to radio station 
throughout Western New 
York, Northwestern Penn- 
sylvania and Ontario. 







RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 

National Representatives: Free & Peters, Inc. 



Leo J. ("Fitz") Fifzpafrick 
I. R. ("Ike") Lounsberry 



For electric refrigerators, shipments 
for the first six months of 1952 were 
'XV , behind the comparable period of 
1951; by the end of October, ship- 
ments were 16?c behind. Although 
the pickup in refrigerator sales began 
in June, the following convention 
month was the best refrigerator month 
of the year for the industry. Monthly 
home and farm freezer shipments were 
behind 1951 for the first four months 
of 1952. Shipments jumped ahead in 
April, remained ahead through the next 
six months. 

Since early August the TV set in- 
dustry has been enjoying a boom that 
is reminding everybody of the lush 
sales in 1950, when nearly 7.5 million 
sets were sold, a record that's not ex- 
pected to be beaten for some time.. 
While new TV stations (or the promise 
of them) has sparked sales in certain 
areas, the big selling figures are being 
raked up in "old" TV markets. Set 
inventories dropped from 480,000 in 
June to 80.000 in October. 

The appliance industry needed the 
lift it got out of second half of 1952 
sales. While all the figures are not in. 
retail sales estimates by Electrical 
Merchandising magazine indicate that 
the industry will be doing well if it 
equals its 1951 figure. The magazine's 
estimate of 1952 retail sales of all 
electrical appliances, including radio 
and TV sets, is $6,041,650,000. The 
final 1951 figure was $6,169,395,000. 

While everyone interviewed agreed 
that appliance sponsorship of conven- 
tions and Election Night boosted in- 
dustry sales, opinions differed about 
the degree of help such sponsorship 
gave. Some said that appliance sales 
were due for an upturn in the fall of 
1952, anyway; that the consumer had 
remained away from buying appli- 
ances just as long as he could and 
was returning to "normal" buying 
habits. It was also pointed out that 
many of the appliances which showed 
increases over 1951 were riding up- 
ward on a long-term sales curve be- 
cause of low market saturation. These 
include such items as freezers, laundrv 
dryers, and deep-fat fryers. 

As for the appearance of allocations 
in the latter half of 1952, the industry- 
lias been en allocation on and off since 
the end of World War II. Even GE, 
whose aoi'liance >alc> slumped marked- 
ly in 1952. put many appliances on 
allocation as soon as they began to 
move more briskly last fall. 

The main reason for allocations are 



60 



SPONSOR 



RADIO 
PROFIT 





i 







M' 



Q 



There's nothing "big shot" about any of us. We don't try to give 
you a lot of statistical mumbo jumbo and big talk about our abilities 
to sell your client's products on our stations. We're the so called 
"small people" . . . the workers . . . the producers of sales. We're 
the people who work day and night to make it possible that your 
client's messages are properly directed to the millions of people we 
serve and who depend upon us for news, sports, mystery, drama, 
music, children's programs . . . yes, for information and entertain- 
ment for every age. 



IHAZLETON, PA. NBC-MBS ALLENTOWN, PA. CBS BLOOMSBURG, PA. BIDDEFORD-SACO, ME. MBS-YANKEE 

(Repiesented by Robert Meeker Associates). (Owned and Operated by Harry L Magee). (Represented by Edward Devney). 



1000 WATTS 



Charleston's most far reaching station 




"PAL for me, in '53"! 

That's a good slogan for you timebuyers to 
remember, when you want to sell the Coastal 
Carolina market. 

Programming to the Negro audience (50'< 
of the population), plus the vast group of 
people who listen to hillbilly music, WPAL 
gives a tremendously large segment of the 
audience, at rock-bottom prices. Check your 
Hoopers — and your rate cards. 

Tried-'n'-true personalities sell, and sell your 
product — all day long. 

Money's to be made here in Coastal Carolina 
— and I'm just the doggy to do it for you. 

Make your slogan: "PAL for me, in '53"! 

Happy New Year! 



Forjoe and Company 
S. E. Dora-Clayton Agency 



of CHARLESTON 
SOUTH CAROLINA 



All this and Hoopers too! 



CBS 



IN THE LAND 



GREEN BAY 



5,000 WATTS 



^rtowto been a S^nonsor J^rappu 




acreage 



olunie + 



1,000 WATTS 
SAVANNAH, GA. 

A "Dee" Rivers Station 
Call Forjoe or Stan, Inc., Atlanta 



the demands of the Armed Services. 
Last year the radio-TV industry 
shipped civilian production valued at 
$1.5 billion and military production 
valued at $2.5 billion. 

How the audiences were shared: 

No detailed breakdowns of the radio- 
TV audiences reached by each sponsor 
during the conventions and Election 
Night were published by any of the 
rating services. However NBC put 
out a series of releases which claimed 
that, based on Nielsen studies, it 
reached more homes for Philco during 
the convention than CBS did for West- 
inghouse or ABC for Admiral. 

The whys and wherefores of this 
greater share of audience will prob- 
ably remain in dispute for years to 
come. It can be pointed out, however, 
that, so far as TV was concerned 
( where NBC's audience superiority 
was most evident), NBC had greater 
station coverage. While the number of 
stations varied greatly during the con- 
ventions, NBC's telecast was generally 
carried on from 42 to 47, stations, 
while CBS used 34 to 39 (Westing- 
house also had three to four DuMont 
stations) and ABC used 13 to 15. 

One group of figures NBC released 
covered average minute audiences dur- 
ing both conventions on radio and TV 
combined. CBS and ABC were not 
identified by name but there was no 
doubt who the "second" and "third" 
networks were. 

Here are the figures: 

Day sessions - - NBC, 3,569,000 
homes; CBS, 2,532,000; ABC, 1,143,- 
000. 

Evening sessions— NBC, 3,995,000; 
CBS. 2.612,000; ABC. 1,364,000. 

In a separate release on television 
coverage alone during the conventions, 
NBC's rating study of the Nielsen TV 
Index showed that DuMont audiences 
on an average minute basis ranged 
from 180.000 during the daytime 
G.O.P. sessions to 346.000 during the 
evening G.O.P. sessions. 

NBC based its Election Night claims 
on preliminary figures in a 10-city 
comparative Trendex rating covering 
viewing from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. The 
figures, NBC said, showed it reached 
more TV viewers than any other net- 
work with a 3')' , share of audience. 

ISearlu ecertibtulu (lined in: The 

total figures on radio-TV listening to 
both conventions are truly impressive 
(see charts, page 33). They also reveal 



62 



SPONSOR 



OF BARBED WIRE, INCOME 



and early risers 




The barbed wire which sings in the wind 
of the Texas Panhandle is right at 
home. Back in 1882 one J. F. Glidden got 
tired of punching cattle all over the horizon. 
He noticed that longhorns instinctively 
seemed to give the thorny cactus a wide 
berth so he added barbs to the fence on his 
Panhandle ranch and barbed wire was born. 

The fence which stands around Amarillo 
is a boon to South Texans, protecting them 
from the cold North Wind. It also serves 
the citizens of the Panhandle, helping to 
make possible the largest cattle auction in 
the world, giving dudes something to catch 
their Levis on, affording cowboys employ- 
ment nursing a million head, wearing down 
the open range, reducing the need for that 
sacred instrument, the branding iron. 

The brand KGNC — burned into the daily 
habits of a million or more inhabitants of 
78 counties in Texas, Colorado. Oklahoma, 
New Mexico and Kansas by 10.000 watts 
of power and 30 years of regional and na- 
tional programming • — represents riches 
which dwarf even the fabulous King Ranch. 
Gross cash farm income for the area 



amounted to $925 million last year. 

With the highest per capita retail sales 
in the nation, Amarillo owes much to its 
vast trading area, its surrounding gas and 
oil fields, wheatlands, ranches and farms. 
Transportation hub of transcontinental rail, 
bus, and air lines, Amarillo is close to the 
stuff an advertiser looks for when he wants 
business. And it helps to look for it early: 

A couple from the Panhandle, in town for 
a combination vacation and shopping tour, 
registered at an Amarillo hotel. The clerk 
politely inquired if they wanted to leave a 
call. 

"No thanks," said the husband. "We'll 
just sleep right on through till sunrise." 
KGNC signs on at 5:30 a.m. 

KGNC-TV signs on early in the spring of 1953. 



KGNC 



Amarillo 




NBC AFFILIATE 



710 KC 



10,000 WATTS 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE O. L. TAYLOR COMPANY 



interesting listening and viewing pat- 
terns. With the growth of TV, these 
patterns will probably never be re- 
peated in quite the same way, but to 
the convention sponsors they offer a 
primer on broadcasting's power of 
penetration in U.S. homes. 

Although the conventions occurred 
six months ago, most of the material 
below has not been published before. 
For this reason, sponsor presents some 
detailed figures: 

In the matter of homes reached, as 
pointed out earlier in the article, nine 
out of every 10 radio homes (which 
means total U.S. radio and TV homes) 



were tuned in to one or both conven- 
tions at some time. The figures are 
40.186,000 listening and viewing 
homes out of 43,849,000, based on a 
Nielsen percentage of 91.6. 

According to Nielsen, there was a 
greater percentage of TV homes view- 
ing (or listening to) the convention 
than radio homes or radio-only homes. 
As chart No. 1 (page 33) shows, the 
TV home percentage was 95, compared 
to 72.7 and 89.3 for all radio homes 
and radio-only homes, respectively. It 
should be noted that the 95' r figure 
is a Nielsen estimate. It shows the per- 
cent of TV homes which listened to TV 




WDAY 

(FARGO, N. D.) 

IS ONE OF 

THE NATION'S 

MOST POPULAR 

STATIONS! 

An independent survey made by stu- 
dents at North Dakota Agricultural 
College among 3,969 farm families in 
22-countv area around Fargo proved 
is: WDAY is a 17-to-l favorite over 
e next station — is a 3V2-to-l favorite 
ver all other stations combined! 



NBC • 5000 WATTS 
970 KILOCYCLES 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 
Exclusive National Representatives 



and radio and does not separately 
break down TV viewing exclusively. 
However, Nielsen is convinced that the 
total number of TV homes reached by 
TV was above 90 % . Here is how 
Nielsen reached that conclusion: 

1- Nielsen knew that one radio net- 
work reached 38' '< of all radio homes 
during one convention. 

2. Nielsen also knew that all radio 
networks reached 72.7 of all radio 
homes during both conventions, or 
roughly twice as many homes (see 
Chart 1, page 33 I. 

3. The Nielsen people knew that one 
TV network reached 71.6% of all TV 
homes during one convention. 

Therefore, it is easy to see that, 
while it would have been impossible 
to double the 71.6'v figure, the per- 
centage of TV homes listening to TV 
must have been somewhere in the 90's. 
Furthermore, since the radio figures 
also include MBS ( whose coverage 
was not sponsored by any of the appli- 
ance firms ) , the percentage of TV 
homes reached by the appliance spon- 
sors was even greater than the radio 
homes percentage than is indicated in 
Chart No. 1. 

The greater convention interest 
among TV homes is made clear in 
Charts 2 and 3 (page 33). Chart 2 
shows that the greatest average tune- 
in time during the conventions was in 
TV homes — 28.1 hours. Note also that 
while half of the TV homes tuned in 
to radio, the average radio tune-in 
time was only 4.3 hours. Even in 
radio-only homes, the average tune-in 
time was a little more than half the TV 
homes figure. This indicates a higher 
relative exposure to commercials 
among TV set owners. 

Chart 3 is simply the result of multi- 
plying the homes figures in Chart 1 by 
the corresponding average tune-in 
time in Chart 2. It shows that the 
gross amount of listening and viewing 



D0THAN. ALABAMA 



5000/560 

NON-DI RECTION AL 



National Representative I Southeast 

Sears and Ayer I Doro-Clovton Aaency 



64 



SPONSOR 



IN 
TULSA 



THE PULSE, INC. 



100% YARDSTICK 



Radio Station Audiences by Time Periods 



THE PULSE OF TULSA 

November, 1952 



MONDAY 



FRIDAY 



Station 




6 AM- 12 Noon 


12 Noon -6 PM 


6 PM-8 PM 


KVOO 




34 


40 


42 


"B" 




20 


22 


27 


"C" 




19 


16 


15 


"D" 




13a 


8a 


* 


urn 




7 


6 


6 


llrll 




5 


5 


4 


Misc. 




3 


3 


5 


Total Percent 


100 


100 


100 


Average 


Va. hour 








Home using radio 


19.1 


20.8 


23.7 



"a" Does not broadcast for complete six hour period and the share of audience is un- 
adjusted for this situation. 

* Not on air 

These figures are percentages indicating the relative popularity of the stations during the day. The base, 
total station quarter hour mentions, is the sum of the number of stations listened to during the periods. 
This base, divided into the total mentions of each station gives the figures listed above. 

* * * 



KVOO leads substantially in every quarter hour covered by this Pulse Report save one, and in this quarter 
hour one other station merely equals the KVOO share of audience. 

See your nearest Edward Petry & Company office for the complete data and for KVOO availabilities. 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



1 



50.000 WATTS 



12 JANUARY 1953 



NBC AFFILIATE 

EDWARD PETRY AND CO., INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA. 



65 




PINPOINT 
YOUR 

PERSISTENT 
SALESMAN 



HOOK ONTO THE 
PROSPEROUS 
SOUTHERN 
NEW ENGLAND 
MARKET. WJAR-TV 
MEANS UNDUPLI- 
CATED COVERAGE 
IN 240,000 HOMES 
WITH PERSISTENT 
SELLING TO MORE 
THAN 720,000 
PEOPLE. 



WJAR-TV 

PROVIDENCE 



&WOKEW 




in TV homes was greater than the 
gross figures for radio-only homes. 

Even taking into account the radio 
listening in TV homes, the figures indi- 
cate that the gross amount of TV view- 
ing was greater than the gross amount 
of radio listening. This, despite the 
greater number of radio-only homes. 

How does this listening and viewing 
compare with regular radio and TV 
program audience levels? Total con- 
vention audience figures don't offer a 
good basis for comparison, but half- 
hour audience peaks during the con- 
vention might. Here is what Nielsen 
discovered about peak convention 
audiences: 

1- For radio, during the G.O.P. Con- 
vention: 7,576,000 homes, 2:00 to 
2:30 p.m. Friday 11 July, towards the 
end of final balloting. 

2. For TV, during the G.O.P. Con- 
vention: 8,655,000 homes, 10:30 to 
11:00 p.m., Thursdays 10 July, during 
the nominating speeches. 

3- For radio, during the Democratic 
Convention: 8.675,000 homes, 2:30 to 
3:00 p.m., Friday 25 July, during the 
first balloting. 

4. For TV, during the Democratic 
Convention, 10,161,000 homes, 10:30 
to 11:00 p.m., Friday July 25, during 
the early part of the third balloting. 

Note that the Republican and Demo- 
cratic peaks on TV were during identi- 
cal time segments in the evening. On 
radio the peak time segments for the 
two conventions were adjacent in the 
afternoon. 

These peak figures were attained by 
all sponsors combined. Compare these 
figures with leading radio and TV pro- 
grams between and before the conven- 
tions. Here are some of the leaders, 
according to Nielsen: 
• During the spring of 1952. the 
leading network radio shows reached 
between 4,000,000 and 5,000.000 
homes. 



KBTV 



Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 

In New Bngland — Bvrtha Bannan 



Suggestion: File 
this article for "56* 

sponsor's article summarizing 
results and audience accru- 
ing from 1952 convention 
sponsorship may come in 
handy to admen in 1956. // 
could be used as background 
for a decision on whether 
or not to buy into or around 
convention broadcasts. 



/ Transmitting Denver's 
Most Powerful v Signal from" 
Atop Lookout Mountain 



c - s PKBTVl 

ABC CHANNEL 1 

Affiliate 9 I 

• L DENVER J l 

To reach the rich, expanding 
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KBTV . . . for sales resultsl Check these 
facts and figures. Write for complete 
details on this productive, fast-grow- 
ing market. 

THE GREAT 
COLORADO MARKET 

Population 1,325,089 

% Increase over 1940 18.0 

Total Retail Sales SI, 257.095. 000 

Total Urban Population 831.318 

Total Rural Population 493,771 

TV Sets in Area 99,899 

(Rocky Mtn. Elec. League— Dec. 1) 



KBTV 

CHANNEL DENVER 

1100 CALIFORNIA • TAbor 6386 

Contact Your Nearest 
Free & Peters Representative 



Radio Station 



KFMB 



IS 

now 



CBS 



RADIO NETWORK 



San Diego, Calif. 
(550 on Dial) 



John A. Kennedy. Board Chairman 

Howard L. Chcrnoff, Cen. Manager 

Represented by THE BRANHAM CO. 



66 



SPONSOR 



Here in the 

San Francisco Bay Area 

(ONE OF "FIRST 10" MARKETS IN TV SETS) 




■ 1 ' '■•-' 




is a major advertising 
medium . . . and the 
major TV station in the 
market is 

KRONtv 

which operates 

on Channel 4 and puts 

more eyes on SPOTS 



Mosf Advertisers! Rorabaugh reports that 
KRON-TV serves the largest number of ad- 
vertisers in this 3-station market 

Biggest Audience! Pulse shows that 
KRON-TV offers the greatest percentage of 
audience, day and night, and all week 

Best Shows! Pulse counts more top-rated 
shows on KRON-TV than on the other two 
San Francisco stations combined 

Clearest Coverage! The market's highest 
antenna sends KRON-TV's signal throughout 
the Bay Area market, deep into Northern and 
Central California 



ASK FREE & PETERS for availabilities . . . 
in New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, 
Fort Worth, Hollywood. KRON-TV offices 
and studios in the San Francisco Chronicle 
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An NBC Affiliate, KRON-TV is owned and 
operated by the San Francisco Chronicle. It 
has pioneered in San Francisco TV (Channel 
4) since November 15, 1949. 




12 JANUARY 1953 



67 



• The Groucho Marx radio program 
reached 2,440,000 homes between the 
conventions. 

• In June 1952, / Love Lucy reached 
9, 2 74,000 TV homes during one week. 

• During the spring of 1952, Lucy 
reached a peak of 11,000.000 homes. 

Without going into detailed com- 
parisons, it is obvious that the top 
radio and TV shows can equal or 
exceed the half-hour audience reached 
by one sponsor during the convention. 
But it is also obvious that no broad- 
cast sponsors, within such a short 
period of time as the two conventions, 



ever reached so many people so many 
times. 

The convention sponsors had plenty 
of time to put their ideas across. Ad- 
miral had 105 hours of TV coverage, 
100 hours of radio coverage. Philco 
had 138 hours of TV time, 91 hours 
of radio time. As for commercials 
Westinghouse presented 202 on TV, 
taking up 267 minutes of commercial 
time, and 186 on radio, taking up the 
same amount of time in minutes. Ad- 
miral had 310 minutes of commercial 
lime on TV and 215 minutes of com- 
mercial time on radio. 




WSAZ-TV 

Covers the rich 
(and growing) 

OHIO VALLEY 

EXCLUSIVELY! 



WSAZ-TV, with HOMETOWN PROGRAMING 
Huntington-Charleston) is viewed in this area of 
3,000,000 EXCLUSIVELY— Plant expansion at 
South Point, Ohio $12,000,000 and Government 
Building Program outside of Portsmouth, Ohio in the 
Millions . . . WSAZ-TV covers 103 counties in West 
Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia . . . 



1 



MARKET DATA: 1951-52 (Total Area)* 

POPULATION: 3,299,300 

FAMILIES: 812,000 

FOOD SALES: $479,404,000 

DRUG SALES: $ 48,506,000 

RETAIL SALES: $1,828,557,000 

EFFECTIVE 

BUYING INCOME: $2,873,118,000 

Source: Sales Management — "Survey of Buying Power" — May 10, 1952 

84,000 WATTS— CHANNEL 3 
Affiliated with all four Television Networks 



WSAZ-TV 



HUNTINGTON, W. VIRGINIA 
represented by the KATZ AGENCY 



Nielsen Election Night listening fig- 
ures are not complete but for TV 
analysis showed that 17.166,000 homes 
viewed the returns at one time or an- 
other. This was 89.9% of U.S. TV 
homes. The high point in viewing was 
during the half hour beginning at 9:00 
p.m. when 13.977,000 homes were 
tuned in. The figures went downward 
after that. 

However, up to the half hour be- 
ginning at 10:30 the number of view- 
ing homes remained above 13 million. 
After midnight more than nine million 
homes were still tuned in; and at 2:00 
a.m. the count was nearly five million 
homes. 

Illicit was learned? Looking back 
on the convention, the sponsors feel 
that the selling job was properly han- 
dled and effective. They don't consider 
the commercials intruded and they 
point out that, although a broadcast 
sponsor is allowed 10 r < of program 
time for commercials, none of them 
used more than half of their allotted 
time quota. (See "Advertisers learned 
plenty at the conventions," SPONSOR 
28 July 1952.) 

There was no difference in the basic 
commercial approach between the two 
conventions. There was a real effort 
made to get more variety, however, 
into the Democratic Convention broad- 
casts. Philco, which put 11% of its 
TV commercials on film, made up 42 
different commercial films for the con- 
ventions. Because all stations weren't 
interconnected, it was necessary to 
make 777 prints, the largest single TV 
print order up to that time. 

With its 24 products advertised dur- 
ing the convention, Westinghouse used 
28 different live commercials with 
Betty Furness plus 26 different flip 
card commercials. Admiral sought 
variety by indoctrinating the an- 
nouncers in Admiral sales lore and 
letting them speak extemporaneously. 
It worked well during the G.O.P. con- 



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68 



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NEW YORK CHICAGO 


DETROIT ATLANTA DALLAS KANSAS CITY LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 




HEARING 

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BELIEVING 



Central Ohioans buy brand 
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clave and Admiral continued the tech- 
nique during the Democratic one. 

Neither the sponsors nor networks 
can see now how they could have cov- 
ered only the highlights of the conven- 
tion rather than the entire picture. 

Adman Ritenbaugh. speaking for 
\^ estinghouse. said, '"It is our feeling 
that the impact of the complete cover- 
age was beyond description. The 
thousands of letters received during 
and after the conventions bear this 
out. The people were thrilled by even 
the smallest incident. How could you 
broadcast just the highlights when 
some of the by-play, such as the 
Romany 1 roll call 1 incident during the 
G.O.P. Convention, the fire episode 
during the Democratic Convention, 
and hundreds of others, were as great 
a part of the over-all picture as any of 
the major speeches."" 

Ritenbaugh also declared that par- 
ticipating sponsorship would have 
been a mistake: "The audience for the 
convention broadcasts and telecasts 
fluctuated greatly during each day. 
The millions of people who followed 
the convention proceedings certainly 
did not make up a static audience. This 
changing audience would seem to stop 
any argument for a shared sponsor- 
ship. There would undoubtedly be 
confusion in the minds of people as to 
the sponsor of a program such as this 
if they would have seen or heard many 
different kinds of commercials." 

As for the networks, here is what 
they learned from the conventions: 

1- T\ equipment has to be made 
smaller and more portable. Radio still 
has the edge in the setting up of re- 
motes. However, in one instance, an 
NBC television crew set up equipment 
in the Blackstone Hotel ready for tele- 
casting 37 minutes after a call was put 
in to the crew in a garage four miles 
away. 

2. The 1956 conventions will see 
more emphasis on the manpower side 
and less on the technical side. There 
will probably be more interpretation, 
more coverage of events taking place 
outside the convention. 

3. V tual production costs for su< h 
events as conventions have probably 
reached a ceiling. 

4. The top problem in 1956 will be 
to present a tighter, clearer, and more 
deftlv dovetailed presentation. This 
could entail a completely revolution- 
ized technique of convention proceed- 
ings in the planning ol the two major 
political parties. 



• • • 



70 



SPONSOR 



nobody needs a slide rule to prove 
that most advertising costs have 
gone up in the past ten years. But 
sometimes people overlook the fact 
that advertising values have also 
zoomed upward! 



And more than ever, 

RADIO serves you the biggest slice 

of ADVERTISING VALUE 



Radio now delivers the biggest audiences in history. 

Yet the cost of using radio has increased far less than 
any other costs in the advertising business! Here's an 
illustration — 




It now takes $206 
to buy engravings 
that cost $100 
in 1942 




BUT it takes only $114 to 
buy time that cost $100 in 1942 
..onKYW.the50.000-watt 
Westinghouse station that 
dominates the rewarding 
Philadelphia market area 



In six of the nation's leading markets. Westinghouse 
stations provide unbeatable advertising coverage., at 
a cost-per-listener that makes every dollar count., 
for more! 

WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc 
WBZ • WBZA • KYW • KDKA • WOWO • KEX • WBZ-TV 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, except for WBZ-TV: for WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sale* 




12 JANUARY 1953 



71 



500 TV STATIONS 

I Continued from page 25 I 

ihem in pi icing "new" TV markets: 
As each new TV station joins a net- 
work, the average cost for a Class " \ 
hour will be somewhere between si "ill 
and $200 gross, depending on the size 
of the market. This price is set, at the 
moment, by the simple economics of 
station operation and the fact that the 
outlook is for fast set growth in the 
newest TV areas. 

With a half-hour TV time slot likely 
to cost over $46,000 per week on a 



"full" network of the near future, it's 
only natural that manv agencymen 
have gasped in alarm, as they mea- 
sured these figures mentally against 
their client's pocketbooks. 

At the same time, the TV networks 
are aware of the limitations of adver- 
tising budgets. "We wouldn't dare in- 
sist that network TV advertisers carry 
every station on the network, a CBS 
TV official told SPONSOR. "We'll prob- 
ably set a 'basic' network of perhaps 
70 or 75 stations, covering the same 
number of top markets, and arrange 
the others in groups of supplemen- 




WHADDA YA MEAN, RABBITS? 



These, my friend, are CHINCHILLAS . . . the in-the- 
money bunny . . . the aristocrat of the rabbit world. We 
dug up this photo because it's a perfect illustration of 
the WIBW audience. 

You see, we're a farm station. Always have been. As 
a result, WIBW is the station that Kansas farm families 
have always listened to most*. And when it comes to 
spendable income, WIBW listeners are the aristocrats in 
this area. Twelve consecutive years of wonderful crops 
and high prices have taken care of that. 

CASH IN on this known buying power and known 
listening preference. USE WIBW! 

'Kansas Radio Audience 1940-52 




taries. Down at the end of the list 
there may well be 'bonus' stations who 
will be happy enough to carry big net- 
work shows without charge in order 
to attract audiences." 

Indeed, most admen feel, the only 
way the major networks will be able 
to operate is through a very flexible 
selling plan. There is likely to be more 
use of regional TV webs, partial net- 
works and a goodly number of shared- 
sponsorship or alternate-week arrange- 
ments. 

There are, however, some distinct 
agency hopes for market-by-market 
rate reductions in TV — despite the 
booming growth of networks. Many 
of the largest TV areas — such as Buf- 
falo, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, St. 
Louis, etc. — are one-station cities. On 
the FCC's time-table, these markets 
will have more TV stations moving in 
shortly. Then, admen feel, the "old" 
stations will start offering fancy dis- 
counts as the competition starts to get 
much tougher. Some of the savings 
here, both in terms of what networks 
will ask for the "old" station's time 
and what the station will have on its 
spot rate card, will help greatly in buy- 



BMI 



Pin Up Sheet 

YOUR EVERYDAY GUIDE 
TO CURRENT SONG HITS 

The broadcaster faces a 
daily challenge of providing 
the best in recorded musical 
entertainment. 

To help meet this challenge 
BMI issues its monthly "Pin 
Up" sheet of BMI-licensed 
songs which can honestly be 
classed as Hit Tunes. 

Most broadcasting stations 
keep the BMI "Pin Up" sheet 
prominently posted as a con- 
venient reference. Complete 
record information is pro- 
vided, as well as a handy cal- 
endar listing dates and events 
important to broadcasters. 

// you'd like your own 
personal copy — write to 
BMI Promotion Dept. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



72 



SPONSOR 




Here's the REAL pitch 

on radio , in Kentucky! 

When you strip it of all the fancy talk, the Kentucky radio story 
boils down to this: 

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Metropolitan Louisville and its satellite markets — 
a concentrated area covered daily by WAVE, alone! 

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Free & Peters, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



12 JANUARY 1953 



73 



Independent 

Retail Grocers 

in Baltimore say: 

WFBR's 

the station for us ! 



Every year since 1936, the 
powerful Independent Retail 
Grocers Association of Balti- 
more has turned to Baltimore's 
promotion-minded, know- 
how station, WFBR, to make 
sure their Annual Food Show, 
held at the Fifth Regiment 
Armory in Baltimore, goes 
over with a bang. 

Every year WFBR has thrown 
the full weight of its promotion, 
programming, merchandising 
and production departments 
behind this great food event. 

The result? Every year, bigger 
crowds, more exhibitors, better 
displays — and firmer loyalties, 
friendship and cooperation be- 
tween the 2765 members of the 
Independent Retail Grocers 
Association and WFBR. 

For real showmanship, solid 
merchandising and active, 
day-in, day-out promotion, ask 
your John Blair man or write, 
wire or phone . . . 



ing "new" television markets. 

Such savings, of course, won't alter 
the upward trend of over-all costs. As 
a result, many a top advertiser today 
is asking his agency, quietly, if the 
game is going to be worth the price of 
admission. 

On a mathematical basis, the answer 
seems to be a cautious "yes." Sidney 
W. Dean Jr.. v.p. and director of mar- 
keting services of McCann-Erickson, 
recently stated to the ANA: 

"By dividing the number of poten- 
tial television homes by the cost of 
commercial time, cost-per- 1,000 net 
television homes now stands at 56<£ in 
the original 63 television markets. By 
December 1954. the projection indi- 
cates a decline to approximately 50^. 



"Advertisers shouldn't endorse the prin- 
ciple of 'robbing Peter to pay Paul,' 
financing television at the expense of 
other media." 

J. L. VAN VOLKENBURC 

President 

CBS TV 



an 11 9f reduction in the cost-per- 
1.000 net homes, by the NBC defini- 
tion. If they could be computed on a 
gross basis, they would be substantially 
lower. 

"By applying the projected rates for 
the 62 new television markets to the 
gross potential audience of the 18,000.- 
000 homes," Dean added, "the pro- 
jected cost-per-1,000 gross television 
homes becomes 44^ by December 
1954. While this is a valid measure- 
ment of the potential cost for non- 
simultaneous spot time in these 62 
markets, it cannot be compared with 
the above cost of the 1,000 net homes 
in the original 63 markets." 

(NOTE: In the statement above, 
Dean refers to "net" homes as opposed 
to "gross." The "net" TV audience is 
the total potential viewing homes at a 
given moment of time, since there are 
some duplications and overlaps in the 



63 "old" TV markets. "Gross" audi- 
ence is the technical sum of all the 
audiences of all stations in these 
areas.) 

An interesting qualifier to such pro- 
jections was made to sponsor by one 
NBC TV executive. By his calculations, 
the simple "circulation" cost figures 
(net costs vs. potential audience) for 
the NBC video web is $1.67-per-l,000 
for a half-hour evening slot starting 
January 1953. By early 1955, this 
figure will have dropped, the NBC man 
believes, to about $1.50. 

Key points for admen: As TV net- 
works grow, despite possible savings 
here and there in one-station markets 
that have become more competitive, 
the time costs will rise. New stations 
may come on at an average cost of 
$150-1200 for a Class "A" evening 
hour, gross. Ultimate size of each of 
the major national TV webs may be 
about 125-150 outlets, starting at a 
"basic" list of perhaps 70 and working 
down through groups of supplemen- 
taries. And, although TV networks 
will cost more, they will reach so many 
more people that the costs-vs. -circula- 
tion figures will drop. 

Effevts on other ad media: Since 
large-scale TV is going to be an ex- 
pensive item, admen are naturally curi- 
ous about the long-range effects of TV 
on other media, particularly radio. 

Most agencies feel today that radio 
will continue as a useful, active adver- 
tising medium when TV reaches near- 
national size in a couple of years. 
However, radio — particularly night- 
time network radio — may find its pri- 
mary use by the larger TV advertisers 
of 1955 in a "complementary" role. 
That is, radio will be used to fill in 
the gaps of TV at night. During the 
daytime and early morning radio will 
hold a good deal of its audience and 
its revenue, the admen interviewed by 
sponsor predicted. 

Independent radio stations, particu- 




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74 



SPONSOR 



NORTH CAROLINA IS THE SOUTH'S NUMBER ONE STATE 



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ale smart is 




U JANUARY 1953 



75 



larly those who have developed loyal 
fallowings in the face of TV competi- 
tion—like New York's WNEW and 
WQXR, are likely to fare well. Big 
powerhouse stations and the clear- 
channel radio outlets — who have sub- 
stantial audiences among TV and non- 
TV families in video areas, and in the 
non-TV families outside the TV cur- 
tain — are also good bets for the future. 
( Interestingly, Y&R recently com- 
pared costs-per-1,000 in a major TV 
market to determine this. A spot radio 
campaign on a major 50 kw. station 



was matched with a spot campaign on 
a series of smaller, outside-the-TV-area 
stations. The big station won in a 
walk. Cost-per-1.000 homes on the 
large station was about $1.50; on the 
series of small stations surrounding it. 
the costs averaged $5.10). 

Of the two other "indoor" media — 
newspapers and magazines — news- 
papers are likely to be affected much 
less than magazines by the growing 
size of TV. Research studies — such as 
those prepared by Y&R and the Hof- 
stra Study of NBC TV — have shown 



SELL MORE IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 State! 



"J- u K me l \Crtr " 



* Winston-Salem 

is the home of 

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_s> 



w& 



Recent official Hooper Ratings 
show WSJS, the Journal-Sentinel 
Station, FIRST in the morning — 
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Represented by: HEADLEY-REED CO. 



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a\\ f 00DS 

WNSTON-SM-W'S 



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1952 Survey °*^^^^ 



that newspaper readership is dented by 
TV in a video home, but it isn't much 
below the level of a non-TV home. 
Magazines, on the other hand, are 
much harder hit. 

Key points for admen: TV has al- 
ready had a deep effect on other ad 
media. In the next few years, its effect 
will be even more pronounced. Admen 
predict today that nighttime radio may 
drop to a "complementary" media role, 
and he used to fill in the chinks of TV 
coverage. Daytime and early-morning 
radio may he more durable. Indepen- 
dent radio outlets, and poiverhouse ra- 
dio stations will have the best chances 
in an era when the U.S. map is dotted 
with 500 or more TV stations. Maga- 
zines will be hit harder than news- 
papers by the growth of TV, admen 
feel. There are ceilings to what any 
large manufacturer can lay out for ad- 
vertising budgets. Therefore, TV is 
likely to fall heir to a good deal of 
money which might have been ear- 
marked for radio or print media — 
but only where TV proves itself a 
better buy. * * * 




CLEVELAND'S 

66*4 

STATION 




5,000 WATTS— 850 K.C. 

BASIC ABC NETWORK 

REPRESENTED 

BY 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES 



76 



SPONSOR 



GIRDLES ON TV 

(Continued from page 30) 

how the girdle would fit her. Although 
this film was acceptable to the network, 
it never actually went on the air. 

NBC TV's policy on intimate wear- 
ing apparel is representative of the 
television industry: Demonstration <>t 
such articles is permissible only when 
it is not shown on a live model. 

Recalling the early days of TV, 
Stockton Hellfrick said, "We have 
found that our audience objected to 
seeing women's thighs exposed on the 
TV screens. Today we observe a ban 
on the traditional can can costume as 
well as on commercials that might of- 
fend audiences in any part of the coun- 
trv. Audience reaction coupled with 
good taste has guided our policy." 

Grace Johnsen, director of ABC's 
continuity-acceptance department, af- 
firmed Stockton Hellfrick's ideas on 
the subject of what can safely be shown 
on video and what might arouse ad- 
verse comment. She recalls a 60-sec- 
ond film commercial by the Flexie ac- 
count a couple of years ago. This film 
used the "Topper" film series tech- 
nique of having the model's body fade 
out and showing only the girdle and 
jewelry. However, even at that, views 
of the girdle on the form of the invisi- 
ble model were from stills, not action 
shots. No one objected to this han- 
dling of the subject. 

Another acceptable way of advertis- 
ing girdles or brassieres on ABC TV is 
in the femcee's or model's hands, while 
she points out its advantageous fea- 
tures. This policy towards intimate 
wearing apparel was established on the 
network from the start. 

In 1950, however, ABC's Grace 
Johnsen decided that following the 
rules blindly was a mistake. "We de- 




cided to judge each case according t" 
its own merits," she told SPONSOR. In 
line with this outlook, ABC accepted 
the Maidenform Brassieres account two 
years ago, and produced one of the 
earliest live T\ commercials showing 
a live model in a bra. I See "How time- 
have changed!" 4 December 1950 
SPONSOR.) Of course, the copy ap- 
proach, setting, ami action were dig- 
nified and subdued. The model didn't 
walk in her deshabille, though an in- 
troductory shot did show her in the 
highly publicized dream sequence 
Maidenform uses in its black-and-white 
advertising. This commercial was 
shown on the Faith Baldwin Theatre 



*'The Advertising Research Foundation 
today is truly a tripartite organization. 
Now, advertisers, agencies, and media 
all are subscribers and they are all 
equally represented on the Board, and 
I think that is what makes the Founda- 
tion strong today." 

EDGAR KOBAK 

President 

Advertising Research Foundation 



of Romance over the ABC TV network 
from January 1951 through July 1951, 
Saturdays 12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
with both good results and favorable 
reactions. 

CBS TV has a firm policy against 
use of live models wearing girdles or 
bras. The only girdle account which 
the network ever accepted was the Play- 
tex girdles which were advertised about 
a year ago on an early afternoon wom- 
en's program, Fashion Magic. The 
show opened with a still of the famous 
Playtex photograph that is used in 
their black-and-white media advertis- 
ing — the one showing a girl in a Play- 
tex garment as she leaps and dances. 



Superimposed over thi> >till was the 
title of the program. During the ac- 
tual commercial, the garment was nev- 
er shown on a live model. Yet e\en 
under these circumstances, the film 
might not have been accepted 1>\ the 
network had it been planned for a later 
hour when the audience composition 
might be less exclusively female. 

Edwin Saulpaugh, head of DuMont's 
continuity-acceptance department, re- 
calls only one girdle account that was 
ever carried on the network. The gar- 
ment was shown on a women's pro- 
gram by Kathi Morris, who took it out 
of a package, held it up, and comment- 
ed on it. It was, however, never shown 
on a live model. DuMont feels thai 
showing the garment on a dummj form 
would be acceptable, but the network 
goes along with majority opinion on 
the subject: Live models are out. 

Sarong's new 20-second commercial 
film seems to have overcome the ban 
to the satisfaction of continuity ac- 
ceptance of the nets with whom the\ 
checked. However, individual stations 
are still free to make their own de- 
cisions. 

This problem of dealing with "deli- 
cate" subjects on television has faced 
manufacturers of such items as laxa- 
tives, women's intimate apparel, liquor, 
toilet paper, in fact any number of so- 
called "unmentionables" since TV be- 
gan I see 3 November 1952 sponsor, 
page 22 1 . However, this hurdle, far 
from suppressing creativeness. has 
stimulated film producers and cop\ - 
writers to greater ingenuity and origi- 
nality. By intelligent awareness of the 
rules of good taste, many an advertiser 
has found clever, interesting, often ar- 
tistic ways of presenting his product on 
television without embarrassing the 
viewers and yet at the same time with- 
out losing any of his sales points. * * * 



This is WHDH's John Day! 

Outstanding News Editor, Analyst, Announcer 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



77 



what makes 



WLAC 





78 



Mr. Cohen Williams, President of Martha White Mills, 
Inc., says, "WLAC alone clicked my self rising corn 
meal into first place. When I was shown a survey plac- 
ing Martha White Self Rising Corn Meal in top place, I 
was amazed! When this can he done by using only 
WLAC, 15 minutes a day, and Boh Jennings, I would 
say that WLAC is a sales clicking station." 

When WLAC Clicks ... Its Audience Clicks, TOO! 

Whether we are selling corn meal, work clothes, frozen 
foods ... or any other merchandise . . . WLAC Programs 
with Personalities hold and SELL radio listeners. . . 

The Nashville SALES Power Station 

CBS RADIO 50,000 WATTS 

Nashville, Tennessee 

For further information contact The Katz Agency, Inc., 
National Advertising Representatives 

SPONSOR 



MEN, MONEY 

(Continued from page 6) 

$2,163,419 in taxes, the net profit 
(ending 30 September) was $2,069,- 
307, equal to $1.50 a common share as 
against $705,610 profit the year be- 
fore, and 37$ a share dividend, 
w * -:;• 

Short memories being what they are 
in life (and in business) it is worth 
recalling that possibly the greatest all- 
time creator of sales "franchises" has 
been radio. Think of half a dozen 
soaps, Pepsodent, Lady Esther, Dr. 
Lyon's, Raleigh Cigarettes, Carnation 
Milk, Wrigley Cum, Jell-O, Fitch 
Shampoo, 20 Mule Team Borax, 
Household Finance. Phillips Milk of 
Magnesia, Luden's Cough Drops, John- 
son Wax, such paints as Acme, Cook, 
Moore, International Silver. Alka-Selt- 
zer, Chase & Sanborn coffee, Real Silk. 
Jergens. What is their debt to radio? 
At at guess, incalculable. 

■X- * « 

The "franchise" pays off in quick 
capital gains, or in year after year 
market strength. As an example of 
capital gains think back to the two 
Harris Brothers, merchandising wiz- 
ards, bringing Toni coldwave up from 
nowhere to a sellout for $20,000,000 
to the Gillette Safety Razor people. Bui 
the trademark franchise when properly 
engineered has a durability beyond 
gold mines, which can peter out, and 
personal genius, which can go stale. 
Not by happenstance is Procter & 
Gamble, a franchise of franchises, able 
to set aside large sums for market re- 
search and — most significant of all — 
experiments in new entertainment 
techniques. They know well the payoff 
built into a well-planned new product, 
or new programs to help forced 
draught old franchises. * * * 



RADIO RESEARCH: 1953 

[Continued from page 2i!i 

likewise the area of out-of-home listen- 
ing. 

With the pressure from TV mount- 
ing, radio's cry that it is being short- 
changed by some of the rating services 
ha; assumed a more strident note. 
Adding fuel to the demand that such 
services do something about revising 
their audience-counting systems is the 
increasing tendency among some ad- 
vertisers to let ratings alone govern 
the decision on whether or not to can- 
cel or renew a contract. 

Radio stations cite such actions by 
advertisers as justifying the charge 
that their future is at the mercy of 
antiquated rating systems and the con- 



*'Just because an advertising dollar 

during a recession cannot bring in the 

same amount of sales it does during 

prosperity — it is not a bad dollar. It 

may be the livest advertising dollar ever 

spent in terms of checking recession." 

JOHN P. CUNNINGHAM 

Chairman of the Board 

Cunningham & Walsh, Inc. 

• ••••••• 

fusion accruing from the varying 
methods of all the rating services. A 
step toward correcting this condition 
is the four-committee project of the 
Advertising Research Foundation. With 
Dr. E. L. Deckinger of Biow as gen- 
eral chairman, these committees are 
trying, in summary, to find out what 
would be the ideal rating method. 
(Members of the committees have al- 
ready dropped hints that they're not 
getiing the warm cooperation they had 
anticipated from the rating services.) 
In the opinions of complaining ra- 
dio stations, this ARF project is all 



right but it isn't exactly what tiny 
want. The) l©ok upon it as a long- 
range scheme: what they would much 
prefer is quick action on the part of 
the leading rating services. The latter 
have indicated that they are giving 
serious thought to more detailed meth- 
ods (il home sampling but say tin 
aren't ready to talk about when. 

Comments gathered by SPONSOR in 
the course of its survey are pretty well 
convinced that the traditional ways of 
measuring radio are in need of over- 
hauling. The disposition is anything 
but one of trying to cover up past 
"sins"; rather there is an awareness of 
the necessity for measuring the radio 
picture in all its dimensions. 

The sponsor survey, as it will be 
noted from the rundown of what each 
firm is doing, found that it was a little 
too early to get the complete research 
picture for 1953. Some organizations 
explained that they had several proj- 
ects either wrapped up or in the draw- 
ing-board stage but policy dictated 
they refrain from making statements 
until these plans had been approved 
by the proper authorities and the nec- 
essary budget put through. 

Station reps loom more important 
in the radio research picture with each 
passing year. Associated with consis- 
tent activity in the field of radio re- 
search are such rep organizations as 
CBS Radio Spot Sales, John Blair & 
Co., the Katz Agency, and the Henry 
1. Christal Co., which just recently in- 
duced seven major radio stations it 
represents to have Alfred Politz do a 
jointly sponsored study for them on 
how many and what kind of people 
radio influences. 

Here is a company-by-company sum- 
mary (in alphabetical order) of what 
the SPONSOR survey found was sched- 
uled in the way of radio research 




This is WHDH's Curt Gowdy! 

The Voice of the Boston Red Sox — Top Sports Personality 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 



See Your John Blair Man 

79 



among networks, research organiza- 
tions, and trade groups: 

ABC: Is considering a number of 
radio studies but the plans haven't 
been crystallized enough to discuss 
them. 

American Research Bureau: 

Has developed some new methods of 
measuring radio which have been test- 
ed in the field. One of them involves 
the problem of measuring multiple-set 
listening. Director James Seiler says 



his technique for measuring listening 
on a person-by-person basis rather 
than on the basis of a family unit will 
go a long way toward filling up this 
particular research gap. ARB is also 
expanding its technique to match up 
the products on the pantry shelf with 
the family's radio listening history. 

Advertising Research Founda- 
tion: Its four-subcommittee study of 
rating methods will get fully under 
way this month. The No. 1 task is the 
auditing of the various services, with 




Our rates are local and include 
complete merchandising distri- 
bution and promotion assistance. 

We serve 400,000 loyal listen- 
ers in Negro, rural, industrial, 
and four nationality groups. 

Only the Gary Sales Plan sells 
Indiana's second marker. 

Call us without obligation. 

Gen. Mgr.-WWCA 



Gary Indiana's 
No. 2 Market 



ARF men going out into the field with 
rating service operatives to observe 
procedures. Also entailed in the study 
is, as Biow's Dr. Deckinger phrases 
it, "putting the measuring stick to the 
reasons for the different methods used 
by the rating services" and eventually 
determining where each service falls 
short of the "ideal" rating techniques 
that one of the subcommittees is dele- 
gated to recommend. How will all this 
help radio? According to Dr. Deck- 
inger, it will eliminate some of the 
confusion that stems from trying to 
analyze radio by means of rating ser- 
vices, and the advertiser will then be 
in a better position to evaluate the true 
dimensions of radio. 

Rroadcast Advertising Bureau: 

This organization has many research 
projects planned. Here are a few of 
them : ( 1 I extension of its car-radio 
studies in which it will do sampling of 
cars on the road in eight markets of 
from two million population down to 
150,000 and measure the number of 
cars on the road at various periods of 
the day, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; 
( 2 I expansion of its studies of multi- 
ple-jet listening with emphasis on the 




LOCAL 
RATES 

With KWJJ, National Advertisers can 
take advantage of Local Rates. Your 
nationally advertised product, when 
local retail outlets are used as the 
advertiser, is entitled to local rates. 
KWJJ's sales staff will be glad to help 
you >n lining up cooperative advertis- 
ing with retailers on this money-saving 
plan. 

OREGON'S 

"Wod PonerfJ" 

Independent Station 

1011 S.W. 6th Ave. 
PORTLAND, OREGON 

National Representatives: Weed & Co. 



80 



SPONSOR 



kitchen radio; (3 1 extension of its 
cumulative Nielsen audience studies 
through which it measures how many 
radio listeners are reached with a regu- 
lar program series in the course of a 
day, week, month, or three-month 
period, including TV areas; 14) a 
special project to study intensel) the 
pattern of radio listening at night in 
TV homes and at the same time check 
on the proportionate attention shared 
with TV, magazines, and newspapers; 
(5) continuance of BAB-financed AR- 
BI studies to measure sales effective- 
ness and dollar volume produced by 
radio as against newspapers at the 
point-of-sale. So far the studies have 
been confined to department stores and 
food chains (among them the Kroger 
Co.) but early 1953 plans call for add- 
ing drug chains to the list. Master- 
minding these projects is Kevin B. 
Sweeney, v. p. in charge of promotion 
and research. 

CBS Radio: Has a number of proj- 
ects in the planning stage which it 
would prefer to keep under wraps. In 
any event, it expects a busy research 
year, especially when analyzing the 
whole network picture in light of the 
coverage data now being funneled to 
the network by the Standard Audit & 
Measurement Service. 

C. E. Hooper: Apparently the only 
developments that might come under 
the heading of "new" is the broaden- 
ing of Hooper's Mediameter studies. 
Hooper here uses his coincidental tele- 
phone technique to determine the min- 
utes of use daily of the four media — 
radio, TV, newspaper, and magazines. 

MBS: Most of its projects for 1953 
are still in the planning stage. How- 
ever, the network will do a lot more 



expanding of the data it collected for 
its study, "Non TV America," which 
it released in the fall of 1952. It will 
probably supplement this study with 
one along the lines of "TV America," 
which would focus on multiple-set and 
out-of-home listening. 

\'BC: Has a number of what it con- 
siders important projects lined up for 
the next few months, but the one big 
direction its efforts will take is the 
selling of advertisers on the idea of 
supplementing their TV hookups with 



"Give the farmer :i good product, good 
service, and fair treatment and you'll 
have a customer who will stay with you 
in good times and had, and even from 
generation to generation. The farmer 
is a good buyer when he has money or 
sees the prospect ahead for making 
money. The farmer is the most loyal 
customer that has ever heen seen. He is 
an individualist. He is a risk-taker. He 
is a husinessman." 

THEODORE B. HALE, V.P. 
International Harvester Co. 

*••••••• 

a radio network. With the aid of the 
radio circulation data it has bought 
from Nielsen, the NBC research de- 
partment expects to build a document- 
ed story showing that there are enough 
unduplicated homes to make a radio 
network almost a "must" for a nation- 
al advertiser already u-ing a TV net- 
work. The basic premise of this argu- 
ment is that a TV home should not be 
considered a dead loss to radio circu- 
lation at night, since at some times 
during the course of a number of eve- 
nings people in that TV home are 
bound to listen to radio. Like other 
organizations. NBC will ?o in heavily 
for studies that deal with out-of-home 
and multiple-set listening;. It will also 
extend its s'ud'es on mea-uring radio's 



>ulrs effectiveness along the lines of 
the "Radio Hofstra" it revealed to the 
trade last September. 

A. C. Nielsen: Is carefully examin- 
ing its existing sample of radio homes 
in the light of data on multiple-set 
homes it gathered in the course of its 
1952 coverage study. There is a prob- 
ability that it will change this Audi- 
meter sample to meet the incidence of 
multi-sets. During 1952 Nielsen ma) 
also launch a Nielsen Coverage Study 
No. 2. This will largely depend on the 
demand there is for it. 

Pulse: Will expand all of its out-of- 
home surveys and do some work on 
secondary-set usage, introducing the 
former into more and more ol the 
markets it services as the year pro- 
ceeds. Dr. Sydney Roslow added that 
he had a couple of new services on the 
drawing board which should be ready 
for unveiling to subscriber prospects 
in a few months. 

Stantlanl ltfrftl & Measure- 
ment Service: Dr. Kenneth Baker, 
who heads this operation, said that the 
coverage job he has just wrapped up 
left this impression with him: Cover- 
age measurements should be done 
more frequently and at much less ex- 
pense. It seemed ridiculous to Baker 
that over SI million should have to be 
spent each year on this sort of under- 
taking by a single medium. As for 
plans, Baker's most important one is to 
get copies of his radio circulation data 
to all the advertising agencies as quick- 
ly as possible. 

First delivery of SAM coverage data 
has already been made to some 100 ad 
agencies in cities like New York, Chi- 
cago, and Los Angeles. * • * 




This is WHDH's Bob Clayton! 

Famous for his Nationally Known "Boston Ballroom" 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald -Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



12 JANUARY 1953 



81 



one of WDIA's 
many famous 
personalities 




Procter and Gamble's 
CHEER 

Joins WDIA, Memphis! 

Thus CHEER. P&G's newest pro-Juct— with the 
built-in "Blue Magic" — becomes the fourth P&G 
product on WDIA (joining Tide. Crisco and Duz). 
Why? Because WDIA completely dominates in sell- 
ing to the great Negro segment of the Memphis 
Trade Area (439,266 Negroes in WDIA BMB coun- 
ties). Do other blue-chip advertisers know this? 
You bet. There's a big list which includes Blue 
Plate Foods. Musterole. "High Power" Chile & 
Tamales. Carnation Milk. Riceland Rice. McCormick 
Tea & Spices. Pertussin and Armour Cioverblooni 99! 
Believe us. it'll pay YOU to get the full WDIA 

story TO DAY1 

HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
City: Memphis. Tend. Months: Oct. -Nov. '52 

Time Sets WDIA B C D E F G 



T.R.T.P. 11.9 23.4 27.2 20.3 13.0 II. I 8.7 4.0 
(Note: WDIA's share Saturdays: 21.4; Sundays: 35.3} 



MEMPHIS 



WDIA 



TENN. 



John E. Pearson Co. Representative 
Dora-Clayton Agency. Southeast 



What has TV 
Done to 
RADIO 

iei Syracuse? 

In spite of the fact that Syracuse 
is a two-TV-station city - - even 
though 71% of the homes in the 
Syracuse area have TV sets — two 
separate surveys* show that radio 
is very much alive and kicking. 

3.07 Hours a Day 

is the average daily radio-listening 
time in TV homes in Syracuse. 
These same homes watch TV an 
average of 4.52 hours a day. Non- 
TV homes listen to radio 4.4 hours 
a flay. TV has not replaced radio 
in Syracuse — merely supplements 
it as a source of entertainment and 
information. 

II rite, Mire, jtlione or Ask 
Headley.Reed for your FREE 
Copy of r/if Surveys. 




Acuse 

570 KC 



NBC AFFILIATE 



SUNDIAL 

[Continued from page 27) 

The salesman's transcription further 
pointed out that use of the jingle dur- 
ing a six-week test had boosted sales 
as much as 52%. 

As an illustration of the deal offered 
to retailers lets look at two markets. 
Boston and Providence. The one-min- 
ute rate on Boston's WHDH was $24. 
but Sundial offered local dealers a 10- 
spot package for $60 or a 20-spol 
package for $100, with Sundial laying 
out the balance of the cost. In this 
case, Sundial paid $2,304 for 96 an- 
nouncements, recovered $480 from 
participating dealers. 

On the other hand, the WHIM. 
Providence, rate being $4.85 per min- 
ute-spot permitted the shoe manufac- 
turer to recover $250 of a $485 ex- 
penditure by getting the local Sundial 
outlets to participate in the 100 an- 
nouncements used in that market. 

By the time the fall campaign was 
ready to go on, 146 dealers were tied 
in. Schedules were bought on 79 sta- 
tions for a total of 8,500 announce- 
ments — almost 210 hours of com- 
mercials — to be used during the back- 
to-school period. 

Dealer reaction to the campaign was 
so enthusiastic that the agency went 
to work almost immediately on a five- 
week Easter 1953 saturation schedule. 
Because of the success of the Foodini 
traffic builder, the dealers asked that 
a giveaway be tied into the radio cam- 
paign. After shopping around, the 
agency settled on a "magic" ring which 
will be distributed to participating 
dealers at cost (about $12.50 per 100 l . 

It is interesting to note that the ra- 
dio spots are governed by TV avail- 
ability: Spots are all daytime in TV 
but day and night in non-TV areas. 

Sundial is experimenting with TV 
spots in Greensboro, N. C. and film 
commercials are available to dealers 
who want to use them on a co-op basis. 

In iiive \ cai - round continuity I" its 
advertising. Sundial place space in na- 
tional magazines like Life, SEP, Col- 
liers', Boys Life, Parents. To stretch 
this budget over the year, small space 
ads are used. 

Sundial attributes great importance 
to ils trade paper advertising. I sing 
double trucks in alternate issues 
throughout the year keeps the Sundial 
name smack in front of the retailers, 
reminds them that Sundial is backing 
them up. * * * 



THE QUAD-CITIES 

74th in RETAIL SALES 

among Sales Management's 
162 Metropolitan Areas 



s 



TEADILY increasing is 
the standing of the Ouad- 
Cities among the 162 stand- 
ing metropolitan areas. Now 
in 74th place for retail sales 
volume, the Quad-Cities con- 
tinues to grow. And growing 
with this community for over 
25 years. WHBI- is a power- 
ful influence in the homes of 
over 240,500 Quad-Citians — 
quality people who buy qual- 
ity goods — yours included, if 
you tell them. 

Les Johnson — V.P. and Cen. Mgr. 







WHBF 

TEIC0 BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 







,""* 







• Same old story 



• in Rochester . . . 

! WHEC WAY 
I OUT AHEAD! 

» Consistent audience rating 

• leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y./// 
$,000 WATTS \ 

ft •prxanfonV,.! ... 
IVri ITT-M<KINN r Y, Inc., N»w York, Chicago 
LEE P. O'CONNELL CO.,lo Angc-Us, San Fronciice 



82 



SPONSOR 



Illlllllllllll 



IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllHII"!" 111111 "' 

TERNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS' • • IHTE 



IIll«lllliillllllllllll«lllllllHlllIlllllIlllIlIll«llll"«""«"™ llll,,,,11,,,lll,,Inl,,,lll,, 



RNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS • 

wmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiM "" , 



• INTERN 



Radio business 

abroad expected 

to top 1952 



Steve Mann, Adam J. Young International's foreign radio expert, 
e xpects 1953 to surpass 1952 in foreign radio business for three 
reasons: (1) continued rise in newspaper rates; (2) continued im- 
provement of radio abroad as ad medium; (3) illiteracy of population 
and/or distribution problems of newspapers in many areas. 



-IRS- 



New sponsors, 

market outlook 

described 



1953 "looks very good" to Al Martinez, Melchor Guzman's v. p. He cites 
more volume by old sponsors, debut of new ones. Examples of latter: 
Champion Spark Plug in Puerto Rico, Panama, other Central, South Amer- 
ican countries; Corn Products Refining — Puerto Rico, Cuba, Panama; 
Davis & Lawrence (pain killer) — entire Caribbean area, Central Amer- 
ica, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela; Hormel (food products) — Puerto Rico, 
Panama. Martinez' description of some major Latin markets from cur- 
rency standpoint: Brazil — bad, expected to get better; Central America 
— no problem; Ecuador — a little better; Colombia and Venezuela — much 
better; Peru — fair; Mexico — good; Cuba — excellent; Argentina — dead. 



-IRS- 



Canada Dry 

sponsors priest 

on Mexican TV 



XEW-TV, Mexico City, is going to do a Bishop Sheen with Canada Dry 
sponsoring a padre from Monterrey. McCann-Erickson of Mexico City is 
agency. Mexican law prohibits discussion of religion, so he'll talk 
on moral issues. Paul Talbot, Fremantle Overseas Radio president, 
visited Mexico recently, gave SPONSOR this impression of TV there: 
"More activity than viewers." (Mexico City has 30,000 TV homes.) He 
sold entire 250-film Encyclopedia Britannica library to XEW-TV on trip. 



-IRS- 



Tangier radio 

installs 2 new 

transmitters 



Radio International, Tangier, has installed 2 new medium wave trans- 
mitters — 50,000 watts on 1232 KC ' s and a 10, 000-watter on 1079 KC ' s , 
according to H. R. Southworth, general manager, who's American. With 
shortwave 1, 000-watter being stepped up to 3,000 watts and a new 
shortwave 10,000-watt transmitter being built, station hopes to blan- 
ket North Africa, Central Europe, Spain with its French, Arabic, Eng- 
lish, and Spanish broadcasts. Pan American Broadcasting is U.S. rep. 

-IRS- 



Canadians buy 

4 radio sets 

to 1 TV; Bulova 

scores show 



12 JANUARY 1953 



Canadians bought 119,271 TV sets first 11 months 1952 for total of 
197,709, a s against 402,320 new radio sets for first 10 months, ac- 
cording to Radio-TV Mfrs. Assn. of Canada. WBEN-TV, Buffalo, stepped 
up its power to 50,000 watts early in December to reach some 100,000 
Canadian homes. Only Canadian competition is from CBLT, Toronto. 
After recent "In Town Tonight" gabfest on latter, President Robert E. 
Day of Bulova Watch Co., Ltd. telegraphed CBC Chairman A. Davidson 
Dunton: "Impossible for CBC to hold any audience with shows like 'In 
Town Tonight.' Our spot at 8:30 this evening like throwing $240 
down the drain. " 



83 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS_ 



Who are TV's pioneers? 

TV's pioneering era is dimming as 
the wonder-medium grows ever bigger. 

New TV stations, and new TV mar- 
kets are coming along so fast that no- 
body has time to think much about 
how this all came about — who the 
broadcasters are who saw television 
coming and had the nerve to do some- 
thing about it. And it took plenty 
of nerve. 

Before the 1953 crop of TV stations 
and problems engulfs us we're taking 
time out to note some <>f the men and 
firms who made TV possible bv pio- 
neering TV stations. The list isn't com- 
plete, far from it. But these are the 
ones we recall. If you know others, let 
us know who they are. 

George Burbach. KSD-TV. put his 
future on the block with the Pulitzers 
when he talked them into financing (he 
In I postwar TV station, on the air 
in February 1947. Wilbur Havens, 
WTVR, not onl) buili the first TV sta- 
tion in the South, but as earl) as 1944 
published a full-page newspaper ad 
urging NBC to get behind TV. lint 
lor (.'lair McCollough, head ol the 
Steinman .Stations, some ol the origi- 
nal L03 TV station pioneers would 
still be among the missing, lie argued 
and cajoled a number ol radio broad- 
■ i-lcrs into filing their applications be- 
Fore the freeze. Don Lee had an ex- 



perimental station for years before the 
war. and although it didn't get the 
first TV station in the Los Angeles 
market it became the landlord for the 
transmitter sites of the stations that 
did. Arthur Church. KMBC, doesn't 
yet have his TV grant, but his TV 
school in Kansas City trained hundreds 
of TV technicians for two decades. 
CBS was strong on TV, but spent its 
early efforls on color experimentation 
and exploitation. George Storer was 
another who not only went into TV 
fast and ferventb after the war. but 
induced others to join the pioneers. In 
Salt Lake City. Sid Fox. KDYL-TV, 
shifted from an experimental setup to 
an early postwar commercial operation. 
Like George Burbach. Bill Fay risked 
his long-time job with Stromberg-Carl- 
son when the firm wasn't doing well 
financially and came through with 
\\ 1 1 \ M-'l \ . < leneral Klectric pioneered 
back in 1942. came on fast in the 
postwar period with WRGB. Aldo De- 
Dominicis started low-operating-cost 
WNHC-TV, New Haven, on a shoe- 
string early in 1948 and is one of the 
real Horatio Alger stories of TV. Al- 
ways pioneers, WWJ-TV and Walter 
Damm's WTMJ-TV got going among 
the very first in 1947. Allen B. Du- 
Mont went at TV from several angles: 
his New York-Washington-Pittsburgh 
stations were among the first in each 
market. NBC encouraged its stalions 
and was on early in New York with 
WNBT. Balaban and Katz were first 
in Chicago with WBKB; Stanley Hub- 
bard in the Twin Cities with KSTP- 
TV; Irving Rosenhaus in Newark with 
WATV; Jim Hanrahan in Cleveland 
with Scripps-Howard's WEWS, Jim 
-house and Bob Dunville with WLWT 
in Cincinnati; A. H. Kinhofer in Buf- 
falo with WBEN-TV; Nate Lord in 
I ouisville wi'h WAVE-TV: Leonard 
Reinsert, John Outler, and Bob Moodj 
in Atlanta and Dayton with Cox Sta- 
tions - WSB-TV and WHIO-TV; Edgar 
Stern Jr. and Bob Swezev in New Or- 
leans with WDSU-TV; Mitchell Wolf- 



son in Miami with WTVJ; Hank Sla- 
vick in Memphis with WMCT; 
Charles Crutchfield in Charlotte with 
WBTV; Gaines Kelley in Greensboro 
with WFMY-TV; Helen Marie Alvarez 
in Tulsa with KOTV: P. A. (Buddy) 
Sugg in Oklahoma City with W r KY-TV. 
These are some of the pioneers, and 
there are more. 

In Philadelphia Philco's WPTZ was 
on the air experimentally in 1941, and 
WFIL-TV, headed by Roger Clipp. was 
doing business with 10 or so other 
stations in September 1947. Paul Rai- 
bourn and Klaus Landsberg had Para- 
mount's KTLA going early in 1947. 
There was an ABC vice president in 
Washington. D. C. who sold Ed Noble 
on setting his sights on five TV outlets. 
Herb Mayer of Empire Coil was a 
non-broadcaster who audaciously start- 
ed WXEL in Cleveland and later 
KPTV in Portland. Sarkes Tarzian 
had enough faith to put little WTTV 
into Bloomington, Ind. Meredith Pub- 
lishing went into Syracuse in 1948 
with WHEN, managed by Paul Adanti, 
and later bought stations in Omaha 
and Phoenix. F. Van Konynenburg was 
early in Minneapolis with WTCN-TV 
(since changed to WCCO-TV). Jack 
Harris in Houston sold the Hobbys on 
buying an existing station; and so did 
Martin Campbell in Dallas with the 
Dealeys. Harold Hough got WBAP- 
TV going with the approval of Anion 
Carter. There are the John Fetzers, 
Mort Walters, Walter Evans, Harry 
Bitners, Hub Tafts, Phil Laskys, Ed 
Lambs, Cam Arnoux who were among 
the early birds. 

All told. b\ June. 1948 there were 
30 stations on the air: WBAL-TV, 
WMAR-TV. WBZ-IA . \\ IN \C- 1 \ , 
WBEN-TV, WBKB, WCN-TV. WLW- 
TV. WEWS. WWJ-TV, KTSL, KTLA. 
WTMJ-TV. KSTP-TV, WNHC-TV, 
WABIX WCBS-TV, WNBT, WPIX, 
WCAH-TV. WFIL-TV, WPTZ. WTVR, 
WRGB, KDYL-TV, KSD-TV, WMAL- 
IV. WYPAY. WTTG. 



84 



SPONSOR 




Team and It's 



I^AoMe^£cC cutcC Wite/ 



For years, there's been a strange courtship going on in the Heart of 
America. It has been the wooing and winning of the Kansas City Primary 
Trade Area by The KMBC-KFRM Team. The Team was the successful suitor 
— in fact the only logical suitor from the very first. KMBC-KFRM made it a 
point to understand and coddle "Miss Kansas City Market" from the moment 
they met. KMBC-KFRM helped the Market grow — saw her through good 
times and bad — served her with the greatest in radio — was her best friend 
and through this intimacy became "Market-wise". 

There is no record of when the wedding of The KMBC-KFRM Team and 
the Kansas City Primary Trade Area actually took place. But it's been a 
tremendously successful union. The heart of the Team and The Heart of 
America beat as one and advertisers will tell you that the best proof of this 
union are the thousands and thousands of "sales"— large and small — begat 
by this powerful voice of The KMBC-KFRM Team and the plump purse of 
the Kansas City Primary Trade Area. 

V This is the fourth of a se-'es on The KMBC-KFRM know-how 
** which spells dominance in the Heart of America. 

Call KMBC-KFRM or your nearest Free & Peters Colonel for the 
Kansas City Market Story. BE WISE-REALIZE. ..to sell the Whole 
Heart of America Wholeheartedly it's . . . 



^KMBC-KFRM""" 

CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 





and company 





use magazine for Radio and IV advertisers 



26 JANUARY 1953 



I 0-4 y 12220 
1 ISS FRANCES SPRAGUE 
NATIONAL EROADCASTING 
ROCKEFELLER PLAZA 
• 2 n Y 



50c per copy • $8 per year 




you say when, and they're ALL YOURS! 




Better say NOW! Your sales, like balloons, 
will go up when you take to the air 
over WNHC-TV. Television means 
WNHC-TV to families not only in all of 
Connecticut, but in eastern New York, 
Massachusetts, western Rhode Island and 
much of Long Island. 91 publications 
carry WNHC-TV listings. 



n H1C 




neW h3Ven New England's first 
complete broadcasting service 

Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 



^H 



COMING: BETTER 
RADIO RATINGS? 

page 25 

Astute combination of TV 
and psychiatry touched off 
Mogen David sales boom 

page 28 



Radio made Tulsa flower 
store nation's largest 






page 31 






6 WAYS TO KILL 
A TV COMMERCIAI 

page 32 

These tips from Ken Baker 
will help you get most 
out of SAM coverage data 

page 34 






Radio is Shell Chemical's 
speed medium when 
insects strike the farm 

page 36 






Foreign-language radio: 
a 1953 status report 



page 38 







mam ■ 



* 



PHILIP MORRIS... 




y*5% 



*«*-*SSei>- 



v« 



^ORP 



'°° v «A»s 






S« 






I 



-co; 



«•*». 



«« * 



'*** 







DOES A COMPLETE JOB. 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS... 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 




lHAVCNS & MARTININC. 




thesourh's first television station 

FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



"Something wonderful happens when you change 
to Philip Morris." This slogan prophesies the 
pleasant completion of a cycle that includes the 
buying of fine tobaccos . . . storing . . . curing 
. . . the manufacturing and selling of cigarettes. 
Just as millions of smokers today 
"Call for Philip Morris . . ." 

Millions of loyal listeners and viewers tune to 
Havens & Martin, Inc. Stations— WMBG, WTVR, and 
WCOD, serving the rich Virginia markets around 
Richmond. And "something wonderful happens" to 
advertisers on these First Stations of Virginia! 
They profit from the buying action stimulated by 
the power of Richmond's one and only complete 
broadcast institution. It should happen to you! 



WMBG am WCOD «« WTVR' 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 






Lucky Strike Sharp impact of TV's high cost on even biggest of advertisers couldn't 
would share be brought home more dramatically than this: Lucky Strike (American 
"Hit Parade" Tobacco Co.) is interested in finding an alternate-week sponsor for 
sponsorship its "Hit Parade." Because of traditional factor — creation of the pro- 
gram by ATC's late George Washington Hill — admen are comparing this 
development to that of venerable family selling its heirloom silver- 
ware. Telecast of 17-year-old show n ow costs 5 38,000 gross weekly for 
talent a nd prod u ction and $24,000 gross for time. 

-SR- 

Complications One of handicaps faced by Lucky Strike in its efforts to get alter- 
in possible nate-week sponsor for "Hit Parade" is this: NBC is mulling idea of 
"Hit Parade" reducing "Your Show of Shows" to one hour next season. Were that to 
co-sharing happen, "Hit Parade" could not immediately follow "Show of Shows" as 
it now does since first half-hour of "Show of Shows" is sponsored by 
Camel cigarettes. Hence there wouly have to be half-hour interval be- 
tween 2 shows, and agencies that have been approached about "Parade" 
say they are reluctant recommending "a client buy into a void." 

-SR- 

White Rock White Rock account is set to move into Ellington & Co. from Kenyon & 

switching Eckhardt. Cal J. McCarthy Jr. will do delivering of the business 
to Ellington and serve as account executive. He's son of Cal J. McCarthy, until 
recently executive v. p. of Ruthrauff & Ryan as well as treasurer. 
White Rock, subsidiary of National Distillers, last year spent around 
$850,000 on its ad campaign. 

-SR- 

Cause celebre which grew out of dismissal of George Kaufman from "This 
Is Show Business" actually had its origin in a momentary lapse of 
memory. As planned before broadcast, Kaufman was supposed to have 
remarked: "Let this be a program in which nobody sings 'I Saw Mama 
Kissing Santa Claus'." When the time came to deliver this crack 
Kau fman forgot title of current song hit and instead inserted title, 
"Silent Night. " 

-SR- 

Falstaff Beer may wind up with all major league teams but Pittsbu rgh 
in its sponsorship of "Game of the Day" on MBS this season. New York 
Giants have tentatively agreed to join list of teams picked up and 
sponsor has hopes of getting New York Yankees allied with project, 
likewise for first time. Unlike restrictions imposed on collegiate 
football by NCAA, baseball undertaking is clear of any monopolistic 
cloud: Any network may carry games if it meets MBS-Falstaff price. 

-SR- 

Negro WMRY-TV, New Orleans, may become first Negro-staffed TV st at ion. It 

stations has applied for Channel 26. Ownership would be same as that of WMRY. 

getting Another Negro market specialist, WJLD, Birmingham, has been assigned 

TV grants TV channel and plans to be on air by mid-summer. 



Kaufman 

row grew 

out of bad 

memory 



Near full 

house 

likely for 

"Came of Day" 



SPONSOR, Volume 7. No. 2. 2>; Januarj 1953. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications, Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive, Editorial. Advertising. Circu- 
lation Offices r.10 Madias Ave Nsw York 22 $8 a year in D. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act 3 Mar 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 26 January 1953 



TV looks 

for U.S. 

action 

vs. NCAA 



Time 

buying 

spreading 

out 



Stations 

accepting 

I.D. standards 

over 90% 



Hefty profit 

for 

CBS, Inc. 



Program 

sharing 

needed for 

diversification 



Agencies 

greet 

SAM data 

eagerly 



Nielsen's 

proposal 

for Audimeter 

revamping 



Comet Rice 

adding TV, 

radio spot 



TV industry appears to have become reconciled to but one way out of 
tight monopoly now existing in regard to televising collegiate foot- 
ball: Department of Justice filing anti-trust suit against NCAA and 
its membership. Such action is now pending in court against profes- 
sional football leagues. 

-SR- 

Increasing number of agency executives now involved in time buying is 
indicated by this comparison: When Station Representatives Association 
distributed its 1949 edition (the first) of its "Spot Radio Estimator" 
maximum number of copies it sent to any one agency was 10. Second 
edition of the "Estimator" has just been issued and maximum number 
sent to an agency this time was 50 cop i es. Y&R, where media buyers 
do all media buying for a specific account, is agency that got 50 copies. 

-SR- 

Over 90% of all TV stations now on air have accepted I.D. (station 
identification) standards set up by Station Representatives Associa- 
tion in cooperation with ad agencies. Of stations operating, 1 15 
abide by visual-and-copy pat t ern which 2 factions standardized not 
many months ago. (See "How to sell in 10 TV seconds," SPONSOR, 20 
October 1952. ) 

-SR- 

CBS, Inc., from indications, will show for 1952 profit increase of at 
leas t 10% over 1951. Profit for '51 was $6,380,000, which included 
$871,000 from tax adjustment. Company's audited financial statement 
won't be released until some time in April. 

-SR- 

Opinion not uncommon among admen is that number of top advertisers in 
1953 will show disposition to invite co-sponsorship of their expensive 
network TV shows principally for this reason: to get greater diversi- 
fication of programing and frequency on air. Considered as model 
example is American Tobacco Co.'s opening of its house-created and 
built "Hit Parade." 

-SR- 

Eagerness with which some agencies have taken to SAM's station home 
circulation and coverage data reflects confusion which has resulted 
from: (1) increase of radio homes by 8% since 1949 BMB ; (2) addition 
of 400 radio outlets, and (3) 200 adjustments in station power. Ex- 
planation on how to use SAM data starts page 34. 

-SR- 
Advertisers may discover radio ratings are higher and cost-per-1, 000 
radio homes lower if networks accept plan A. C. Nielsen has submitted 
to readjust Audimeter samples to cover multiple-set homes. Revamping 
of Nielsen rating system might raise cost of NRI subscription by as 
much as 50%. Details of findings on multiple-set homes accruing from 
Nielsen coverage study starts page 25. 

-SR- 
Comet Rice Mills of Houston, which has distribution in 25 states, is 
planning well-rounded radio and TV spot campaign for 1953. Tracy- 
Locke Co., Dallas, is agency. 

(Please turn to page 68) 



SPONSOR 



WNEW 

was the only 
New York radio 

station to 



increase its 



, 




audience in 1952! 



More and more 



your favorite station for music and news 



6 a. 



(Details upon request) 

SOURCE: PULSE 

to 8 p. m., Monday through Saturday 
1952 vs 1951, At Home Only 



WNEW 



1130 



ON YOUR DIAL 



50,000 watts day . . . 10,000 watts night 



Bill • 



the magazine Radio and TV 



advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



Coming: better Nielsen ratings? 

As by-product of NCS study in 100,000 homes, Nielsen now has probably most 
accurate study to date of number of multiple-set radio homes. As result firm 
can revise its Audimeter sample to give better multi-set measurement — if Indus 
try will pay for it. Also reported: Eight NCS radio-TV "basics" 

TV and psychiatry boom Mogen David 

Kosher wine broadened its market, becoming one of leading sellers, by astute 
combination of network TV and copy themes designed to stir basic emotions 

Radio made Tulsa flower store nation's largest 

Sales volume rose 650'r between 1940 when Christina's Flowers first went on air 
and 1952. Christina herself attributes store's success to KVOO garden show 
(she stars in it). Trade rates one of her two stores as largest in U. S. 

6 trays to fcilf a TV commercial 

You can read this picture story in five minutes and come away with reminders 
about the sin basic pitfalls in making a TV commercial plus an egual number of 
positive suggestions on sound selling. The source: Otis Carney, Chicago TV vet 

Hon- to get the most out of SAM 

New 1952 coverage data in the form of SAM reports has already hit the desks 
of many agencies and clients. To help admen make best use of it, SPONSOR 
went to SAM's research chief, Dr. Kenneth H. Baker, got his pinpointed tips 

Radio helps Shell Chemical get message to farmer 

Insecticide firm can have commercials on the air 48 hours after insect plague 
strikes because of spot radio's flexibility. That's big competitive advantage 

Foreign-language radio: 1953 

Growing number of national advertisers are turning to this means of reaching 
the foreign-born and second-generation market. Article gives details on why 
and advice on using foreign-language radio to best advantage 

SPONSOR index for second half of 1952 

Articles and departments are indexed here under convenient headings. Extra 
copies of this index are also available to subscribers without charge 



25 



2H 



31 



32 



34 



3U 



3H 



13 



COMING 



\\ hn Willys went on the air 

Never befo-e a big air advertiser, Willys-Overland has emerged this season as a 
major spender with sponsorship of two prestige vehicles (N. Y. Philharmonic on 
CBS Radio, "Omnibus" or. CBS TV). This article will explore Willys strategy 

9 February 
What you shouhl know about local cut-ins 

How much do they cost? What kind of advertisers can use them effectively? 
Do they have a future in television? These questions answered and many more 

9 February 
I tility employees double on TV to part' costs 

Regional sponsors who feel TV is too costly may get encourage.nent from the 
story of Boston Edison's all-employee program. By using its own executives, clerks 
as demonstrators it brings in a WBZ-TV household show at $1,000 a week 

9 February 



26 January 1953 
Volume 7 Numbd 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 6 

MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 10 

510 MADISON 12 

MR. SPONSOR, S. Mudd 14 

P. S. 16 

NEW AND RENEW 19 

TV RESULTS 48 

FILM TOP 20 52 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 56 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 58 

AGENCY PROFILE, C. Lage 64 

ROUND-UP 66 
NEWSMAKERS IN ADVERTISING 94 

INTERNATIONAL REPORT 97 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 98 

Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. J«f» 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, Evelyr 

Konrad 

Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President - Advertising: Norman Kniqhi 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coope 

(Western Manager), Maxine Cooper (Easter. 

Manager), Gust J. Theodore (Chicago Repre 

sentative). Wallace Engelhardt (Souther 

Representative), John A. Kovchok ( Produc 

tion Manaqer), Cynthia Soley, John McCc 

mack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Plef 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub 

scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta shearman 

Office Manager: Olive S\ erbon 



Pulillahed l>h let ;.u l» SPONSOK PUBLICATIONS IHC 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulation. end 
Vdverllalng Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York B. 
V 1 Telephone: MTJrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago 0111m 
U!l K. lit anil Ave.. Suite 110. Telephone: Superior 7-88M 
Wt.it Coast. Office: 8087 Sunset Boulevard, Lot Angela 
Telephone: Hillside 8089. Printing Office: 3110 Ills 
Ave. Baltimore II. Md. Subscriptions : I'nlted Stem 
Sfl a year. Canada and foreign S'.< Single copies 60t 
Printed In U. S. A. Address all correspondence to lit 
Madlsnn Avenue Nor Yn*k 22. NY MT'rrav H1H 8-J7TI 
Copyright 1953 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Corrals SALES With 
PERSONALITIES/ 







'/ 







3 



Here's a glimpse of results of actual sales 
roped in by WTCN-RADIO personalities. 

JIM BOYSEN — He made a one-minute an- 
nouncement for National Jewelers in Minne- 
apolis. Within two minutes, the jeweler was 
swamped with calls and couldn't handle the 
influx of store traffic. 

SEV WIDMAN— Muntz TV sold more sets 
from the Widman Show than the next three 
stations combined. 



JIMMY DELMONT— He made only two an- 
nouncements . . . sold eight 1951 Kaisers and 
six Henry J's. 

JACK THAYER — With one announcement 
for Hallicrafter-TV, Thayer received calls for 
309 TV demonstrations. 

These boys are real sales hands. They're 
proven and experienced. Talk to your Free & 
Peters representative. Ask him about these 
new personalities who have the ability to 
move your merchandise. 



National Representative* 
FREE AND PETERS 




KM POWER • R4 % 



TCN -Radio 

MINNEAPOLIS — ST. PAUl 

Town Crier of the Northwest 



26 JANUARY 1953 



Independent 

Retail Grocers 

in Baltimore say: 

WFBR's 

the station for us ! 



Every year since 1936, the 
powerful Independent Retail 
Grocers Association of Balti- 
more has turned to Baltimore's 
promotion -minded, know- 
how station, WFBR, to make 
sure their Annual Food Show, 
held at the Fifth Regiment 
Armory in Baltimore, goes 
over with a bang. 

Every year WFBR has thrown 
the full weight of its promotion, 
programming, merchandising 
and production departments 
behind this great food event. 

The result? Every year, bigger 
crowds, more exhibitors, better 
displays — and firmer loyalties, 
friendship and cooperation be- 
tween the 2765 members of the 
Independent Retail Grocers 
Association and WFBR. 

For real showmanship, solid 
merchandising and active, 
day-in, day-out promotion, ask 
your John Blair man or write, 
wire or phone . . . 








Jerri/ Bess, Frank B. Sawdon, Inc. v.p., says 
that if someone can prove that any retailer in the 
country uses more radio than Robert Hall Clothes 
it ivill be a shock to him. For this rapidly expanding 
clothing chain Jerry buys from 5.000-6.000 announce- 
ments a week (placed to run for 16 weeks). To 
make these buys in 70 markets, he travels three 
months out of the year, usually two weeks at a time. 



John Marsich, Kudner Agency, thought things 
would be back to "normal" when Genera! Motors' 
coverage of the NCAA football games ended in early 
December. Not a chance! GM promptly ordered >■ 
Christmas shoiv featuring Arthur Godfrey, ndco 
coverage of the Waldorf Astoria showing of its new 
car models, and an all-out treatment of the 
Eisenhower inauguration ceremony on 20 January. 



Jayne Shannon, J. Walter Thompson, deserves 
a deep bow from CBS TV. It was her Scott Paper 
Co. account which filled up the sponsors' roster lor 
Omnibus — Ford Foundation and Bob Saudek's answer 
to low-grade programing gripes. This is another 
move in Scott's stepped up air activity which was 
touched off by its booking of Scott Music Hall. Jayne 
also buys for Lever, Standard Brands, JohnsManrille. 



Hvrh Gruber, Cecil & Presbrey, finds himself 
with additional time buying activity as a result of the 
( & I' merger with J. D. T archer. Specifically, it 
means that in addition to the extensive buying he's 
been doing for Block Drug. McCormick spices, and 
\estle products, he'll now be concerned with the 
air activities of Benrus watches and White Hose tea. 
I. a test buy: Cecil Brown on Don Lee net for Block. 



SPONSOR 




OUTSHINES THEM ALL 
99.8% 



Domination of 16-County Area 
MORE Listeners ALL the Time* 



For over 25 years, time buyers have found that whatever their sales goal in Western 
New York, WHAM consistently outshines the competition. And for good reason! 
WHAM dominates 16 Western New York-Northern Pennsylvania Counties. The 
latest area PULSE proves again that WHAM alone with 99.8% listener preference 
can do your selling job to more people than any of the 24 radio stations in the area. 

Call the HOLLINGBERY Representative for Complete Details 



WHAM 



PULSE (Oct. -Nov '52) interviewed 6200 homes in 
WHAM-land. Out of 552 measured quarter-hour 
broadcast periods, WHAM was FIRST in 551. Truly 
overwhelming coverage and listener preference ! 



The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y: Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



26 JANUARY 1953 




Visitors at WFAA 30th Year Radio Fair requested 
more than 85,000 photos of their favorite stars 




at 30 



The news writer's "30" marks the finish of 
his story. To Radio Station WFAA, "30" sym- 
bolizes its Thirtieth Year of leadership . . . 
a year of great accomplishment, a vigorous 
advancement at a time when others cowered, 
fearful for the future of radio. With the 
successes of 1952 highlighted on these pages 
secure in its belt, WFAA strides forward 
with daring and dramatic sureness into 1953. 



Joe Reichman is always a great showman 



They're never too old 

or too young 

to enjoy the Shindig 




SPONSOR 



WFAA 30TH ANNIVERSARY RADIO FAIR 

The week of June 23rd more than 30,000 friends 
poured through WFAA's penthouse studios — from 
daylight to 10 P.M. — to enjoy continuous audience 
shows, shake hands with their favorite WFAA per- 
sonalities, view colorful, dramatic historical and mer- 
chandise exhibits, win prizes! 

MURRAY COX, R.F.D. 

Broadcaster, traveler, editor, promoter . . . leading 
exponent of Southwestern agriculture, now in his 
seventh year as Farm Director of WFAA. His 3rd 
annual WFAA Farm Tour last spring conducted 218 
enthusiastic farmers and ranchers through the Corn 
Belt, into Canada, and the New England states. Rec- 
ognized "one of the best friends of farmers of Texas," 
and for his tireless and conspicuous work in behalf 
of soil conservation and pasture improvement, Mur- 



for WFAA! 



ray's 6:30 morning and noon daily programs are 
closely followed by commercial farmers and ranchers 
throughout the WFAA area, to the great benefit of 
agriculture, his sponsors and WFAA. 

JOE REICHMAN 

Less than a year ago this big name bandleader- 
showman switched horses at the height of his career 
to join WFAA. Reichman's genius fuses a wealth of 
music, incidents, personalities and showmanship into 
delightful, informal shows that quickly gained him 
a strong following and six sponsors for 24 quarter- 
hours a week! 

REUBEN BRADFORD — 
"OPERA ONCE OVER LIGHTLY" 

Good natured spoofer, Reuben takes the "grand" out 
of grand opera, and introduces the beauty of its music 
to the man in the street. The general appeal of Reu- 
ben's witty, unique commentaries brought his pro- 
gram to the attention of NBC* — and a network 
contract. 

"Listen each Saturday 8:30 P.M. EST — your favorite NBC station. 

WFAA SATURDAY NIGHT SHINDIG SHOW 

The largest folk and country music stage show and 
broadcast was opened by WFAA at the State Fair of 
Texas, October 4-18, 1952. A fast paced four hours of 
hilarious entertainment — the Shindig's company of 
fifty artists, two bands, an emcee, two comics, a quar- 
tet, four top recording stars, and frequent top guest 
stars*, are drawing an increasing paid attendance. 

*Spike Jones Revue, Jan. 17 

NEW TALENT 

Forty radio and stage artists were added to the 
WFAA roster during the year, greatly broadening 
the station's public appeal and the variety of its pro- 
gramming at every taste level. 



These were our laurels of 1952. They are recounted in proof of WFAA's reluctance to 
stand still ... of its ability to ever step forward. Our plans are continual. Life began at 30 
for WFAA. By began we mean these were first steps in increasing our service — that in 
1953 WFAA shall be more exciting, more entertaining, more interesting to our audience 
. . . and more productive and profitable to our advertisers. 



Wore farm folks know Murray 
than the Gov'ner of Texas 




WFAA: dallas 

Radio Service of The Dallas Morning News 

Edward Petry & Co., Representatives 




820 

50,000 WATTS 
N B C • T Q N 

570 

5,0 WATTS 
A B C • T Q N 



26 JANUARY 1953 



WE'RE 
RELUCTANT 




BUT FACTS 
ARE FACTS 
AND 

KSDO 



# 



is 



1 



in 



San Diego 

*C. E. Hooper Report 
May through Sept. 7952 



# 



KSDO 

1130 KC 5000 WATTS 




Representatives 

Fred Stubbins — Los Angeles 
Boiling Company — San Francisco 
John E. Pearson, Co. — New York 



TTH 




■I iiii 



by 

Robert J. Landry 



S as in statistics and sex 

This column herewith faces in two directions at the same time and 
argues two points of view simultaneously. Neither feat is accom- 
plished for the first time. 

* * * 

Start with a cute word recently coined by Frank Cogan of the 
Gordon Baird advertising agency. He speaks of a given project being 
"statisticated" — meaning, there are data to support the sales pitch. 
This reminds us that all sales management, all advertising campaigns, 
all media, all entertainment and schedules need to be tidily "statis- 
ticated" and for this purpose an army of neat dolls and pipe-smoking 
masters of statistication are regularly employed. 



Now switch to the opposite extreme, to the community that cannot 
be measured, the element which eludes the test-tube, the mysterious, 
amorphous, magical something which the late queen of corn, Elinor 
Glyn, termed "it," which Marilyn Monroe had even when she was 
hungry, and which Jimmy Durante calls "poisonality" in himself. 



We are saying, not originally, that while we all properly honor, 
respect, and subsidize the "statisticated" story we are never wise to 
long forget l'amour toujours, charm, allure, big dig, or come-thither. 

* * * 

Pin-point down to the problem of radio in meeting the competi- 
tion of television. Here it is swiftly apparent that radio is a superbly 
"statisticated" medium of advertising. None better. Consult BMB, 
consult any network's formidable array of figures. Radio was, and 
radio largely still is, the greatest bargain medium ever devised. But, 
despite its stunningly statisticated status, radio at the moment is 
overshadowed by the new siren in town. TV has got "glamour," but 
large. True, the number of drop-out sponsors is increasing and the 
novelty is dissipating. Still, no denying that video has a new charge 
of sex appeal that has driven radio from many a fickle mind. 

» * * 

Another example of personality-alone besting a "statisticated" 
story, this time in TV itself. Just the other week there was a highly 
remarkable (if scarcely remarked) happening: General Foods can- 
celled a 40-rated commercial entertainment, Life With Luigi, in 
favor of a 12-rated sustaining comic, Red Buttons. The loser in this 
swap was well-statisticated; the winner was largely in a pre-statisticat- 
ed state of development. Nor was there any financial differential. 
Each show was a $20,000 (approx.) CBS package. 

* * * 

Can you imagine back a few years ago in the tightly statiscated 
situations of radio competition a program rating 40 getting the 
(Please turn to page 92) 



10 



SPONSOR 



The 

FIRST CITIZEN 

of the 
17th STATE* 






Charles John Stevenson is first on the air in WGY-Land. He greets his 
listeners between 6:00 a.m. and 6:45 a.m. every morning but Sunday. 
And he's first in sales, too! The president of the Company which was 
ne of his past sponsors wrote and said, "I regard you as the best salesman in 

world. Please send me a picture of yourself so I can hang it in my office." 
This is only one of the 30,000 pieces of mail "The Chanticleer" received last 
year. His jovial personality, his cheerful chuckle, and the music he provides 
between his conversation and his jokes have given him a tremendous following 
among the rural folk in Eastern Upstate New York and Western New England. 
As an individual Charles John really gets around! He's publisher of the oldest 
weekly newspaper in the United States (Washington County Post); he appears at 
plenty of fairs every summer; and every year he fills about 100 speaking engage- 
ments — everything from high school commencements to bankers' conventions. 

When he celebrated a recent program anniversary on the air, over a hundred 
people were in the studio at 5:45 a.m. Some of them had left their homes at 
3:30 a.m. to drive the hundred miles to Schenectady. 



PUT THIS FIRST CITIZEN'S PERSONALITY AND 
ENTHUSIASM BEHIND YOUR CLIENT'S PRODUCT 
AND IT WILL SOON BE FIRST IN SALES! 




CHARLES JOHN AND BLACKSTONE THE MAGICIAN A recorded interview 
with Blackstone was the feature of a recent Chanticleer Program. 



WGY AND THE FARMER 




Number of farms in the WGY area 


96,550 


Average value per farm 


$10,828 


Number of farms owner-occupied 


77,265 


Number of trucks 


54,643 


Number of tractors 


75,013 


Number of autos 


89,947 



50,000 WATTS 

WGY 

A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 

26 JANUARY 1953 



* The WGY area is so named because its effective 
buying income is exceeded by only 16 states. 



Studios in Schenectady, N. Y. 



THE CAPITAL OF THE 1 7TH STATE 

Represented Nationally by Henry I. Christal, New York — Chicago — San Francisco 



11 



I • 



2,779,531 



* 



Rich-From-The-Soil 

Midwesterners Live 

Within KMAs Vz MV Line 

At last count, 2,779,531 predomi- 
nantly-rural midwesterners lived 
within the KMA ' - Millivolt day- 
time contour area in Iowa, Nebraska, 
Missouri and Kansas. That's a mar- 
ket greater than Iowa, Washington 
State or Oklahoma — or, Colorado 
and Nebraska combined! 

They're America's top-spending 
farm market! In 1950 these KMA- 
Landers spent #2,819,660,000 for 
goods and services — a figure sur- 
passed only by a handful of metro- 
politan markets! 

Here is THE big farm market . . . 
served by the 5,000 powerful watts 
of KMA — The Midwest's TOP Farm 
Station. IF YOU sell products or 
services in the rural and small town 
midwest, then YOU BELONG ON 
KMA! Contact Avery-Knodel or 
KMA today. 
"1950 Census 




KMA 



SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



Omoho 's H-ber One 
Tension *«~ 
. Represented bV 
N ° W «. Co., »"«• 



Under Management of 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Shenandoah, Iowa 




fmadison 



GIRDLES ON TV 

Your January 12th article '^How to 
demonstrate a girdle on TV" is a swell 
story but it requires some clarification 
for both TV stations and retailers. 

The 4% of retailers' Sarong sales 
alloted for cooperative advertising cov- 
ers newspaper as well as TV advertis- 
ing. This is based on current sales not 
the previous year's. The company peri- 
odically checks retailers to make sure 
the 4% is not exceeded. 

Another point we would like clari- 
fied is your reference to Sarong's bud- 
get. The 1953 national advertising 
budget is confined to newspapers. TV 
expenditures are taken out of the co- 
operative advertising allotment which 
is separate from the national advertis- 
ing budget. 

Finally, the film runs 20 seconds 
which allows time for a retailer's tag 
line. 

Many thanks for publishing this Sa- 
rong story. Our prime purpose in writ- 
ing you is to prevent misunderstanding 
on the part of retailers and TV stations. 
Harold M. Mitchell 
Harold M. Mitchell Inc., Adv. 
New York 



WRICLEY 

Thanks very much for sending me 
the articles on Wrigley's TV-radio op- 
eration (sponsor, 17 November, 1 De- 
cember 1952). 

I think you did a very fine and 
thorough job on the subject, and I 
know everybody here who has read it 
feels the same way. 

Howard B. Ketting 

Vice President 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc. 

Chicago 



MARS CANDY 

Have just finished your Mars story 
(see " 'Radio-TV best sales tools we 
ever had' — Mars," sponsor 15 Decem- 
ber 1952) and say "Congratulations on 
a job well done." 

Elliott Plowe 
Advertising Mgr., 
Peter Paul, Inc. 
Naugatuck, Conn. 



MERCHANDISING SECTION 

May we congratulate you on your 
recent article dealing with "The mer- 
chandising problem" as explained in 
your December 1 issue. 

We found it of sufficient interest to 
order an additional unit of copies. We 
appreciate your interest in offering to 
supply us one or two copies without 
charge. It is such studies as this one, 
as well as others you have issued from 
time to time, that make your magazine 
of real value to the radio industry. 

Eugene M. Halliday 

Manager 

KSL 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



1 want to again tell you of the tre- 
mendous impression the coverage of 
merchandising made on me in your 
December 1st issue. I thought the piece 
was extremely well done and very help- 
ful to the industry. You should be 
commended. 

R. E. DUNVILLE 

President 

WLW 

Cincinnati 



GULP OR LUCK? 

I think I should resent the transla- 
tion of my name as given under Mr. 
Hans H. Tiixen's letter on page 9 of 
the 15 December issue of SPONSOR. I 
have never in all my years been ad- 
dressed as "Gulp." Is your transla- 
tion correct or is my knowledge of 
German poor? 

E. J. Gluck 

President & Gen. Mgr. 

WSOC 

Charlotte, N. C. 

• Writer Tiixen, commercial manager of Radio 
Saarbriicken, Saar, France, sent SPONSOR the 
Pepsi-Cola jingle in German with the comment 
that radio made it famous in that part of former 
Germany. The last line read: "Pepsi-Cola gluck, 
gluck, gluck." SPONSORS German expert trans- 
lated it to read: "Pepsi-Cola* gulp, gulp, gulp.** 
In answer to reader Gluck's letter our German ex- 
pert says she stands on her translation, that 
"gluck," an onomatopoeia, means, "gulp," while 
"Glfick" with an Umlaut would mean "luck.** 



USE MAGAZINE 

I just finished reading a copy of 
sponsor, and it looks like a magazine 
I should have had long ago. 
Please enter my subscription. 
J. W. England 
Manager 
KFDR 

Grand Coulee, Wash. 
I Please turn to page 93) 



12 



SPONSOR 



paying 

cable charges for 
your filmed 
TV program? 




If your TV program is on film, why pay cable charges when you can 
build custom-tailored coverage for your show on a Spot basis? The picture 
quality, of course, is constant — thanks to film. The savings in 
Spot time charges are enough to cover film prints, their distribution 
and other costs. But with Spot, you choose only the markets you want — 
and find that stations clear time more readily for Spot. 

Get the full details from your Katz representative. 



HE KATZ AGENCY/ INC • National Advertising Representatives 

488 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK • CHICAGO • IOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA • DALLAS • KANSAS CITY • DETROIT 



26 JANUARY 1953 



13 




YOU 
C H D S t 
CANADA'S 
FIRST 
STATION... 



Refail Sales up 36.9* 
I FCF local sales 



/ears |CFCF M*s ', u 

CFCF 

In Canada, A||~CaMaJ*. 




Iriiiiw 



SirflU'l; P. Wmlcl 

Exec. v.p. 
N. Y. 7-Ud Bottling Co., Inc. 



When asked about his early days with 7-Up, Sidney Mudd. now- 
executive v.p. of the N. Y. 7-Up Bottling Co., will tell you that he 
started as a "distributor'" in Chicago just after he took his B.A. in 
philosophy at St. Louis University. Press him a bit further and he'll 
admit that in those '38 days his duties as a distributor consisted 
of driving a truck, giving retailers a personal sales pitch, and 
hustling cases of the soft drink on his shoulder. 

Today, he's still in the business of selling 7-Up and still believes 
in the personalized approach. This is exemplified not only in his 
meticulous selection of service-salesmen but in the approach his 
company made in its first major TV effort last summer. 

Banding together with the other five bottlers who cover the terri- 
tory in and around New York City, alternate-day sponsorship of 
Happy Felton's Talk to the Stars over WOR-TV was undertaken. 
This program, which immediately followed each Brooklyn Dodger 
home game, featured an interview with the player selected as the star 
of the day by reporters in the press box. Alternately talking and 
sipping 7-Up, Happy gave a demonstration of the warm, friendly 
approach used by the whole 7-Up sales force. 

Sid explains the selection of the show this way: "Our salesmen 
had done the job of getting retailers to stock and display the product 
so it was up to us to create a mass demand for it. We wanted a TV 
program which had mass appeal with a quality touch. Well, the 
Dodgers play a classy brand of baseball and Happy Felton could 
never be accused of being anything less than big league." 

For their $1,500 a day the bottlers got almost instantaneous re- 
sults. Sid reports: "Those 18 telecasts stirred up more enthusiasm 
from our retailers than any other medium including national maga- 
zine and newspaper ads placed by the parent company. I'm con- 
vinced now that no medium gives your product the aura of class that 
TV does. And although its tough to pinpoint sales figures (particu- 
larly in view of the fact that July was hot and August cool), volume 
was up from 22-45' ", over the preceding year.'' 

Commercials on the program featured 7-Up as a thirst quencher, 
combined with ire cream for the youngsters, and as an "all-purpose" 
mixer which blends well with more potent ingredients. * * * 



1! 



SPONSOR 



iPiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^ iiiiiiii niiii ■IP 1 ; :iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiim 



WHOD 



Pittsburgh 's only 

"STATION OF NATIONS" 

Sells directly in 



10 Foreign Languages 



♦ITALIAN 

* POLISH 

* YIDDISH 

* SLOVAK 

* GREEK 



* HUNGARIAN 

* GERMAN 

* CROATIAN 

* LITHUANIAN 

* SERBIAN 



WHOD 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Represented Nationally By JOE WOOTTON/RADIO DIVISION 

INTERSTATE UNITED NEWSPAPERS, INC. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



26 JANUARY 1953 



15 




iVeit? developments on SPONSOR stories 



in prosperous, 
progressive 
Mobile . . , 


\ It ^ 




Met. Pop.— 

1940 1951 
114,906 231,105 

Assessed 

prop. val. — 

$61,038,683 $148,747,991 


% increa 
101% 

3H% 


e 



by using 



mm 



Oil, 

Adam Young, Jr. 

National Representative 

or 

F. E. BusHy 

Ccneral Manager 



ON THE DIAL 710 





"Cotton John," KGNC farm director (r.), has met most of 56,000 farmers in area 

See: 




fisstie: 



"How to get the most out of farm 
r;:dio and TV" 

29 December 1952, p. 27 



:bs 

Mobile, Alabama 



SllSjlCCt: Regional powerhouses KGNC and 
KONO eoneentrale on farm market 



One station in the Southwest which has recently gone out and 
done original research to find out how much influence it has with 
fanners is KGNC, Amarillo. (To get the facts, Market Research of 
Cleveland interviewed 1,000 people at Amarillo's 1952 Tri-State Fair. ) 
KGNC, a 10,000-watter and the only power station in the area, 
Hoes not have a single program designed purely for local consumption 
I according to Bob Watson, assistant manager and program director). 
Yet, of the 12 local stations within KGNC's primary coverage area, 
the survey showed that not one of them had preference over KGNC 
as a farm station, even in the home counties. 

Tom Kritser, KGNC general manager, explains that most every- 
one in the area knows J. Garland ("Cotton John" I Smith, the sta- 
tions farm director. "Cotton John" makes 10 to a dozen appearances 
every week at church circles, school centers, social and community 
gatherings throughout die station's big 78-county area. 

When the people surveyed were asked what types of farm programs 
they preferred, a large number mentioned names of specific programs 
heard only on KGNC in that area (though nobody queried knew who 
was sponsoring the survey). Out of the five most-preferred programs 
mentioned by both men and women, three of the five were programs 
conducted personally by Cotton John: Trading Post, a classified-ads- 
of-the-air show for listeners who want to buy, sell or swap things 
I no charge to anyone) ; Southwest Neighbors Farm and Ranch News, 
weather, crop, market reports; livestock market reports. 

Another "city" station in Texas which aims much of its pro- 
graming at farm and ranch folk is KONO, San Antonio; it special- 
izes in music and news for its rural listeners. It does not, however, 
neglect the vital element of "service" to listeners and sponsors. 

KONO's super-active farm and ranch director, Blake McCreless 
constantly gets around and "meets the folks," is himself a member 
of many local organizations, gives free air publicity to scores of 
regional events. His uhiquitousness is much appreciated by the 
station's sponsors. One KONO advertiser, Asgrow Texas Co. (seeds), 
wrote: "We have not met a single FFA (Future Farmer of America I 
member in this area who did not know Blake McCreless or who was 
not familiar with the program we sponsor." * * * 



16 



SPONSOR 






Throughout the 



length and 
breadth of 






for more than a quarter of a century . . . 
WTAG's sphere of influence has been firmly established 
in the local pattern of community life. 
Such loyal listenership has its rewards for worthy products. 




Fir^ 



i 




the picture is great in the 



and wtag-fm 
580kc basic cbs 




11 ORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 



/A New England 
State " 




R i: PRES l: N T B l> BY RAY M E R 



The Proof of the Pudding . . . 




... Is in the LEADING— or so the JELL-O-PUDDING and PIE FILLING box-top and 25-words-or-less contest 
indicates! 

Conceived by Young & Rubicam for General Foods and aired in a spot campaign over 120 stations, the 
contest featured a slant that loaded the ether with sizzling pitches. To the disc-jockey that captured the 
greatest number of entries according to market size and time cost went an expenses-paid vacation in Paris 
for himself and wife. JELL-O PUDDING and PIE FILLING even picked up the tab for baby sitter fees! 

T'aint fittin' to say, "We told you so," so we'll be conteni to hope KOWH's Hooper High Sandy Jackson and 
wife enjoy the trip. 

Of course Sandy won — more proof that you can't do better than first place! And that's where the Hooper 
averaged below for the 14-month period from October, 1951, to November, 1952, puts KOWH — thanks to 
personalities like amiable Sandy. 

C\it Magnifique! 



KOWH . . . 35.9% 



Largest total audience of any 
Omaha station, 8 A. M. to 
6 P. M. Monday through Sat- 
urday! (Hooper, Oct., 1951, 
thru Nov., 1952.) 

Largest share of audience, in 
any individual time period, of 
any independent station in all 
America! (Nov., 1952.) 



25. 



20 • 



Sta. "A' 




Sta. "B" 



OTHER 
STATION RATINGS 



Sta. "C" 



Sta. "D' 



Sta. M E' 



jMIf 



O M A 



General Manager, Todd Storz; Represented Nationally By The BOLLING CO. 



New and renew 



mm, 



26 JANUARY 1 953 




1. 



New on Television Networks 

SPONSOR hi M AGENCY 



Amana Refrigeration 
Bayuk Cigars 

Bristol-Myers Co 

Chesterfield Cigarettes 

( Liggett & Myers) 
Consolidated Cosmetics 

Electric Light & Power 

Cos 
Cemex Co 
General Electric Co, 

Lamp Div 
Johnson & Johnson 
Lever Bros 

Motor Products Corp 
Revlon Products 

Simoniz Co 
"Westinghouse Electric 



STATIONS 



Maury. Lee & Marshall NBC TV 58 

Ellington & Co ABC TV 15 

Doherty, Clifford, Steers CBS TV 50 

& Shenfield 

Cunningham & Walsh CBS TV 44 

Frank E. Duggan CBS TV 39 

N. W. Ayer & Son CBS TV 52 

BBDO CBS TV 30 

BBDO CBS TV 32 

Young & Rubicam NBC TV 61 

McCann-Erickson CBS TV 33 

Roche, Williams & Cleary CBS TV 58 

Wm. H. Weintraub CBS TV 32 

SSCB NBC TV 52 

Fuller & Smith & Ross CBS TV 40 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Kate Smith; Th 4:15-30 pm seg; 19 Feb; 13 wks 
Saturday Night Fights; Sat 9 pm to concl; 24 Jan; 

52 wks 
Jackie Cleason Show; Sat 8-9 pm ; partic; 3 Jan; 

27 telecasts 
Stork Club; alt Sat 7-7:30 pm; 10 Jan; 26 wks 

Arthur Codfrey Time; M-Th 10-10:15 am; alt 

days; 6 Jan; 52 wks 
You Are There; alt Sun 6-6:30 pm ; 1 Feb; 24 

telecasts 
Stork Club, alt Sat 7-7:30 pm; 3 Jan; 26 wks 
Jane Froman's USA Canteen; Th 7:45-8 pm; 8 

Jan; 52 wks 
All Star Revue; ev 3rd Sat 8-9 Dm: 10 Jan; 15 wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; M, W 10:30-45 am; 5 Jan; 

52 wks 
Carry Moore Show: Th 1:30-45 pm : 8 |an; 52 wks 
Jane Froman's USA Canteen; T 7:45-8 pm; 10 

Feb; 52 wks 
Big Story; alt F 9-9:30 pm : 6 Feb; 56 wks 
Freedom Rings: T. Th 2-2:30 om: 3 Mar: 39 wks 



2. 



Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



American Cigarette & 

Cigar 
Bristol Myers Co 



Ecko Products 

Ceneral Mills 
Hall Bros 
Int'l Shoe Co 

Jacques Kreisler Mfg Corp 

Lever Bros 

Mutual of Omaha 

National Dairy Prods Corp 
Norwich Pharmacal 

Procter & Gamble 

R. J. Reynolds Tob Co 

Sweets Co of America 

Tide Water Associated 

Oil Co 
Westinghouse Electric 



SSCB 

Coherty, Clifford. Steers 
& Shenfield 

Dancer- Fitzgerald -Sample 

Dancer -Fitzgerald -Sample 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
D'Arcy 

Hirshon-Carfield 

Young & Rubicam 

Bozell & Jacobs 

N. W. Ayer & Son 
Benton & Bowles 

Compton 
William Esty 
Moselle & Eisen 

Lennen & Newell 

McCann-Erickson 



STATIONS PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

NBC TV 46 I Big Story, alt F 9-9:30 pm; 6 Mar; 26 wks 

CBS TV 64 Break the Bank; Sun 9:30-10 pm; 11 Jan renewal: 

as of 8 Feb show reDlaced with Ken Murray 
Show alt with Alan Young; Show; 52 wks 
N8C TV 56 Welcome Travelers; alt M 2:30-45 pm (Central 

Timel ; 5 Jan; 26 wks 
CBS TV 47 Bride & Groom; M-F 12-12:15 pm; 2 Feb; 52 wks 

NBC TV 37 Hallmark Theatre; Sun 5-5:30 pm; 4 Jan; 52 wks 

Du Mont 21 Kids and Company; Sat 11:30-12 noon; 7 Feb; 13 

ABC TV 24 Tales of Tomorrow; alt F 9:30-10 pm; 23 |an; 

26 wks 

CBS TV 44 Arthur Codfrey Talent Scouts; M 8:30-9 pm; 5 

Jan; 52 wks 
NBC TV 20 On the Line with Bob Considine; T 10:45-11 pm; 

27 Jan; 52 wks 

CBS TV 47 The Big Top; Sat 12-1 pm; 24 Jan; 52 wks 

CBS TV 43 Sunday News Special; Sun 11-11:15 pm; 11 Jan; 

52 wks 
CBS TV 57 Guiding Light; M-F 12:45-1 pm; 29 Dec: 52 wks 

NBC TV 40 Camel News Caravan; M-F 7:45-8 pm; 52 wks 

ABC TV 40 Tootsie Hippodrome; Sun 12-12:30 pm; 1 Feb; no. 

52 wks 
Du Mont 7 Broadway to Hollywood; Th 8:30-9 pm; 22 Jan; 

13 wks 
CBS TV 59 Studio One; M 10-11 pm; 5 Jan; 52 wks 



3. 



Xew National Spot Television Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



Bosco Co 

Duffy-Mott Inc 

Garrett & Co 
Helena Rubinstein 
Seeman Bros 
Standard Brands 



Bosco milk ampli- 
fier 

Duffy-Mott apple 
products 

Virginia Dare Wine 

Toilet preparations 

Nylast 

Royal Pudding 



STATIONS-MARKET 



Robert W. Orr, NY 
(will transfer to 
Ruthrauff & Ryani 

Young & Rubicam, NY 



David J. Mahoney, NY 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson 

& Mather, NY 
Wm. H. Weintraub, NY 

Ted Bates. NY 



About 20 mkts 

20 major mkts 

20 mkts 

NY, Chi, and LA 

64 mkts 

19 mkts 



CAMPAIGN, start, deration 
end 



Partic; 13-wk campaign; 
about beg of March 

15-min "This is Charles Laugh- 
ton" recital series; st Jan 26 
wks 

l mm anncts, stn breaks; st 
early Feb; about 10 wks 

1-min anncts, day & night st 
5 Jan; to run rest of year 

1-min, 20-sec anncts; st 19 
Jan; 13 wks 

1-min partic & stn breaks; 
daytime; st Jan; 26 wks 




In next issue: /Vein and Renewed on Radio Networks, New National Spot Radio Business. 
National Broadcast Sales Executives, Sponsor Personnel, New Agency Appointments 



Numbers alter names 
refer to \ ew and Re- 
new category 

R. P. Bunnell I \ I 

W. A. Krause Jr (4) 

Franl; Fagan I 1 I 

Frank Brady (4) 

Harr\ Harding I I I 



26 JANUARY 1953 



19 




Ailvertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Byron Bonnheim 
Frank Brady 
Louis |. Carow |r 
Mrs. Russell C. Comer 
C. H. Cottington 
Virginia Curran 
Richard V. Downey 
Ransom P. Dunnell 
Robert M Ellis 
Jay Morse Ely 
Frank Fagan 
John M. Farrell 
Ceorge V. Genzmer )r 
A. V. B. Ceoghegan 
Drucilla Handy 
Harry Harding 
Henry Q. Hawes 
Robert E. Healy 
Max Hodge 
Ernest |. Hodges 
Charles L. Hotchkiss 
William H. Howard 
Richard F. Kieling 
Ted Knightlinger 
W. A. Krause |r 

Peter C. Levathes 
R. H. C. Mathews 
Dwayne Moore 
David Olen 
Paul C. Phillips 
Chester A Posey 

Bernard C. Rasmussen 

Cardner Reames 
Howard R. Smith 
Ashby Starr 
Walter A. Tibbals 
John H. Tinker Jr. 
Lou E. Townsend 
William C. White 

Nat Wolff 



Weiss & Celler, Chi, acct exec 

McCann-Erickson, NY, exec 

Bozell & Jacobs, Chi, acct exec 

Russell C. Comer Co, KC, partner 

Erwin, Wasey, NY, exec dir chg radio-TV 

BBCO, NY, timebuyer 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-McDougall, SF, vp 

Cunningham & Walsh, NY, mgr radio-TV prodn 

Auto mfr, sis prom dir 

Symonds, MacKenzie & Co, Chi, vp 

Young & Rubicam, NY, vp 

Wm. H. Harvey, LA, vp & acct exec 

Life Magazine, NY, natl dir retail reps 

Young & Rubicam, NY, vp chg media rels 

Howard C. Mayer, Chi, acct grp head 

Young & Rubicam, NY, vp 

McCann-Erickson, Pacific Coast mgr 

McCann-Erickson, NY, vp & treas 

Wilding Picture Prodns, Detroit, playwright-prodr 

Own pub rel firm, SF 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, NY, vp 

Young & Rubicam, NY, vp 

Free & Peters, NY, dir TV sis prom & res 

KTAC, Tacoma, gen mgr 

Pillsbury Flour Mills, Mpls, coord pkg & prod 

improvement 
Movietown, NY, head of TV, sis mgr 
Honan-Crane Corp, Lebanon, Ind. gen sis mgr 
Lennen & Newell, NY, media res exec 
Abbott Kimball, LA, acct exec 
N. W. Ayer, NY, hd TV prog & prodn 
McCann-Erickson, NY, chmn of advisory comm 

on plans 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, radio-TV timebuyer & 

bus mgr 
Russell C. Comer Co, KC. sr acct exec 
Condon Co, Tacoma, secy-tre'as 
Sues, Young & Brown, LA, adv sis prom mgr 
BBDO, NY, radio-TV dir 
McCann-Erickson, NY, creative dir 
Bank of Amer, SF, adv vp 
Joseph Katz. Baltimore, exec 

Young & Rubicam, NY, vd chg radio-TV pro:!n 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, vp 

Ward Wheelock Co, NY, dir plans & media 

Same, vp 

Comer & Reames, KC, pres (new agency) 

D. P. Brother, NY, head (new office) 

Hicks & Creist, NY, asst to dir radio-TV 

Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, SF, exec asst food accts 

Ward Wheelock Co, NY, mgr radio-TV prodn 

D. P. Brother, Detroit, memb creative & mgmt slf 

Casler, Hempstead & Hanford, Chi, acct exec 

Same, sr vp 

Byron H. Brown & Staff, LA. vp & acct exec 

Erwin, Wasey, LA, mdsg dir 

Same, co-chmn plans bd 

Bozell 6 Jacobs, Chi. acct exec 

Same, sr vp 

Same, sr vp 

Same, memb exec comm 

D. P. Brother, Detroit, playwright-prodr 

Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, SF, vp & acct exec 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-McDougall, SF, acct exec 

Same, sr vp 

Ted Bates, NY, radio-TV analyst 

Howard R. Smith Co, Tacoma, assoc I new agency) 

Bruce B. Brewer, Mpls, acct exec 

Young & Rubicam. NY, vp on special assignment! 

Burton Browne Adv, Chi, vp 

Benton & Bowles, NY, hd of media res 

David Olen Adv, LA, owner (new agency) 

Factor-Breyer, LA, radio-TV dir 

Same, sr vp 

Fuller 6 Smith & Ross, NY, radio-TV timebuyer 6 

bus mgr 
Comer & Reames, KC, exec vp (new agency) 
Howard R. Smith Co, Tacoma, owner (new agencyl 
AshDy btarr Co, LA, owner (new agency) 
Same, Hywd, superv radio-TV prodn 
Same, sr vp 

Charles R Stuart, SF, vp chg new business 
Cunningham & Walsh, NY, asst mgr radio & TV 

media 
Same, dir radio-TV dept 



5. 



Station Changes (reps, network afiiliation. power increases) 



KCRH. Hot Springs, Ark, new radio stn. beg oper 1 Jan '53 

KMTV, Omaha, new natl rep Edward Petry 

KPIX, SF, power incr to 100 kw 

KSWB, Yum.?, Ariz, new radio stn, beg oper 12 Jan '53, CBS 

Radio affil 
KTSM, El Paso, new radio stn, beg oper 4 Jan '53 
KXRN, Renton, Wash, call letters changed to KLAN 
WABI-TV, Bangor, Me, new natl rep Geo P. Hollingbery 
WFAI, Fayettevillc, N. C, new natl rep Wm. G. Rambeau 
WFDF, Flint, Mich, NBC Radio affil eff 15 Mar, formerly ABC 
WHBF. Rock Island, III, power incr from 23 to 100 kw; eff 

fall '53 



WHEN, Syracuse, NY, power incr from 53 to 190 kw 
WJBK-TV, Detroit, power incr to 100 kw 
WKOK, Sunbury. Pa. CBS Radio affil eff 1 Jan '53 
WMNC, Morgantown, N. C, NBC Radio affil eff 1 Jan '53 
WNHC-TV, New Haven, Conn, power incr ftom 18 to 316 kw; 

tr from channel 6 to 8 
WOR-TV, NY, power incr from 22 to 316 kw 
WOW-TV, Omaha, power incr from 17.2 to 100 kw 
WPIX, NY, power incr from 21.7 to 100 kw 
WTVN, Columbus, Ohio, power incr from 19.8 to 100 kw 
WTVU. Scranton, Pa, new TV stn beg oper 1 Mar; natl rep 

Donald Cooke 



Numbers after names 

refer to Mew and Re- 
new category 

W. A. Tibbals (4) 

/. H. Tinker Jr (4) 

Chester A. Pose) I 1 I 

// illiam Howard I 1 1 

Robert E. Healy I 1 1 

Rii hard Kieling (4) 

Nut Wolf] (4) 
R. II. (,. Mathews (4) 

//. G. Rasmussen I 1 1 

/ irginia Curran I 1 1 



20 




WHO ACCLAIMED NATION'S BEST 

RADIO NEWS OPERATION, FOR 

SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR 



BY NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

OF RADIO NEWS DIRECTORS 




At recent convention of National Asso- 
ciation of Radio News Directors, Baskett 
Mosse, chairman of committee judges, said: 
"The Medill School of Journalism of 
Northwestern University is happy to an- 
nounce tonight that radio station WHO, 
Des Moines, Iowa, was selected as the out- 
standing radio news operation in the United 
States for 1952". 

In presenting the award Mosse said: 
"This is the first time in the history of the 
National Association of Radio News Direc- 
tors that the awards committee has selected 
a radio station as the outstanding radio news 
operation in the country for the second 
consecutive year. I think this is an unusual 
honor and I know that you are proud of it 
and we are really proud to give it to you. 
Not to take anything away from the other 
entries in this contest, but I would like to 
say that your particular entry won this 
award by unanimous vote. Every judge 
on our awards committee voted for WHO 
as the outstanding radio news operation — 
1952". 

BEST EQUIPMENT, VETERAN 
STAFF. BIG BUDGET 

The WHO News Bureau has an im- 
pressive physical plant: six leased-wire 
machines; a portable battery-operated tape 
recorder; a telephone recorder; three short- 
wave monitors for state and city police and 
fire department broadcasts; a number of 
subscription services; and a library which 
includes several specialized news encyclo- 
pedias. 

The six leased-wire machines include two 
Associated Press, two United Press and 
two International News Service machines. 
WHO's leased-wire service exceeds the 
facilities used by many of the country's 
leading daily newspapers; and is unsur- 
passed by any radio station in this section 
of the country. Only two of the six 



machines are "radio" wires — the other 
four bring in detailed stories known as 
"press" wire service. Press wire service 
gives lengthy accounts and the three news 
services bring in three different versions 
of the big stories around the world. This 
necessitates constant boiling down, rewrit- 
ing and sifting of details, playing up news 
of local interest — all tailored to fit a 
split-second time period. 

NINE VETERAN REPORTERS 
EDIT AND BROADCAST NEWS 

Proud as we are of this award, we are 
more proud of the people on our staff who 
helped us win it. The WHO News Bureau 
is headed by veteran Jack Shelley, and in- 
cludes eight other full-time men and a 
secretary. Eight of the men are college- 
trained reporters, rewriters and broadcasters, 
all of whom are heard regularly on the air. 
The ninth man is a specialist in political 
reporting. The ten people on the staff rep- 
resent a total of 100 years' experience in 
news work. Five of the News Bureau staff 
have been with WHO ten or more years. 

In addition to the regular full-time staff, 
the WHO News Bureau maintains a staff 
of 70 correspondents — or part-time re- 
porters — throughout Iowa and in Southern 
Minnesota and Northern Missouri, heavy 
WHO listening areas. 

TELEPHONE USED EXTENSIVELY 

The WHO News Bureau uses the local 
and long-distance telephone extensively to 
supplement and verify the regular news 
services' coverage. Staff members check di- 
rectly with peace officers and hospitals each 
morning to get accident reports and acci- 
dent victims' conditions which may have 
changed since the late night news reports. 
In many instances, the leased-wire services 
do not clear this type of information until 
too late for a 7:30 a.m. — or even an 8:45 



a.m. — newscast. Telephone checks also 
minimize the possibility of loss of news 
when events take place in remote areas, 
distant from a news service reporter. 

STAFF WORKS TWO SHIFTS 

The WHO News Bureau maintains a 
morning and a night shift. There is a cer- 
tain amount of specialization within each 
shift in that one man may be assigned 
Washington and foreign news, another Iowa 
news, and a third miscellaneous human- 
interest stories. Whatever the assignment, 
the reporter stays on it for an indefinite 
period, building up a background for that 
specific job, and becoming a specialized 
reporter on that shift. Each shift writes its 
news copy especially for the men who will 
be airing it. 

$100,000 ANNUAL BUDGET 

To operate its award-winning News Bu- 
reau and to provide Iowa-Plus listeners with 
unexcelled news coverage, WHO spends 
more than $100,000 annually. This figure 
is believed to be one of the highest figures 
in the Nation. 

PUBLIC SERVICE EXTRAS 

In addition to its regular news services, 
the WHO News Bureau provides its lis- 
teners with a variety of public-service extras. 
These include free announcements regard- 
ing public and private meetings during 
periods of extreme weather conditions, up- 
to-the-minute reports on road and weather 
conditions and emergency calls on newscasts 
to locate families or members of families 
who are traveling or are visiting away from 
home, etc. The News Bureau has also de- 
veloped a system whereby a copy of each 
newscast mentioning an Iowa serviceman 
is sent to the next of kin. This service has 
required the cooperation of local postmasters 
in many cases because of the lack of a 
street address or the name of the next of 
kin. Management at WHO considers the 
public service aspect . . . the many extra 
"little things" that WHO does for its listen- 
ing public ... to be the difference between 
a routine news operation and one that is 
contributing to the welfare of the com- 
munity. This — then — is the difference 
between a good news operation and the 
"Best Radio News Operation in the United 
States". 

BETTER NEWS — BETTER AUDIENCES 

The leadership of WHO's News Service 
is only one of many reasons why WHO is 
Iowa's greatest advertising values. The 1952 
Iowa Radio Audience Survey, accepted by 
leading advertisers and agencies as a com- 
pletely authoritative analysis of listening 
habits in this state, shows that WHO is by 
far the "most-listened-to" station in Iowa. 
Write for your copy, or ask Free & Peters. 

+ WHO for Iowa Plus! + 

DES MOINES . . . 50,000 WATTS 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 



26 JANUARY 1953 



21 



RCA ANNOUNCES 








This new film camera does 

for TV film presentations what 
RCA's new TK-llA studio 
camera is doing for "live" pick- 
ups. The TK-20D camera pro- 




vides a remarkable advancement 
in picture quality and operating 
convenience over former types 
— puts "live" quality into films 
regardless of scene content or 
shading. Low picture noise 
level compares with the low 
noise level of "live" pick-ups. 

Operated in conjunction with 
anRCATP-9BFilmMultiplexer, 
one TK-20D Film Camera pro- 
vides show continuity with any 
one of the following set-ups: 
(1) two RCA TP-16D 16mm 
Film Projectors, (2) two RCA 



TP-6A Professional Film Pro- 
jectors, (3) two RCA 35mm 
Film Projectors, (4) one 16mm 
and one 35mm Film Projector, 
(5) or one projector of either 
type and a slide projector. 

With TV programming em- 
phasis more and more on films, 
let us help you get the most from 
film— with the new TK-20D. 
Your RCA Broadcast Sales Rep- 
resentative is ready to help you 
plan the right film system for 
your station— with everything 
matched for best res// Its! 



Iconoscope beam current control, with indicator. A new arrangement 
that takes the guesswork out of day-to-day adjustments — provides a 
standard of comparison to help the operator adjust for optimum pic- 
ture quality. The panel mounts on the housing of the film camera 
console, or in the remote control console. 




.Jfc— *-— »*»■«> ' " 



fe'/X^""' 



I 



&$ 



k 



j-A-2^ 



• "Live" quality all the time — regardless of 
scene content, shading, or other adjustments. 
New back-lighting system, and new auto- 
matic black-level control permits the TK-20A 
virtually to run itself! 



• "Noise-free" pictures comparable to "live" 
shows. New high-gain cascode preamplifier, 
with "noise-immune" circuits, offers 200-to-1 
improvement in microphonics. No high- 
frequency overshoot (trailing white lines). No 
low-frequency trailing (smear). 



• Good-bye edge flare. New edge-lighting 
system provides substantial reduction in stray 
light, improves storage characteristic, stops 
light beam reflections on Iconoscope mosaic. 
Adjustable light level is provided. 



* No more a-c power line "glitches" (hori- 
zontal-bar interference) — because camera fila- 
ments are operated from a separate d-c source. 



• Faithful, high-quality pictures every day — 
through new beam-current control circuit. No 
more need to "ride" the shading. 



RADIO COR 



£\ 



ATI ON of AMERICA 




ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT 



CAMDEN. N.J. 




TV 
POWER 

IN THE Ml NN EAPOL 

Here are the factors which 
combine to produce effective 
TV Power: 

Facilities . . . 

Maximum power of 100,000 watts 
. . . highest antenna in the area . . . 
studios with camera, audio, film, 
and remote facilities usually found 
only in major TV centers. 

Personalities ,, . 

Best known, more experienced, 
most traveled performers in the 
northwest . . . top radio favorites 
for two decades. It's the station 
with "names"— Cedric Adams, 
Rollie Johnson, Bob DeHaven, 
Arle Haeberle—stiH better known 
today on TV. 

Personnel. . . 

An imaginative staff with "know 
how" in sales showmanship — 
made possible by years of ex- 
perience in radio and TV SALES. 

THIS COMBINATION HAS 
ALREADY PROVED ITS 
EFFECTIVE SELLING POWER 
IN THE MINNEAPOLIS- 
ST. PAUL MARKET 
-CBS- 



Nationally represented by 
FREE & PETERS 




24 



SPONSOR 



Figures /%. C. Nielsen ttses now under- 
estimate multiple sets bu one-thirtl 



l-SET HOMES 


2-SET HOMES 


3-SET HOMES 


71.4% 


27.6% 


1% 



Present Audimeter sample based on outdated figures above 
may be readjusted to correspond with new multiple-set figures 
below which were gathered by Nielsen in 100,000-/iome coverage 
study. Nielsen executive at left is C. G. Shaw, executive v.p. 




NIEL1EN RATINGS MAY BE WEIGHTED SOON TO CORRESPOND WITH MULTIPLE-SET COUNT ABOVE. LATER, SAMPLE MAY CHANGE 

Coming: better Nielsen ratings? 

NCS by-product may be measurement of multiple sets on new Audimeter 



_^J major change in the A. C. Nielsen Co.'s nationwide 
Audimeter sample, basic research tool of network-level 
broadcasting, may soon be in the works. The changes 
wrought by such a shakeup might alter everything from 
advertisers' ccsts-per- 1,000 to the relative rating streng hs 
of the four leading radio networks. 

Main element of the proposed changes: alteration of the 
Nielsen Audimeter sample so that its basic proportions re- 
flect the true incidence of multiple-set U.S. radio homes. 
Next step: installation of a new Audimeter, the "Multiple 
Receiver Meter." which can mea-ure on a single Nielsen 

26 JANUARY 1953 



tape the tuning done to three radios and one TV receiver. 

The new plan to adjust the Audimeter sample was an- 
nounced by A. C. Nielsen himself at a closed meeting in 
New York City on 14 January. Present at this meeting were 
research staffs of major radio webs and Nielsen brass. 

V. Isen's proposals are actually a by-product of the find- 
ings of the Nielsen Coverage Service, whose primary job is 
to check into radio and TV coverage and circulation. As 
the photo and chart at the top of this page show, there is a 
discrepancy between the multiple-set homes Nielsen in- 
cludes in his Audimeter sample and what \CS found true 



25 



• ...... ..a. Ai. ......... .1 .11.. .1111111 || ITTTTTTT 

••• •••••■••••■•■••. ••■■••■•••■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■uaaa a a a • a a a a 

-•..•..........••a .>..>..>..aa«.a.aaaaaaaaaaa..>.a>.aaaaaaa a ■ a a 

• ••>*. *««>..»••>... .*.aaaaaa.aaaaaaaaa«..........a..aaBa.«.> a a 

-••••••■«.«. .•••aaa.a.. ........ .a.aaaa.. ........ a. *aa. a a. 



a a 
i a a 

• a • 



••••••.•*.**«...->•••>. a. •..aaaaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaBa......>.BB.a«. a a a • ■ ■ a 

'••••* ......••.•.•••..•...aaaaa.taa.aaaaaaa.o.. a. *..«..•■■■ a a a a a a a a a% 

•• ••*•..•«..•>>>•••.....». a. aaaa.ataaaaeaaaaa*. »•■«.. a. ..aaa. a a a a a a a a 
• • • aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa. aaaaaaaBa«BB.aaaaaaaaaaasaaa..BBia a a a a a^a a a a a a a 



a a a a 



a a a a a a a 



These 8 basics come from NCS study 

fitiit?: spring, 7952. Method: At least 90% personal interview. 
Sample size: 100,000 home cross-section of the U.S. 



1. Total U.S. families ■ 

2. Total U.S. radio ftimilie 



44,719,700 
43,849,460 



a a • • 
t • » » 



» * * » * 



• » » m • 



• ••••••< 



aaaaaaaaa 

• ••»»•••»» 

aaaaaaaaaa 
aaaaaaaaa 

aaaaaaaaa 

aaaaaaaaa 

aaaaaaaaa 

• •»»»»»»m 

aaaaaaaaaa 

aaaaaaaaa 

aaaaaaaaa 



• aaaaaaaaa 
aaaaaaaaa 

• aaaaaaaaa 
aaaaaaaaa 



3. Cor-oirniiic/ families 33,581,870 

4. Total families with one or mitre ear radios* 22,630.820 

5. Total U.S. TV families-* 17,706,930 

6. Total radio receivers in U.S. homes 70,175,670 

7. Total radio and TV home reeeivers in U.S 87,882,600 

8. Total broadeast reeeivers. home anil auto, in U.S.* * 1 1 0,51 3,420 



This figure is lower than the 27.5U0.000 radio-equipped autos estimated to be in U.S. in early 1952 by Broad- 
< ast Advertising Bureau. However, NCS figures cover families, many of whom own two cars — both radio- 
equipped. Total NCS auto set figures, when finally compiled, will probably be midway between NCS family, 
BAB total figures. Auto listening is largest single item in out-of-home. 

See photo on opposite page for comparison between NCS TV-home figures and those of NBC Research. 

A conservative estimate, since full extent of actual auto radio sets is not represented by count of families 
alio own "one or more" car radios. Croud total may be nearly 115,000.000 broadcast-receivers in I .S. 



ssss, 

m 




of I .S. multiple-set homes. To bridge 
this gap. Nielsen worked out a series of 
packaged plans to change the NRI-NT1 
sample, and pitched them to the net- 
works. In effect, at the mid-Januar) 
meeting. Nielsen stated to the net- 
works: "This is what I have found to 
he true of radio-TV today. This is what 
I can offer you in the wa\ of chanties. 
This is what the changes will cost." 

Now. the next move is up to the net- 
work-, who have to agree on one ol 
the three Nielsen-proposed plans, or 



else agree on a new plan which is a 
compromise among them. 

When land if I ABC. CBS. MBS r and 
NBC agree on a plan designed to 
change the NRI-NTI sample advertisers 
and agencies are likely to find that: 

'• Radio network rating averages 
will move upwards a few notches. Niel- 
sen s own prediction is that the average 
rating might move up "about 5%." 
Naturally, there would be variations, 
up and down, between individual pro- 
grams, depending on the listening lhe\ 



receive in a revamped sample. 

'*• Radio in TV homes is stronger 
than many admen think. As NCS fig- 
ures show, half of the "three-or-more"- 
set homes are also TV homes, a higher 
proportion than the country as a whole. 
Other NCS figures relating to this 
point up the conclusion many research- 
ers have reached — TV has a tendency 
to scatter radio listening into rooms 
other than the living r n. not elimi- 
nate it. 

•'*• Radio's cost-per-1,000 picture 



26 



SPONSOR 



m<iy change in radio's favor. Obvi- 
ously, if costs remain the same in radio 
and a rating average moves up. the 
cost-per-1,000 homes will drop an 
equivalent amount. 

J. The relative strengths of the ma- 
jor networks will change somewhat. 
The present NRI-NTI sample, several 
network researchers feel, introduces a 
bias factor, because the sample isn't a 
cross-section of true multiple-set homes 
and because of recent population shifts 
in the U.S. When the NRI-NTI sample 
is adjusted, they add. advertisers will 
be in a better position to evaluate net- 
work pitches. 

Setting up a revamped NRI-NTI 
sample is no easy job, as any adman 
familiar with Nielsen's methods knows. 
A whole new "miniature U.S." must be 
worked out carefully, audimeters in- 
stalled or relocated, compiling methods 
adjusted to handle the findings of the 
new multi-set Audimeters. 

It's a costly task; networks will prob- 
ably pay from $150 to $250 a month 
per network on top of their present 
Nielsen rating costs, if the plan goes 
through. And, the job might take up 
to two years to complete, since the al- 
terations in Nielsen's rating structure 
must be done while the clients are still 
using it. 

Realizing this. Art Nielsen has 
evolved a sort of interim arrangement 
whereby networks won't have to wait 
two years to get better ratings. Using 
the multiple-set data from Nielsen 
Coverage Service, Nielsen has devised 
a "weighting" system, whereby old- 
style ratings can be weighted properly 
into new-style ones, starting 30 days 
after the webs approve Nielsen's plans. 
Such a system is a good deal better 
than no system at all. but it is open to 
mathematical error and would be grad- 
ually dropped as the sample is altered. 

Other changes: Unless the networks 
are willing to pay more than the dollar 
amounts mentioned above, the NRI- 
NTI reports may have to come out once 
a month, instead of every two weeks. 
And. to avoid the high costs of mak- 
ing a sizable number of new Audi- 
meters to correct the sample by enlarg- 
ing it and bringing it up to the NCS 
proportions, the existing Audimeters 
may simply be relocated. This method 
would lower the total sample size from 
some 1,500 homes to about 1.200 
homes. 

But. as a network radio research 

26 JANUARY 1953 



chief put it to SPONSOR, "such sacrifices 
are well worth it it a (hanged NRI-NTI 
sample puts radio in its proper light. 

Nielsen's next step will probahlv he 
to make a similar pitch to agency and 
advertiser subscribers, informing them 
of the additional charges that max oc- 
cur as a result of juggling the NRI- 
NTI Audimeter group. 

Although it's probably the most dra- 
matic bv -product of last spring's NCS 
study, the proposal by Nielsen to 
change his rating sample on the basis 
of NCS is not the only development 
connected with the coverage survey. 

Since NCS measure- qualitative as- 
pects of radio and TV circulation, un- 
like Dr. Ken Baker's SAM. it pro\ide I 
many up-to-date clues as to the size and 
shape of U.S. radio. I For news of 
SAM, see story page 34.) 

Admen now have a set of "Radio-TV 
Basics" to work with (see box. page 
26) which update a great deal of 
earlier, and less extensive, research on 
everything from the amount of multi- 
ple-set homes in the U.S. to the facts 
and figures of auto radio ownership. 

This is in addition to the Complete 
Circulation Reports and NCS Station 
Reports which are expected to have a 
profound effect on large-scale agency 
time buying methods in spot radio and 
TV. These reports — the "CCR" is a 
series of 48 state area reports covering 
the U.S., and is the one to which most 



\( :-- lu\ cp i ing agencies have subscribed 
— are expected to be in admen's hands 
soon alter this issue of sponsok ap- 
pears. 

Special analysis of the over-all N< S 
qualitative data gives the first "total 
picture" look of U.S. radio in man) 
months. \nd. since NCS used a sam- 
ple of L00,000 homes and did at least 
'-")' i of its research digging b\ per- 
sonal interviews, it's certainly the most 
extensive qualitative study. 

Key findings of interest to broadcast 
advertisers: 

*■ U.S. radio is huge. Even with 
such items as "sets used less than one 
hour a month," auto radios. FM-onlj 
radios, sets in out-of-home business 
locations, and non-home-operated por- 
tables dropped from the count, the 
number of radio receivers in U.S. 
homes (as of spring I T>:> i was found 
to be 70,175,670. When auto radios — 
largest single component of out-of- 
home listening — are added to this, the 
total jumps up to over 90,000,000 ra- 
dios in the U.S. 

'*• Television swells the receiver to- 
tals to well over 100,000,000. The NCS 
count of U.S. TV homes as of last 
spring, it's interesting to note, is quite 
close to the figures compiled h\ NBC's 
research department which have been 
used widely throughout the T\ indus- 
try since video began to boom after 
I Please turn to page 93 I 



HotC many TV St'tS? NCS TV set total for June '52 corroborates NBC TV count tor 
month (figures below in picture of A. C. Nielsen). This bears out accuracy of both studies 







~\- 



*, •'■■ 






I 



'Si 









Depth-psychology studies shape tl this successful TV pitch 



(Prepared by Weiss & Geller For "Where Was I?") 



VIDEO 

Camera directions 

Open on over Announcer 
Bob Williams' shoulder CU 
of page in old album as it 
lies open in Bob's lap. 

Diz to tight CU of decanter 
and empty glass on table. 
Old-fashioned lamp, etc. in 
BG. Bob's hand pours slowly 
from decanter into glass. If 
this shot isn't tight, it's no 
good. Dolly back to MCU of 
Bob as he lifts glass and 
drinks wine. 

Pan to follow Bob as he rises 
and walks toward "Home- 
Sweet-Home" simpler on 
wall. When he gets there, 
dolly in tight on sampler 
itself and hold tit! close. 



7* 




AUDIO 

Music: Silccr Threads, etc. Under: 

A taste of the good old days! Remember the old 
family album that occupied the place of honor in 
every living room? Even today, it's pleasant to 
look around old pictures of family and friends 
and recall the past. There's a taste of the good 
old days in every sip of MOGEN DAVID wine, 
too, that will bring those happy memories to life. 



You see, MOGEN DAVID tastes exactly like the 
wonderful CONCORD grape wine that Grandma used 
to make at home . . . so much like Grandma's 
homemade wine, in fact, that a lot of folks call 
MOGEN DAVID "The Home-Sweet-Home Wine." 
MOGEN DAVID isn't a sophisticated "dress-up 
drink" at all. It's just a friendly, homey beverage 
that everybody likes because it's sweet, but never 
too siveet. Any time you're together with family or 
friends is time to enjoy delicious, inexpensive 
MOGEN DAVID. Keep a couple of decanters in the 
refrigerator and enjoy it often. Be sura you ask 
for MOGEN DAVID— The Home-Sweet-Home Wine. 



Mogen David 

wine like Grandma used, to make 



Nostalgia theme is plugged in recipe books offered on TV 



»»1^^^^ 



TV and psychiatry boom Mogen Davi 

Kosher wine zooms to top in many markets when newest ad Biiedinm and 
seienee team to appeal to basie reason why people buy beverage 



ffj[ ere's how two men of decision, 
plus psychiatry, plus television took a 
sacramental kosher wine and built it 
into a leading table wine lor Jews and 
gentiles alike in two years. 

Mogen David's partners and broth- 
ers-in-law, Max Cohen and Henry A. 
Markus, are the men of action. 

In L933 thej borrowed $1,500 on 
Mrs. Cohen's jewels, another $3,500 
from a friend, and went into the wine 
business six months before prohibi- 
tion was repealed. 

(They didn't bootleg the wine; it 
was sold to synagogues, churches, and 
drugstores. I 

In 1947 they decided to switch from 



28 



making Barloma to Mogen David wine 
entirely. So they opened the drain 
cocks on all the vats in their Wine 
Corp. of America storage room in Chi- 
cago and poured 40,000 gallons down 
the drain. 

In 1950 Ed Weiss, pre.-ident of Weiss 
& Geller, Chicago, himself a man of 
action, came to them with a television 
presentation. He stressed how (lie so- 
cial sciences, especially psychiatry, 
could be used to determine \\h\ people 



c a 



s e h 



i s t o r y 



buy wine and then copy could be writ- 
ten to appeal to these motives and TV 
employed to get the greatest impact. 

When Weiss was through, Cohen and 
Markus said, "Okay," and the Wine 
Corp. of America plunged into TV in 
1950. fittingly enough with Can You 
Top This. 

They haven't regretted their decision. 

"We started at $1,000 a week; it's 
now $20,000 a week," Markus told 
sponsor. "I cant say we're sorry we're 
spending it." 

Reason: Mogen David has swept to 
the top among sweet Concord grape 
wines in many markets across the coun- 
try In fact Wines & lines calls it 

SPONSOR 



probably the most phenomenal rise of 
any brand in U.S. wine history. 

The 1953 ad budget will be around 
$1.4 million (up $100,000 over 1952) 
with $500,000 in TV, $350,000 for ra- 
dio, $350,000 for outdoor, $200,000 
for papers, and a sizable sum for point- 
of-sale, according to Weiss & Geller 
executives. Mogen David's on TV now 
with Where Was L a panel show, over 
39 Du Mont stations, at $20,000 a week 
for time and talent. It also bought the 
five-minute John Cameron Swayze news 
commentary, Sidelights oj the News, 
which is on at 10:30 to 10:35 p.m. 
three times a week, over 186 NBC 
Radio stations for six weeks at the close 
of the year — 20 November to 2 Jan- 
uary for an extra holiday punch. More 
network radio will be used in 1953. 

Markus characteristically gives Weiss 
& Geller the credit for the Mogen David 
boom. And Ed Weiss pays tribute to 
psychiatry and television. 

Here's how Mogen David got to the 
top — as related by the three men most 
intimately connected with jts three 
phases: Henry Markus. v. p. who has 
charge of sales, advertising, and sales 
promotion: Edward H. Weiss, presi- 
dent of Weiss & Geller, who brought 
psychiatr\ into wine selling, and Mar- 
vin Mann, Weiss' v.p., director of ra- 
dio-TV, end account director for Mo- 
gen David, who sells the wine via TV. 

Mogen David in TV: "The \\ ine 
Corp.'s only experience with the air 
media prior to 1950 wa; in radio where 
it employed announcements in 15 mar- 
kets for four or five years. ' Mann says. 
"It concentrated its advertising on out- 
door and newspaper. First IV show 
was Can You Top This, ABC (out of 
New York l on about 15-20 slations. 
It was the original radio show with 
Peter Donald. Harry Hirsbfield. Sena- 




A pleasant family wine, Mogen David needed TV show to match; "Where Was I?" was chosen 



tor Ford. Joe Laurie Jr.. and Ward 
Wilson adapted lor TV. It cost $8,000 
to $9,000 tor time and taient (hall 
hour) and was sponsored by Mogen 
Da\id from the fall of 1950 till the 
spring of 1951, 26 weeks. Total cost 
was thus about $208,000. 

"'Results? It was an acceptable show. 
Nothing ratingwise — reached a 9 or 
ID Nielsen. From the merchandising 
standpoint, however, the results were 
very satisfactory. The show made the 
dealers hot for TV. It proved that this 
type of product could be sold on tele- 
vision and that's where the bulk of the 
ad money should go. 

"We were happy about it at the 
agency, for the Wine Corp. of America 
had wanted to run a spot campaign to 
test TV first. We encouraged them to 
gamble with a network show. There 



was an immediate sales response to 1 \ 
that hadn't been felt in the other media. 
V\e knew then we were going to con- 
centrate the ad budget on TV as long 
as it brought such results." 

The second TV show for Mogen Da- 
vid was Charlie H ild, Detective, on 30 
ABC TV stations from the fall of 1951 
until March 1952 and then on 34 Du 
Mont stations into the summer of 1952. 
( Nothing was used during the summer 
of 1951.1 The 39-week show was put 
on opposite Milton Berle and Frank 
Sinatra (8:00 p.m. Tuesdays), opened 
with an 11 Nielsen and before the 
switch to Du Mont climbed to a 14. 
Cost was $16,000 a week and the total 
spent, approximately $500,000. John 
McQuade played the lead. Mann say* 
networks were switched because of bet- 
ter clearances and time period. 



MOGEN DAVID MERCHANDISES ITS ADVERTISING, SALES POSITION HEAVILY AMONG WHOLESALERS WITH PIECES LIKE THIS 




"H 






a, 



% 



<JV, 



*1ogen David I 

WINE 





~M^K 



I 



Mogen David will spend ?350,000 on radio in 1953. SBC Commentator John Cam- 
eron Swayze's Sidelights oi the News wis sponsored over 186 stations tor 6 weeks 
into early January l" r holiday punch. Network radio and Tl will be nseil this \ear 



Results: "Charlie Wild proved con- 
clusively that Mogen David belonged 
on TV," Mann recalls. "With proper 
net and show, they could effectively 
use large-scale TV operation. For ex- 
ample, we offered a wine recipe book 
free. Requests ran to 2.000 a week. A 
sur\e\ showed later that 87% of the 
people who had written to request the 
book immediately bought Mogen Da- 
vid."" 

I hemes plugged on the air and in 
outdoor and newspaper advertising: 
"Mogen David — sweet but never too 
sited : "the home-sweet-home wine 
that Grandma used to make": "the 
largest selling wine of its kind in the 
world": "a taste of the good old days." 



However, it was felt the association 
between a crime show and the product 
was bad. When research supported this 
view. Mogen David switched to a dif- 
ferenl tv pe of program. 

"Mogen David took an inexpensive 
summer show this past year,*' Mann 
says. "The company always felt wine 
could be sold in the summer. To prove 
this and maintain the station line-up. 
we got Guess What, a panel show, for 
13 weeks on Du Mont. Dick Kollmar 
was moderator. Panel consisted of 
Quentin Re\ nolds. Bettv Betz. Mark 
Hanna. and Virginia Peine. The show 
involved guessing a movie-picture se- 
quence. The companv did a lot of 
promotion at the point-of-sale. As a, 



MOGEN DAVID 

is demanded by millions. Here's why: It is delicto 
different from all orher wines. 

as m a ™* 

■7-f > -3#u->a> '*z>-7jtyij m 

wine amaumom o» amoka • cmcmo. ■.** 



Japanese-language ad in Hawaiian newspaper 
illustrates extent of Mogen David advertising. 
It ases all media excei>! magazines, likes Tl 



result, business doubled over the 1951 
summer and also gave us a chance to 
study the panel type of program. This 
decided us to stay with it for special 
identification — it's a pleasant familv- 
tv pe show, and Mogen David is a pleas- 
ant family-type wine.' 

So starting 2 September 1952 Mogen 
David began sponsoring Where Was I 
on 39 Du Mont station- at $20,000 a 
week. A White & Rosenberg produc- 
tion, the show has a panel, consisting 
of John Reed king as moderator and 
panelists Peter Donald. Nancy Guild. 
Writer Sam Grafton, and Shirley Dins- 
dale. Other panelists used were Bettv 
Furness, Ken Roberts. Orson Bean. 
I Please turn to page 7!! I 



MlMlMMMiiMIMIlMlllllllllllMIIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIM^ 

#/# #/ itMaaen iPuriil sates increase came tvith TV 



Period 


Gallons sold 


Advertising budget for 
Mogen David 


Radio 


Television 


1946 


75,000 


none 


none 


none 


1947 


120,000 


none 


none 


none 


1948 


350,000 


$50,000 


none 


none 


1949 


1 ,200,000 


$200,000 


none 


none 


1950* 


2,000.000 


8700.000 


none 


$400,000 


1 95 1 


3,000,000 


8 1 .000.000 


$10,000 


$550,000 


i ;>.■»:> 


:t.:soo.ooo 


s i .:soo.ooo 


SI 00.000 


8770.000 


1953f 


4.200.000 


$1,100,000 


s:i.-b0.ooo 


8500.000 



lii. i TV network program in fall ol 1950. tEstlmated 



illlllllllllllll! mi || Illlllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllilll Illlllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllll I Illllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll MUM MMIMIMI Illlllllll Illllllllllif 



30 



SPONSOR 



Tulsa flower queen does $10,000 
with radio and personal service 

KVOO garden show produced 500% sales increase in 1 1 years 



M aiii certainl) no help to you in 
this 'success' story," Christina Tinger, 
owner of Christina's Flowers. Inc.. in 
Tulsa. Okla.. and president of her 
KVOO Garden Club, modestlj told 
sponsor. '"You see. this is the sort 
of success that radio alone has huilt 
and increased." 

In 1940. when Mrs. Tinger first de- 
cided to sponsor her Garden Club on 
KVOO. annual sales totaled $46,112 
for her two Tulsa shops. Sales volume 
for 1951 was $250,136, or an increase 
of some 500' v since Christinas Gar- 
den Club first went on the air. In 1952. 
sales figures reached a record high of 
$300,000. 

Today. Christina Tinger owns what 
the trade says is the largest retail flow- 
er ;tore on one floor in the entire 



case history 



l niled Slates. In her two Tulsa shops, 
she employs 47 — during busy season, 
as many as 67 — full-time people. The 
firm has five deliver) trucks which are 
kept busy taking care of some 10.000 
accounts that Christina has on the 
books in her two stores. 

Hon- rfid rnc/io do it? Since Christina 
Tinger is an authority in her field — a 
recognized lecturer on gardening and 
plant growing, as well as a renowned 
designer of floral decorations — she de- 
cided on radio as the best medium for 
her to discuss her subject with poten- 
tial customers. The most logical for- 
mat of a program meant to disseminate 
horticultural information as well as ad- 
vertise her two stores was a questions 
and answers program. Her Gardening 
Problems in 1940. over Tulsa's KVOO 
from 7:15 to 7:30 a.m. — a good time 
to reach both amateur and profession- 
al horticulturists — was the first step in 




Founder of Christina Flowers, Inc. \4rs. Tin- 
ger first went on KVOO in 1940. writes own 
scripts, stars on program, is Tulsa favorite 



Christina's 13-year career as a local 
radio personality. 

Then, as now. she invited listeners to 
send in am questions about floral ar- 
langements. indoor and outdoor gar- 
dening that might interest them. In 
the beginning, an announcer read the 
listeners* questions to her. but later 
Christina Untied the program into an 
informal session during which the read 
and answered these ques'ions herself. 
(Please turn to page 89) 



RADIO-INSPIRED DEMAND KEEPS FIVE TRUCKS BUSY SUPPLYING CHRISTINA'S TWO TULSA STORES FROM HER GREEN HOUSES 





1. 



Gimmicks never fail. You need atten- 
tion-getters ut the start — zooms, spins, 
dramatic vignettes, soft-shoe dances — to in- 
trigue the bejahbers out of your audience. 
There's little time left for a message, but 
then you've kept people from tuning out. 



2 Use a lot of words. Most TV commer- 
u cials do. You can then be proud of 
the overly fast sound track, the unneces- 
sary scenes that result. Always remember 
this death knell to all good spots: "If it 
won't fit in pictures, throiv it into audio." 



3 Try magazine phraseology. Something 
o mouthy like "advancement designed 
for the ultimate in performance." Nobody 
talks like this but your audience and your 
announcer will appreciate your trying to. 
In other words, put your Thesaurus to use! 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiira iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii mil in miiimiiiimimiiiiimiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii iiiiimiimiiiiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiimimiiiimimiiiiimiimiiimiiimiiimiiimimim 

6 ways to kill a TV film commercial 

and six ways to save it 



J_ he TV commercial is nothing more, nothing less than 
a salesman. It can be a tremendous, powerful salesman 
moving people to buy, or it can be a stuttering bore, driv- 
ing audiences to burrow into magazines or flee to bath- 
rooms until it's over. 

To help you make your TV commercials giant salesmen 
and not stuttering bores, SPONSOR asked Otis Carney for 
his observations and obtained the illustrations he used for 
a talk on the same subject before the 4 A's Central Council 
in Chicago recently. Carney made hundreds of TV com- 
mercials, live and film, while TV Creative Group Head 
for J. Walter Thompson, Chicago, for two and a half years. 

Here's the gist of his remarks: 

This happens often: You're buttonholed by a friend. 
He can't wait to tell you about the terrific show he saw 
last night. He goes on and on until you ask him who 
sponsored it and what was being sold. That stumps him. 





s. 


Oils Carney is TV veteran 

Contributor of data for this feature 
is 30-year-old co-author oj wartime 
bestseller "Lore at First Flight": has 
written, produced 500 TV commercials 
for JJf'T. Chicago: now writes TV films 



32 



It's the Death of a Salesman all right — the salesman being 
the entire commercial message of the show. The salesman 
died because he didn't sell. 

What killed him? 

Any one of the six items pictured above or a combination 
of them. In addition, there are these three other factors 
which — if they won't kill your salesman — will certainly 
stunt his growth: 

!• The budget problem. Sponsors want cheap commer- 
cials. But the day of the cheap commercial is over. There's 
simply too much competition from good ones. 

2. Rush — a danger inherent to the agency business. 
You can't rush the creation of TV. "Give yourself at least 
three weeks for creation from script to okays — and another 
eight weeks for production," says Carney. 

3. Wrong show or station break. Be sure you know your 
audience composition. You've got to create a salesman 
who'll appeal to, not antagonize, the people he's going 
to meet. 

Then how can you assure the Birth of a Salesman? 
The six points illustrated above, like a prompt midwife, 
should attend the birth of every good salesman. Each ap- 
plies in varying degree to the three basic types of com- 
mercials: (1) entertaining; (2) irritating; (3) informa- 
tive— 75',' of all TV plugs. 

One word of caution: Don't try to combine all three. 
It ivon't ivork! * * * 

SPONSOR 




Use numerous characters. The more 

the better. They all hare to work. So 

I at if your viewer has to keep asking 

nself, "/Vote who's this?" Sure he'll 

ste precious seconds for adjustment. 

t he'll see a lot of fascinating faces! 



5 Let cheesecake bury the product. Rox- 
m anne is doing a good job of attracting 
attention here. Don't distract the men in 
your audience by emphasizing a commer- 
cial. Background is more important. What 
IS the product? Flashbulbs, of course. 



6 0pticals are fun. Try fire clock wipe* 
■ in a 20-second commercial — as has 
happened — if you want to see your au- 
dience's heads going around. Too bad they 
won't be able to remember the product 
but then vtm'll hare avoided straight cuts. 



nimiiiimyiiiiimiiiiiiHiiiiiinfiiiiiii iiii:iiiiiini:iiii;iiii! liiiii iiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiPiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii iiiiiiiiipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiuiiiiiiHii n imiiiiiiii iiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiti 



ffttt Show & tell 
w> ^ same time 







Show and talk about the same thing at the 
.. same time. Don't show one thing on 
^reen and talk about something else. This 
takes the customer wonder which message to 
oncenlrate on. And for TV ads, this is fatal. 




2 Sell product name and label. This means 
m size, shape, and lettering of the package and 
sound of the name. Don't be embarrassed about 
real brand name-selling as so many sponsors, TV 
film producers have been so often in the past. 



3 Sell main appeals of product. 1 on con 
■ sell ALL the appeals, so you must .«■/<•• 
only the MAIIS ones and get them acros 
Sometimes you can do so by entertaining i 
well as informing. Hut keep pitch simpli 



le honest. Make your customer believe in 
on. You don't need gimmicks and tricks, 
stick to the facts about your product and 
hem simply and directly. Avoid exaggera- 
and wild claims. Every person likes honesty. 




be 
honest 



5 Keep your product on the screen. Establish 
m a high time-memory ratio. Your audience 
will remember best what you leave longest on the 
screen, talking about it simultaneously. This 
seems to be the cardinal rule of all TV selling. 



6 Talk about your product. 100' c of 
a audience remembered this Swift Pea- 
nut flutter spot in test. Why? Because 
product was on screen 51 of 60 seconds} 
the voice talked about it for .32 seconds. 



Memory 
equals 







'rtwwk by Claude Olllingwatftr, TV Art Director, JWT, Chicago 

26 JANUARY 1953 



33 




NEW SAM REPORTS, SIMILAR TO 1949'S BMB, ARE THE BRAINCHILD OF VETERAN RESEARCHER DR. KENNETH 

How to get the most out of SAM 



BAKER 



Coverage firm's chief herein gives "Baker's Dozen** tips lo radio admen 



*The initials "SAM" refer to Standard 
Audit & Measurement Services, Inc., 
one oj the two firms which measure 
radio and 77 station home circulation 
and coverage. The other is "NCS," or 
the Nielsen Coverage Service. 

J^ or the past three weeks, admen at 
some 123 agencies and 25 member 
firms of the ANA have had their first 
good look at the L949-1952 develop- 
ments and trends in I .S. radio station 
circulation. 

I his opportunity to stud\ the size. 
shape, and appearance of radio has 
come in the form of 400 BMB-type sta- 
tion coverage reports from Standard 



34 



Audit & Measurement Services. First 
of the two major coverage services to 
deliver station circulation data into ad- 
men's hands, SAM's reports are already 
changing the time buying habits of 
many agencies and advertisers. 

An early reaction from Victor Sey- 
del, radio-TV director of New York's 
Anderson & Cairns, a medium-sized ad 
agency, was typical : 

"The radio station coverage data of 
SAM will prove a valuable tool and a 



research 



useful map by which lo plot oui spot 
time buying course in 1953. Today, 
when radio must be bought carefully 
in order to get the most value for the 
client's ad dollar, up-to-date coverage 
data is a must." 

Research-minded admen, who have 
compared the 1952 SAM data with 
1949 BMB figures (NCS figures, 
though roughly similar and more elab- 
orate, are not directly comparable to 
the old BMB figures) discover that 
four major influences have caused 
sweeping changes in radio during the 
past four years: 

'• Radio homes in the U.S. have in- 
creased about 8% (up 3.500.000), ac- 

SPONSOR 






wording to a comparison of 1949 BMB 
and 1952 SAM total radio homes. 

2. The total number of U.S. radio 
outlets has also increased. Some 400 
new AM and FM stations have gone on 
the air since 1949, according to the 
FCC's files. 

3. Still more changes in radio sta- 
tion circulation have been made by 
power and signal adjustments, some 
200 of which have occurred since 1949. 

4. Television has had a noticeable 
influence on radio. But TV's effects 
have sometimes been canceled out by 
other factors of radio growth. 

Basic time buying uses of SAM's new 
station reports are largely unchanged 
from those of the 1949 BMB. Like the 
earlier circulation reports, SAM will 
aid agencies and advertisers in : 

Selecting stations for spot radio 
campaigns on the basis of station cir- 
culation in given areas, and on the 
basis of total coverage. 

Matching distribution areas with 
station coverage and circulation in key 
market areas, and to relate advertising 
costs to product sales in a given mar- 
ket in various parts of the U.S. 

For making inter-media comparisons, 
SAM circulation figures are compara- 
ble to those of printed media, like 
newspapers and magazines. 

To aid agencies and their clients in 
making best use of the data, sponsor 
turned to Dr. Kenneth H. Baker, the 
ex-BMB official who heads up SAM. 
asked him to explore the differences in 
appearances and use between the 1949 
BMB reports and those of SAM. 

( In the near future, sponsor also 
intends to report similarly on the uses 
of NCS data, once the "Complete Cir- 
culation Reports" of Nielsen Coverage 
Service are in subscribers' hands. For 
news of radio trends revealed by NCS's 
qualitative coverage studies, see page 
25 of this issue.) 

Here are "Baker's Dozen" tips and 
pointers to admen who seek the latest 
methods of applying the SAM station 
reports to the problems of radio time 
buying: 

J. Treat SAM "audience" figures 
as "circulation'' in buying spot 
radio: "Actually," states SAM's Dr. 
Baker, "these figures tell you the num- 
ber of homes reached by a radio sta- 
tion and this is exactly what newspa- 
pers and magazines mean by the word 
'circulation.' It's not merely the num- 
ber of homes, in a county or city, with- 
in the audible or listenable range of the 



station. Buyers are generally interested 
in the number and location of homes 
that do listen to a station — not those 
who can listen. This distinction is im- 
portant." 

2. Family figures are more im- 
portant thai, percentages: As in 

the 1949 BMB, distinctions made be- 
tween a station that delivers, say, 93* - 
of its home county and another which 
delivers 80% of its home county in its 
total weekly audiences are meaningless 
— unless both stations are located in 
the same counts . 

"It may very easily happen that 
80% of one county will mean many 
more families than 93'v of another 
county." Baker points out, adding. 
"This seems so elementary that it 
should hardly need emphasis. Yet. it 



is not unusual to find a buyer who will 
start his time buying operation with a 
rule such as 'We don't even consider a 
station unless it delivers S0% or more 
of its home county." It's quite possi- 
ble that some good buys are missed he- 
cause of such agency or client rulings." 

3. Station circulation figures 
should be compared with station 
rates: \ useful index in Inning spot 
radio is that of the station's average 
cost-per-l,000-homes-delivered. based 
on coverage data. Baker feels. This is 
basically similar to the rnilline rate of 
printed media. Of course, this gives 
an advertiser no guarantee that his 
show will gather audience at the sta- 
tion's "average" delivered price: a 
show ma\ do better or worse than 
(Please turn to page 84) 



Iiiiiiiiiiiii in iiiiiiiiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



"Baher's Dozen" tips on using SAM data 



1. Circulation: SAM audience figures 
should be considered as being basicalh 
similar to printed -media conception of "cir- 
culation." They reflect, county '•by-county, 
the number of homes a radio station regu- 
larly reaches weekly, daily, in its area 

2. "Families" vs. "%": Percent- 
ages, Baker feels, are often misleading. 
when a station's listening strength in a 
county is being weighed. Always check the 
number of families represented by a "%" 
figure; each V . S. county's total varies 

3. Station rates: Measuring a sta- 
tion's SAM audience averages against its 
rates provides a useful index of its adver- 
tising efficiency. Baker feels. This is simi- 
lar to the "rnilline rate" measurements of 
newspapers, iveeklies, other j>rint media 

4. Ratings: Like readership data, rat- 
ings indicate good locations in the chosen 
station's schedule, and are thus related 
closely to basic time buying processes in- 
volving coverage data. Ratings team well 
with SAM station reports, pinpoint a bin 

5. Costs-per-M: Figuring costs-per- 
1,000 homes is, in turn, not so simple. 
Ratings should not be projected against 
circulation, Baker believes, unless the rat- 
ings are projectible to the station s entire 
coverage area, as shown in SAM reports 

6. Levels: Agency process of setting an 
arbitrary "level" (i.e., "50% or better") 
on which to buy time can be misleading, 
due to mathematical variations in SAhl 
process, plus fact that number of homes 
in a county can range widely, says Baker 



7. Radio vs. TV: SAM data shows, as 
compared with 19 l l J BMB, how many lead- 
ing radio outlets have stood up against TV 
through the years. It's dangerous to con- 
sider radio stations in TV areas as "lost"; 
many have gained in the face of video 

8. '49 comparisons: Radio has un- 
dergone many changes apart from TV since 
the 1949 BMB appeared. Many stations 
have upped their transmitting power. A 
comparison between 1949 BMB and SAM 
data shows effects of such power changes 

9. !%on-buying use: SAM data can 
be used to match coverage of existing ra- 
dio campaigns with distributorships, sales 
territories, etc. Dealer co-op campaigns 
can be evaluated so that retailers pay their 
share based on SAM coverage statistics 

10. Market plans: SAM data is so 
planned that special area studies can be 
made (at cost) for admen. Thus, the best 
stations to reach a particular market can 
be selected rapidly, and waste circulation 
avoided in a county or group of counties 

11. Ties: Sometimes, stations seem to 
have identical circulation. Such ties can be 
broken by checking SAM daily audiences 
as opposed to weekly cumulative figures, 
and by checking ratings of station avail- 
abilities offered agencies by tied stations 

12. Types: Practice of t\j>ing stations 
and making generalizations about their 
circulation is deceptive. Baker warns. Such 
short cuts would short-change stations that 
specialize in reaching specialized audiences 
such as farmers, foreign-language groups 



13. SAM isn't popularity Contest: St<ition audiences are determined by a long series 
of factors, which are constantly in a state of flux. Anything from a change in network af- 
filiation to a new manager can change a station's ad value. Avoid buying on a formula basis 



26 JANUARY 1953 



35 



Radio is Shell Chemical's spe< 
insects strike the farm 



M here are few businesses as unpre- 
dictable as the business of supplying 
agricultural insecticides to farmers. 
Linked as it is with farming itself, it 
is plagued by the wanton habits of 
the weather, by floods and drought, by 
the Midden appearance of insect pests. 

An advertiser seeking to put across 
his message to farmers when it is most 
timely needs a flexible medium, one 
that can be swiftly stripped for action 
in an emergency. Shell Chemical Corp. 
has found that flexibility and speed 
in spot radio. 

Here, in a nutshell, is why Shell 
Chemical needs a medium like spot 
radio to reach farmers: 

Item: Shell advertises its insecticide, 
Aldrin. for a variety of cotton pests. 
One group of pests must be fought in 
the early spring, another in the late 
spring, another in the summer. Ad- 
vertising must be timed with the ap- 
pearance of each pe t. The proper ra- 
dio commercials must be rushed to ra- 
dio stations in case of a sudden infes- 
tation, which often happens. 

Item: Shell's soil fumigant. D-D. 
must be applied before crops are plant- 
ed. Moreover, the ground must be just 



right — not too hard, not too soft. All 
kinds of weather conditions can affect 
both planting time and soil condition. 
Therefore, Shell, its field reps, and its 
agency. J. Walter Thompson, must be 
on the ball to catch the farmer with 
radio commercials at the proper time. 
Item: A Shell insecticide was ap- 
proved by the U. S. Department ol 
Agriculture for a certain crop in a 
certain area last spring. It was too 
late to apply the insecticide by the 



case history 



usual method and special instructions 
for the farmer were necessary. The 
fastest way to get these instructions to 
him was by radio. 

Shell ( ihemical i> belie\ ed to be the 
biggest user of radio in the farm in- 
secticide industry. (For the story of 
how farm radio sells consumer goods, 
jee "How to get the most out of farm 
radio and TV." SPONSOR, 29 Decem- 
ber 1952.) Those familiar with the 
farm insecticide industry say that one 
hi" reason for Shell Chemical's com- 



Sudden plagues, $ 
demand. Spot rail 



parativel) intensive use of radio is that 
the firm is set up to use it. Shell 
Chemical's trained field reps are gen- 
erously sprinkled all over the U.S. and 
they report daily to Shell distribution 
centers on weather and pest conditions. 
Shell headquarters in New York City 
have direct lines to a half dozen major 
distribution centers spotted strategical- 
ly over the country. 

Shell's advertising manager, Merton 
Keel, explained how radio is brought 
into play in an emergency. "Let's sup- 
pose." he told sponsor, "there is a 
sudden grasshopper infestation in Wy- 
oming. A field rep will phone as soon 
as there is evidence of a need for in- 
secticide. He will relay to us in New 
York what areas are affected and what 
towns are nearby. We tell the agency, 
and while the commercials are being 
written, the timebuyer is choosing the 
best radio stations. 

"We can have copy on the air 48 
hours after a call for help from our 
field reps. There's no other ad medi- 
um that will do a job for us as fast 
as that." 

Keel explains even farm newspapers 
are limited in value when it comes to 



Shell's D-D is relatively expensive so commercials urge farmer 
to treat varl ol soil, then compare it u>ith the untreated portion. 



Commercials are specific, give dollars-and-cents savings, names of 
farmers who use product. Photo below shows celery farm in Florida 







36 



SPONSOR 



edium when 

ither affect insecticide 

i 
iliilii> is the answer 



an emergency. Practically all of them 
are weeklies, semi-monthlies, or month- 
lies, he pointed out, and even when it 
comes to a daily newspaper it takes 
time to lay out an ad and have the 
plates made. 

"We like radio for its economy, too,"' 
Keel said. "Actually we spend less than 
10% of our ad budget on radio, but 
don't forget farm radio is pretty cheap. 
We can buy two spots a day on a sta- 
tion for as little as $8 or $10. That 
means $100 or less for a two-week 
campaign." 

What is Shell Chemical? Farming 
may be the oldest industry in the world 
but Shell Chemical is part of one of 
the newest and fastest-growing indus- 
tries — making chemicals from petro- 
leum. As is indicated by its name, 
Shell Chemical is the petro-chemical 
arm of the Shell Oil Co. Its ranking 
in the industry is a hard fact to pin 
down. Not only are farm insecticide 
firms as secretive as the big soap and 
tobacco outfits, but the industry doesn't 
always agree on what is a petro-chemi- 
cal and what isn't. 

However, most trade sources put 
Shell Chemical second only to the giant 
Union Carbide & Carbon Corp. so far 
as sales of chemicals from petroleum 
go. So far as petro-chemicals for agri- 
culture go, although only 20% of Shell 
Chemical's output goes to farmers, it is 
second to none, these sources say. 

Shell Chemical confines its radio ad- 
vertising to four agricultural chemi- 
cals: Aldrin. Dieldrin. D-D. and am- 
monia. The first two are new synthet- 
ic insecticides, Aldrin having been 
commercially available for only three 
years, Dieldrin (a similar compound) 
for two. They were synthesized by 
Julius Hyman & Co., now a subsidiary 
of Shell Chemical. 

The creation of these two new mole- 
cules was quite an accomplishment and 
is further evidence I if any is needed) 

26 JANUARY 1953 




Katlio races insects 



Shell's advertising must cope with 

sudden plagues of insects, such as 

grasshoppers, which are active in the states indicated above. 

Shell finds farm print media too slow to reach farmer in 

time to take offensive against insects and beat out competitors. With radio Shell 

can have copy on air 48 hours after a call for help from one of many field reps 



of the important part played by the 
organic chemist in digging up sales op- 
portunities for American business. You 
can get some idea of Dieldrin's com- 
plexity from its chemical name — 1,2,- 
3,4,10,10-hexachloro-6,7,-epoxy-l,4,4a,- 
5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-l,4,5,8-dimethano- 
naphthalene. It differs from Aldrin 
only by virtue of having a single oxy- 
gen atom but this additional atom 
keeps its insect-killing power high in 
hot climates. 

D-D is a soil fumigant injected in 



the soil in much the same manner as a 
serum is injected into a human being 
with a needle. It is used for killing 
sub-soil microscopic pests. Since these 
enemies of the farmer can't be seen, 
their menace has not been fully appre- 
ciated until recent years, but many sci- 
entists believe that underground plant 
enemies equal, if not exceed, the bet- 
ter-known above-ground pests in their 
effect on crops. D-D lias been around 
since before World War II. 

i Please turn to page 88) 



illl!!llll!IIU!lll!ll!lllllll!lll!!lllilllllllll!llllllllllllilll!lllllll!!l!ll!l!llllllllllli:!iy 



Why Shell neetls spttt ratlin's flexibility 

Pests attack: at different times: One group of cotton pests, for 
example, may be active in early spring, another in late spring, a third 
in summer. Advertising must be timed with ecu h group's appearance 



Planting times vary: Shell's soil fumigant, D-D, has to be used 
well before crop is planted and soil must be in proper condition. Sini e 
weather affects both these factors, ad medium has to pinpoint its messages 



U. S. must approre in.vet*(ic'icft>s: Sudden Dept. of Agriculture 

okay of Shell's insecticide. Aldrin. made it too late in year to apply- 
in usual manner. Quick radio messages gave farmer special instructions 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



37 




PERSONALITIES ARE HEART OF FOREIGN-LANGUAGE RADIO. L. TO R., ALDO ALDI SELLS C-K WINE ON WOV. CHESTER JAKOSKI VISITS STORE TO PUSHi 

Foreip-lanpage radio: 1953 

National advertisers are pouring* more money into it with business 
particularly good in Texas. One big need: more researeh faets 



J_ he big news in the foreign-lan- 
guage radio field these days is that 
national advertisers are pouring more 
money into it. 

Once considered a high-cost, spe- 
cialized medium for small firms with 
narrow market appeal, foreign-lan- 
guage radio is now going after the big 
boys with confidence in its manner and 
more data in its pocket. 

This new interest in foreign-lan- 
guage groups is partly due to the more 
intensive concentration by national ad- 
vertisers on individual markets. But it 
can also be explained by a growing, 
uncomfortable feeling among some 
large firms that they may be missing 
a good bet. 

In other word-, t In \ are |ia\ ing 
more heed to what foreign-language 
stations have been saying until they 
are hoarse — thai through foreign-lan- 
guage radio advertisers can reach a 
market group that cannot be reached 
effective].) in any other way. 

I nlil the past few years, if used at 
all. foreign-language radio was tucked 
away in some obscure corner of the 
hig national advertising budgets. Re- 
cently, as sounds of surcc-s have been 
emitted from that corner, national ad- 
vertisers have been — quietly, for the 



most part — buying time in various for- 
eign-language markets and watching 
results like hawks. The big question 
in some quarters is still not whether 
the 400 foreign-language radio stations 
can sell goods but whether they can 
do a substantial selling job that Eng- 
lish radio can't do. 

To get a line on what has been hap- 
pening in foreign-language radio SPON- 
SOR has queried a cross-section of sta- 
tions and advertisers. It presents here 
a 1953 status report — a look at what 



status report 



is happening in the foreign-language 
radio field as well as a survey of what 
advertisers have learned about selling 
goods by talking to people in their 
native tongue. 

Here are the highlights of foreign- 
language radio trends: 

1- The billings trend varies greatly 
but business is generally good among 
foreign-language stations and has been 
getting better in many areas. In south- 
ern Texas, where something of a for- 
eign-language radio boom i^ going on. 
some of the increases in national bill- 



ings have been close to spectacular. 

2. National advertisers are going in- 
to foreign-language radio in greater 
numbers. Some are jumping in with 
both feet, others are just getting their 
toes wet. Again, it is southern Texas 
where the national advertising trend is 
most marked. 

3. The foreign-language stations are 
growing up. are offering more sophis- 
ticated promotion material, more in the 
way of reliable and useful market data. 
Blue sky selling is passe. There are 
still plenty of blank spots in the re- 
search picture. Procter & Gamble, one 
of the most active national advertisers 
in Spanish Texas, for example, is spon- 
soring its own survey together with 
Young & Rubicam to dig up some 
breakdowns of listening in Spanish 
versus English, something which has 
not been available up to this time. It 
is understood other advertisers are also 
trying to measure the Spanish Texas 
potential in exact terms. 

4. TV has had little effect on for- 
eign-language listening. Manv of the 
stations are on only during the dav. 
Some s'ation spokesmen feel that TV 
has helped foreign-language radio by 
chopping uu radio markets and mak- 
ing advertisers more conscious of ra- 



38 



SPONSOR 




OD. CARMINA PROMOTES JAX BEER FOR KCOR 



dio's audience segments and compo- 
nent markets. Foreign-language TV is 
still a small factor. 

5. The frequent predictions of the 
decline of foreign-language radio are 
not panning out. Immigration after 
the war added a substantial chunk of 
listeners to foreign-language stations 
and the Spanish population in the 
southwest U. S. is growing fast. The 
McCarran-Walter Act. which went in- 
to effect Christmas Eve 1952, has laid 
down stricter requirements before an 
emigrant can be granted a visa to this 
country but the actual immigration 
quotas differ little from the previous 
law regulating immigration. 

6- National advertisers and their 
agencies are, naturally, acquiring sav- 
vy on how to sell the foreign-language 
market by radio. They still lean on 
foreign-language stations and market- 
ing specialists for detailed know-how. 
One possible reason why : A big New 
York agency transcribed its own for- 
eign-language commercial and includ- 
ed a word that had a double-meaning. 
Luckily, it was caught in time. While 
advertisers are finding out that peo- 
ple are basically the same no matter 
what language they speak, the minor 
differences and nuances in advertising 
can spell the difference between sales 
increase and sales slump. Dialects are 
also a problem service-conscious sta- 
tions are only too happy to tell adver- 
tisers about. 

Boom on the Rio Grande: The big 

development in foreign-language radio 
is the advertisers' march to the Rio 
Grande. Advertisers are becoming 
aware not only that there are about 
1,400,000 Latin-Americans living in 



Texas but that in 34 Texas counties 
they constitute more than half the pop- 
ulation. 

To these figures can be added the 
150,000 to 200,000 Mexican legal mi- 
gratory workers who enter Texas every 
year under international agreement 
(they are in the U.S. up to six months'! 
and the unknown number of illegal 
"wetback" immigrants who cross the 
Rio Grande behind the back of the 
border patrol. 

The strong interest in the Rio Grande 
Valley by U.S. advertisers has been 
recognized since September of last year 
by the SRDS listing of Mexican border 
stations. These stations have transmit- 
ters in Mexico but — significantly — 
sales offices in the U.S. The stations 
are XEO. Matamoras - Brownsville: 
XEOR, Reynosa-McAllen : XEMU, Pie- 
dras Negras-Eagle Pass: XEJ. Ciudad 
Juarez-El Paso, and XEAS, Nuevo La- 
redo-Laredo. 

Robert N. Pinkerton. who heads up 
XEO and XEOR, points out that in 
the lower Rio Grande area Mexicans 
pour across the international bridges 



at the rate of 1,000,000 a month to 
shop in the U.S. These shoppers, says 
Pinkerton, display no fixed pattern of 
buying. They buy according to price, 
hearsay, and the looks of the package, 
"but most of all from hearing the 
brand name mentioned on the radio." 

The biggest Spanish-American con- 
centration is in Bexar County (San 
Antonio I where about 250,000 live. 
More than half of San Antonio's public 
school children are Spanish-speaking. 
Two Spanish stations in San Antonio. 
KCOR and KIWW, are especially ac- 
tive in selling this market to national 
advertisers. 

The high proportion of Spanish- 
speaking people in some areas of Texas 
sheds some questions on whether they 
can any longer be considered "for- 
eign." Some counties have more than 
90% of their population of Mexican 
birth and ancestry. The over-all pro- 
portion of Spanish- to English-speak- 
ing people has been going up steadily 
-from 13% in 1920 to 22% in 1948. 

The argument that only Spanish ra- 
dio can effectively reach these people 



26 JANUARY 1953 



Today's top trends in foreign-language radio 

1. National advertisers are getting more interested as feeling 
grows they may be missing a good bet. Some sponsors are 
jumping in with both feet, others are just getting their toes wet 



2. Business shows uptrend in many areas. Stations in the 
Rio Grande Valley, where there is a heavy concentration of 
Spanish-speaking people, are enjoying something like a boom 

3. More reliable market data becoming available as stations 
can afford it and find national advertisers demand it. Some 
sponsors are trying to fill in blank spots in the research picture 

1. TV has had little effect on foreign-language listening and 
has even helped it by changing radio listening habits, making 
advertisers more and more conscious of the individual markets 

5. More savvy is being acquired in selling. Advertisers are 
learning that while basic ad principles apply, the minor dif- 
ferences from the English ad approach can affect sales greatly 

6. Predictions of decline in foreign-language radio are not 
panning out. Postwar immigration, Spanish population rises 
in Texas have added to the market. Bi-lingual selling is up 



illUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

39 




Beer firms hi c especially <i< live in German 

language programing. Schaefer poster lies 
WWRL show in with over-all ad campaign 




Foreign-language radio gires listener link 
with own culture. XEO marimba group nluys 
in Brownsville street during "Charro Days" 



is bolstered by figures reported to 
SFOiNSOR on increased spending in 
Spanish radio by national advertisers. 
Richard O'Connell, New York City rep 
of KCOR (as well as assistant manager 
of that station ) . reports that national 
business during the first half of 1952 
doubled over the previous six months 
and then doubled again during the sec- 
ond half of 1952. National Time Sales, 
which represents a dozen Spanish sta- 
tions in the southwest U.S. (including 
the border stations ) , said that na- 
tional billings have gone up fourfold 
in the 18 months beginning in Julv 
1951. 

There are some other important 
Spanish- American areas beside Texas. 
New York City, where there has been 
a large Puerto Rican influx in recent 
\ears I there being no immigration bars 
to U.S. territorial citizens), now has 
between 400.000 and 500.000 Span- 
ish-speaking residents, according to 
most estimates. Station WWRL. New 
York, estimates, on the basis of the 
U.S. census, a Columbia University 
study, and other sources, that nearly 
1.000.000 Spanish-speaking persons 
live in the New York Citv metropoli- 
tan area. WHOM. New York, has in- 
creased its Spanish programing from 
13 hours weekly in 1950 to 31 hours in 
1952. 

Los Angeles is also a bis Spanish- 
speaking center with estimates ranging 
up to 550.000 for the southern Califor- 
nia area. New Mexico ard Arizona 



contain substantial numbers of Span- 
ish-Americans. Borden has been suc- 
cessfully using KIFN, Phoenix, for 
more than two years with a 15-minute 
program across the board. In the San 
Francisco Bay area, KLOK. San Jose, 
and KSAN. San Francisco, have a po- 
tential audience estimated as high as 
135,000. KDZA, Pueblo, can broad- 
cast to 63,000 Spanish-speaking people. 

Big as the Spanish market is, it's 
only a part of the big foreign-language 
market. There were more than 10 
million foreign-born whites in the U.S., 
according to the 1950 Census. No one 
knows exactly how many second and 
third generation descendants should be 
added to this figure (unlike the 1940 
Census, the 1950 Census did not in- 
clude a question on what mother 
tongue was spoken in the home I . but 
various estimates and studies by uni- 
versities, radio stations, welfare groups 
have been made. With a few excep- 
tions, foreign-language groups have 
concentrated in large urban areas. 
making them easier to count - - and 
making them more accessible to the 
advertiser. 

New York City is the biggest single 
market for foreign-language advertis- 
ing. In its borders are 75 nationalities. 
The biggest groups, aside from Puerto 
Ricans, are: Jewish. 2.500.000; Ital- 
ian, 2.100.000; German. 429.000; Po- 
lish. 412.000. There are also healthv 
representations from Eastern Europe. 
( Please turn to page 70) 



ll'llllilllllllll!! Iiillllllllilll!illllinil!l!lllillllllll!l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll» '1li:j<li:illhll|!l!![|llll'illlllll[i||||l||IP!lllll![!i<l||!||||[ll|]ll|l|lirill!''!ll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI |l||||lilllllll!llllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIg 

Here are but a few of foreign-language radio's success stories 

► Mueller Macaroni do.: In jace of intrenched competition oj leading Italian brands, Mueller 
launched campaign on WO) with eight iS-second announcements daily in Italian, two a day in Eng- 
lish. After 13 weeks, advertiser made one-week premium offer test. Results: total of 8.166 responses 

► Borden do.: To sell evaporated milk, Borden used soap opera entitled "Mad re Consejara" on 
KCOR. San Antonio sales volume increased 300' i in 39 weeks — all the increase being in Latin areas. 
Firm's distribution in Latin area outlets went from 40' < to nearly 100', . Borden show in second year 

► Electric fans: Pittsburgh store. SiegeUs Jewelers, ran one $8.50 announcement during a summer 
evening on W HOD Polish program advertising fans for $17.50. By 10 a.m. the next morning entire 
stock of 17 fans teas sold out for a total of $297.50. The store did not use any oilier advertising 

► Colgate-Palmolive-Peet: Pushing detergents among Spanish-Americans in Austin, firm started 
off with small schedule for Fab on KTXN. Then doubled schedule, added I el. District C-C-P sales 
manager told station the sales increases were particularly noticeable in the Latin-American areas 



u in "iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iii mil ii 

40 



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SPONSOR 




sales... sales... 



sales . . . sales 



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CSX) 



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For full information on how you can put 
Associated Press news to work for you and your sponsors, 
contact your AP Field Representative or write 



undreds of the country's finest stations announce with pride 

'THIS STATION IS A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS." 





Great reception 

for your advertising 
every day in the week in the 
"Big 3" TV Magazine Group! 



TV FORECAST 
in CHICAGO, ILL 

185 N. Wabash Ave. 



Sells more people . . . with 
more money to spend . . . 
3,000,000* readers each week 




■^ff- 




TV DIGEST 



in PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

333 S. Broad St. 



Here's why the brand you advertise, is assured 
of a great sales reception in New York's 
TV Guide, Chicago's TV Forecast, and \ 

Philadelphia's TV Digest: 

1. Based on ABC circulation figures, each 
of the "Big 3" TV Magazine Group is the 
# 1 metropolitan magazine in its respective 
city — delivering more families than 
any other local magazine. 

2. Their ABC circulation statements show that each magazine 
outsells every national weekly on newsstands! (In New York only, 
exceeded by Life and the Saturday Evening Post). 

3. Never before have advertisers been offered such dominant coverage, 
selling the cream of the buying public — at the amazingly low cost 
of $2.59 per thousand. Furthermore, the constant daily use of these magazines, 
by the entire family, gives your advertising visibility for seven full days 
and nights. The "Big 3" TV Magazine Group may be bought as a 
unit with a special discount, or individually. For further details, write or phone 
any of the "Big 3" TV Magazine Group. 

•Based on ABC Publisher's statements - TOTAL NET PAID JANUARY-JUNE 1952 - 733,359 

(TV Guide 379,134; TV Forecast 198,180; TV Digest 156,045.) current issues total approximately 875,000. 



Some of the many famous 
NATIONAL ADVERTIS- 
ERS who use the "Big 3" 
TV Magazine Group to build 
bigger TV audiences. 
Admiral Corporation • The 
American Tobacco Company • 
Bendix Home Appliances • The 
Borden Company • Bristol- 
Myers Company • Celanese 
Corporation of America • E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours & Com- 
pany • General Electric Com- 
pany • General Foods Company 
• Johnson 81 Johnson • The 
Magnavox Company • Nash 
Motors * Procter &. Gamble 
Company • Radio Corporation 
of America • The Texas Com- 
pany • U. S. Tobacco Com- 
pany • Westinghouse Electric 
Corporation. 



42 



SPONSOR 



iiiiii'.x 




seeonti tttili\ vaL H 



JULY TO 

DECEMBER 

l 9 5 2 

Issued every six months 



Advertising Agencies 

Adrian Samish, Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, profile 14 July p. 34 

Chester MacCracken, DCSS, profile 28 July p. 50 

Emil Reinhardt, Emil Reinhardt Adv., profile... 11 Aug. p. 50 

Philip H. Cohen, SSCB, profile 25 Aug. p. 52 

James C. Douglass, Erwin, Wasey & Co., profile... 8 Sep. p. 56 

Paul Louis, D'Arcy Adv., profile 22 Sep. p. 54 

Harold L. McClinton, Calkins & Holden, Carlock, 

McClinton & Smith, profile 6 Oct. p. 76 

Do your agency's presentations put you to sleep? 20 Oct. p. 38 

B. B. Geyer, Geyer Adv., profile 20 Oct. p. 54 

Jack Upton, N. W. Ayer & Sons, profile 3 Nov. p. 52 

Anderson F. Hewitt, Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & 

Mather, profile 17 Nov. p. 49 

Philip L. McHugh, Tracy Locke Co., profile 1 Dec. p. 48 

Harry Trenner, William H. Weintraub Co., profile 15 Dec. p. 51 

Leo Burnett, Leo Burnett Co., profile 29 Dec. p. 68 

Automotive and Lubricants 

Battle of the seat covers: Rayco's push helps 

other firms 15 Dec. p. 33 

Why Phillips Petroleum stresses spot radio-TV.... 15 Dec. p. 38 



Broadcast Advertising Problems and 
Developments 

Economic outlook for fall 1952 

Price trend in network radio shows 

Spot radio: fall 1952 outlook 

Regional networks: status and outlook 

Transit radio: status and outlook 

FM radio: status and outlook 

Storecasting, status, costs, results 

Unions: problems and outlook 

Sports on radio/TV : status and outlook 

Advertisers learned from political conventions 

Negro radio section: figures, programs, results.... 
Forum: Why should advertisers plan special cam- 
paigns geared to the Negro market? 

Advertising Council: ad industry good Samaritan 

Regional radio networks, 1952 (special section) : 

Advantages for sponsors, rates, programing, 

results, merchandising 

Forum: Can seasonal products be sold on air all 

year? .... 

What air media did to swing the vote 

Why is radio the agenda stepchild? 

Will single-rate structure sell nighttime radio?.... 



14 July 


P- 


40 


14 July 


P- 


54 


14 July 


P- 


65 


14 July 


P- 


82 


14 July 


P- 


91 


14 July 


P- 


92 


14 July 


P- 


93 


14 July 


P- 


216 


14 July 


P- 


221 


28 July 


P- 


24 


28 July 


P- 


29 


28 July 


P- 


42 


11 Aug. 


P- 


32 



6 Oct. p. 43 



6 Oct. 

3 Nov. 
17 Nov. 
29 Dec. 



66 
25 
38 
19 



Commercials and Sales Aids 



Ten ways to poison your salesmen's attitude to- 
wards air advertising 

Forum: Can live and film sequences be mixed ad- 
vantageously in TV commercials? 



8 Sep. p. 34 



What a TV artist should know: Foreman 

How to sell in 10 TV seconds 

Functions of a TV artist: Foreman 

Puppets of famous talent sell for Benrus 

Live, personalized 10-second TV pitches on WNBQ 
Schwerin basics for TV commercial effectiveness . 
WNMP uses irritation copy to prove value of 

soft-sell 

Forum: Uniform TV standards for cards and 
slides tying a national advertiser's TV an- 
nouncements to local retailers 

Elmer Wheeler sales principles can aid air pitch . 
Forum: How long should the same demonstration 
commercial be repeated on a network TV 
program? 

Confections 

Wrigley's 25 years in radio: part I 

Wrigley's 25 years in radio: part II 

Mars attributes top place in field to radio/TV .. 



8 Sep. 
6 Oct. 

20 Oct. 
20 Oct. 

3 Nov. 
17 Nov. 
17 Nov. 

17 Nov. 



17 Nov. 
1 Dec. 



p. 48 

p. 70 

p. 34 

p. 50 

p. 54 

p. 26 

p. 40 

p. 42 



p. 58 
p. 64 



15 Dec. p. 52 



17 Nov. p. 29 

1 Dec. p. 26 

15 Dec. p. 30 



Contests and Offers 

Minute Maid kid premium hypos lemonade sales 
Forum: How do you determine the success of a 
radio or TV premium offer? 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Toni Co.'s radio and TV lineup 

What spot did for Old Spice shave lotion 

Bayer thrives on low cost-per- 1,000 
Coty launches a face powder in New York 
Rapidol hair tint wins shelf space using spot TV 
William Hausberg, Lehn & Fink, profile 

Farnt Radio 

Farm radio and TV section: Latest data on U.S. 
farm market; tips to advertisers; behind- 
scenes tour of rural broadcasting; results 
from use of farm radio-TV _ 

Foods and Beverages 

John M. Fox, Minute Maid Corp., profile 

Henry Gorski, P. Ballantine & Sons, profile 

Hamm Brewing triples sales with TV, merchan- 
dising - 

How Pepsi bounced back 

Abe Kanner, Globe Bottling Co., profile 

Are food retailers neglecting radio-TV co-op? 

Florida Citrus ups fruit demand via spot radio/TV 

TV ups Nehi Bottling sales 200% in one year 

Robert C. Palmer, Flako Products Corp., profile 

How Ruppert wooed the women and won ... 

Kingan gets results by merchandising Godfrey 

radio show 

W. R. Harman, American Maize Products, profile 

Canada Dry changes TV approach 

Gerber reaches the young mother via network TV 

Foreign Radio 

Foreign language radio: basic facts _ 

Forum: Where can advertisers get information 
on how to get most out of Canadian radio?.— 

Selling in Canada: special section 

Canadian market: raw materials spur boom ... 
Canadian radio: advantages to American 

sponsor ._. - — 

List of Canadian radio stations and reps ..— 

Tips on selling to English-speaking Canada .... 

Tips on selling to French-speaking Canada 

How leading sponsors use Canadian radio 

Advertisers and agencies active in Canadian 

radio 

Canadian TV: status and outlook 

insurance and Finance 

Stocks on the air _ 

Citizen's Mutual ups sales 400% with radio .... .. 

Mutual of Omaha spends 65% of budget on 
radio/TV 



8 Sep. 


P- 


44 


3 Nov. 


P- 


44 


14 July 


P- 


16 


6 Oct. 


P- 


40 


3 Nov. 


P- 


28 


3 Nov. 


P- 


32 


17 Nov. 


P- 


36 


29 Dec. 


P- 


14 



29 Dec. p. 27 



11 Aug. 


P- 


14 


25 Aug. 


P- 


20 


25 Aug. 


P- 


50 


8 Sep. 


P- 


25 


22 Sep. 


P- 


16 


22 Sep. 


P- 


30 


6 Oct. 


P- 


32 


6 Oct. 


P- 


35 


20 Oct. 


P- 


18 


20 Oct. 


P- 


32 


20 Oct. 


P- 


36 


3 Nov. 


P- 


18 


29 Dec. 


P- 


16 


29 Dec. 


P- 


24 



14 July p. 85 



11 Aug. 
11 Aug. 
11 Aug. 



28 July 

8 Sep. 



Merchandising and Promotion 

Station merchandising outlook for fall L952 14 July 

WFAA's Anniversary "Fair" boosts advertisers 28 July 

Kingan gets results by merchandising Godfrey 

radio show 20 Oct. 

Five ways to promote your TV program 20 Oct. 

NBC uses Hollywood techniques to promote shows 1 Dec. 

The merchandising problem (special section): 
need for evaluation; admen's reactions to 
merchandising; examples of radio station 
merchandising; recommendations for improv- 
ing merchandising procedure 1 Dec. 

TV program guide magazines prove to be good 

show promotion vehicles — 15 Dec. 



44 
61 
62 



11 Aug. p. 66 

11 Aug. p. 74 

11 Aug. p. 76 

11 Aug. p. 78 

11 Aug. p. 89 

11 Aug. p. 82 

11 Aug. p. 88 



22 
40 



I Dec. p. 30 



70 
26 

36 

40 
18 



26 JANUARY 1953 



(Continued on next page) 



33 

22 

43 



Miscellaneous Products and Services 

Norman P. Hutson, Frank Fleer Corp., profile 28 July p. 14 

Oakland, Cal., sells its industrial plusses via T\ 28julv p. 52 

Revere Copper & Brass: $1,000,000 TV sponsoi 11 Aug. p. 27 

Schick straightens sales curve with TV 25 Aug. p. 28 

Martin Michel, 20th Century-Fox, profile 8 Sep. p. 22 

\l<>\ies on the air 8 Sep. p. 38 

How T\ pul "\er a coffee-vending machine 22 Sep. p. 32 

Griffin launches new product via network TV 20 Oct. p. 22 

Jonnj Mop, "ticklish" product, goes over on TV 3 Nov. p. 22 

Emanuel Kai/. Doe-kin Products, profile 17 Nov. p. 16 

T\ helps movies score box office successes ... 29 Dec. p. 16 

Programing, General 

Programing trends in network radio: fall 1952 . 14 July p. 50 
Available network package programs, radio 

(chart) _ 14 J uly p. 56 

Programing trends in spot radio 14 July p. 74 

Top radio programs in Canada (charts) 11 Aug. p. 70 

How to get the most out of a kid show 25 Aug. p. 32 

Six tips to women d.j.'s 25 Aug. p. 35 

Net radio clients want performance-proved shows 22 Sep. p. 26 

Sponsored network radio shows with costs (chart) 22 Sep. p. 28 

FM classical music audience fiercely loyal 22 Sep. p. 52 
Is same show on radio/TV future programing 

pattern? 6 Oct. p. 29 

Regional radio network programing 6 Oct. p. 52 

Tips on handling kids and animals in your show 3 Nov. p. 30 
What sponsors should know about early a.m. 

radio time 3 Nov. p. 38 

The five-minute network radio show 17 Nov. p. 34 

Drama shows far outnumber other types on 

AM/TV 17 Nov. p. 60 

Net "tandem" plans offer low-cost circulation 15 Dec. p. 34 

More radio stations programing all-night shows 29 Dec. p. 66 

Programing. Television 

Time allotted to TV programs by type (chart) 14 July p. 30 

Available network package programs, TV (chart) 14July p. 149 

.Spot TV programing trends 14 July p. 162 

Success of situation comedies on TV: Foreman 28 July p. 46 

Is programing subsidy era over in network TV? 8 Sep. p. 28 

Sponsored TV network shows with costs (chart) 8 Sep. p. 30 

Advantages of alternate-week TV sponsorship 8 Sep. p. 36 

How Death I alley Days made the switch to TV 3 Nov. p. 34 

TV soap opera on a shoestring budget 17 Nov. p. 33 

Have sponsors stopped taking program risks in 

TV? IDec. p. 23 

Forum: Does recorded audience laughter add to 

viewer enjoyment of a filmed TV situation 

comedy show? 1 Dec. p. 58 

Westerns, adventure-mysteries lead in spot TV 

film ratings 29 Dec. p. 22 

TV stations show feature films in movie-house 

fashion 29 Dec. p. 66 

Public Utilities 

N. Y. Central Railroad summer campaign 14 July p. 16 

William T. Faricy, Ass'n of American Railroads, 

profile 6 Oct. p. 22 



Research 

Radio Basics: a charted compendium of statistical 
information about radio, its circulation, audi- 
ence, programs, costs, billings 

Television Basics: tables and charts setting forth 
basic data on TV's dimensions, audience, 

viewing habits, ratings, costs 

Research: status, trends, firms and services 
Radio, TV research techniques and weaknesses 
International Basics: facts and figures on radio 

and TV abroad 

Distribution of TV set ownership: April 1952 ... 
Mow in take advantage of auto radio listening 
NBC "Radio Hofstra": net radio still potent sales 

force . _ 
Postcard program research, simple, low cost 
Vuto radio listening: Vdvertest study in N. Y. C. 
Two new coverage took: Standard Audit & Mea- 
surement and Nielsen Coverage Service 
(SAM and NCS) 
Radio'- nighttime audience: CPN study 



14 July p. 99 



14 July p. 169 

14 July p. 206 

14 July p. 206 

14 July p. 227 

11 Aug. p. 52 

25 Aug. p. 18 

25 Vug. p. 30 

25 Aug. p. 38 

8 Sep. p. 58 



Whan studies: data on radio/TV in New England 

and Midwest 20 Oct. 

Baseball viewing/listening among women: Adver- 

test . 3 Nov. 

Schwerin basics for TV commercial effectiveness 17 Nov. 

CBS Radio Spot Sales builds sales with research 1 Dec. 

Average radio station's circulation up despite TV: 

Nielsen __ 15 Dec. 



Retail 

Food retailers neglecting radio/TV co-op 22 Sep. 

WWCA campaign helps retailers revive business 20 Oct. 



p. 25 



p- 


56 


p- 


40 


p- 


29 



p. 25 



30 
56 



Soaps and Cleansers 

Radio/TV help Oakite meet shelf competition 25 Aug. p. 36 

How Fab rose from 11th place to No. 2 in field . 22 Sep. p. 23 
Pacific Coast Borax launches Death Valley Days 

on TV 3 Nov. p. 34 

Television 

Network TV: circulation, costs, availabilities, 
program trends, technical developments, 
UHF ....... 14 July p. 131 



Spot TV: availabilities, rates, standardization, 
program trends, business outlook, top agen- 
cies, clients 

Theatre and fee TV: status and outlook 

What does it cost to build a TV station? 

TV's cost-cutting gadgets help solve production 
problems 

Will SAG demands drive small clients out of TV? 

Is daytime TV overpriced? 

Is spot TV's new standard contract flexible 
enough? ... _ 

New era in TV operations: CBS and NBC in 
Hollywood .... 

Television Film 

Should TV film programs be rerun: Foreman 

Film programing trends, spot TV 

Tv' film: trends, problems, outlook 

TV film programs available (chart) 

Producers, Tv films and commercials (charts).... 

Syndicators, TV film programs (chart) 

Is the rush to film shows economically sound?.... 
APS sets up film library service for TV stations 
Tips to agencymen signing a film program con- 
tract 

Westerns, adventure-mysteries lead in spot TV 
film ratings 

Time Buying 

Rate cut status in network radio 

Spot radio rate outlook, fall 1952 

Cost trends, network TV _. 

Cost trends, spot TV 

How TV is changing media buying patterns 

Is the all-media buyer best for sponsors? 

TV timebuyer of the future: Foreman 

Fall trends in spot radio/TV buying 

Will spot radio rates be cut? 

Forum: Can spot radio alone be an effective 
advertising instrument for a national adver- 
tiser? 

Is daytime TV overpriced? 

Forum: What is the basic formula for a time- 
buyer to use in determining station selection? 
Early morning radio time: low-cost, resultful 
Network radio "tandem" plans offer low-cost 
circulation 



Tobacco 

Harry P. Wurman, Bayuk Cigars, profile 
Carl V. Schuchard, Benson & Hedges, profile 
Harry Chesley, Philip Morris & Co., profile 



14 July p. 155 

14 July p. 214 
11 Aug. p. 34 

22 Sep. p. 36 

6 Oct. p. 38 

20 Oct. p. 30 

3 Nov. p. 37 

15 Dec. p. 36 



14Ji.lv 


P- 


24 


14 July 


P- 


164 


14 July 


P- 


186 


14 July 


P- 


189 


14 July 


P- 


193 


14 July 


P- 


196 


28 July 


P- 


19 


11 Aug. 


P- 


46 



15 Dec. p. 28 
29 Dec. p. 22 



14Julv 


P- 


44 


14 July 


P- 


67 


14 July 


p. 


132 


14Julv 


p. 


156 


11 Aug. 


P- 


30 


25 Aug. 


P- 


25 


25 Aug. 


P- 


46 


8 Sep. 


p. 


32 


22 Sep. 


P- 


38 


22 Sep. 


P- 


44 


20 Oct. 


P- 


30 


20 Oct. 


P- 


46 


3 Nov. 


p. 


38 



15 Dec. p. 34 



14 July 


p. 14 


1 Dec. 


p. 16 


15 Dec. 


P. 12 



Transcriptions 



22 Sep. 
6 Oct. 



p 34 
p. 36 



Transcribed programs, trends. 
Library services; status and o 



ts, out! 


»ok 


11 July 


p. 76 


.ok 




14 July 


p. 80 



BINDERS accommodating a six-month supply of issues, $4.00 each; two tor $7.00 
BOUND VOLUMES (two volumes) per year, $15.00 




IS 














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Represented by Headley-Reed Company 



26 JANUARY 1953 



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Boom or bust . . . it's all in the way you plot the spots. And 

it's a story with a happy ending every time you use the television 

stations represented by NBC Spot Sales. 

These stations take a personal interest in making your spot TV 

advertising a sales success. Their merchandising activity, for instance, 

has paid off for advertisers in nine leading markets. Direct 

mail . . . point-of-sale displays . . . on-the-air and newspaper promotions 

. . . calls on key outlets by local TV personalities ... all these 

and more help sales curves climb. 

By every measure, spot TV advertising is your best media value 
today. Just call your NBC Spot Salesman now and you'll be all smiles 
when you plot the spots on your next sales chart. 



SPOT SALES 

SO Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Chicago Cleveland Washington San Francisco 

Los Angeles Charlotte* Atlanta* 'Bomar Lowranca Associates 



TELEVISION STATIONS: 


t^\ W«GB 


Srlienectady- 


IrsBcl 


Albany-Tro-u 


\^^/ WNBT 


New York 


WNBQ 


Chicago 


KNBH 


Los Angeles 


WPTZ 


Philadelphia 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


WNBK 


Cleveland 


WWW 


Washington 


KPTV 


Portland, Ore. 


representing 




RADIO STATIONS: 


^TW "NBC 


San Francisco 


fill WTA " 


Cleveland 


^^]W wc 


Washington 


WNBC 


New York 


WMAQ 


Chicago 



AUTOMOBILES 



SPONSOR: C. Stanlee Martin Oldsmobile; AGENCY: Fennel] 
Brink's Oldsmobile Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: These two automobile firms 
minted to stimulate lagging Sunday sales. They decided 
to co-sponsor a live late-at-night show on Saturday, se- 
lected Peter Potter's Juke Box Jury on KNXT. This 
show runs from 10:30 p.m. to midnight: the auto firms 
bankroll the 11 :00 to 11:30 p.m. segment. Not only did 
Sunday sides skyrocket, according to the station, but the 
over-all sales for both companies more than doubled since 
they began using the program. Cost: $750 per week. 



KNXT, Los Angeles 



PROGRAM: Juke Box J»ry 



STRAWBXRR! 



KPRC-TV, Houston 



PROGRAM : Announcement 



TH/IMj&SI» 



SPONSOR: Own-A-Home Trailer Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Early in the summer, this 
company launched a schedule of participating announce- 
ments on Take A Break, informal program staged each 
weekday <>n WOC-TV's lawn. The first pitch demonstrat- 
ed a $5,500 trailer, which was promptly sold as a result. 
Iftei three announcements, two trailers had been sold. 
After eight announcements, a total of four trailers had 
been sold. The firm grossed $22,000 from a $400 cost. 



Win T\ . Davenport, Iowa 



PROGR \M: Take \ Break 




SPONSOR: Henke & Pillot \GENCY: Aylin Advertising 

( \I'M IK CASE HISTORY: Henke & Pillot is a chain 
oj 30 supermarkets, uses announcements on KPRC-TV to 
plug individual items and specials on sale. In one 20- 
second pitch, they announced a special on strawberries. 
As a direct result, the markets sold 18,000 crates — or 
216,000 boxes — of straivberries in less than three hours 
after the commercial went on the a?r. This means that 
i espouse to the one brief pitch amounted to sales at the 
rate of more than 1,200 units per minute. 



SEAT COVERS 



SPONSOR: Rayco Mfg. Co. AGENCY: Emil Mogul 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Rayco selected a mystery- 
detective series, Front Page Detective, to run 26 weeks 
in the New York market on W ABD {April through Sep- 
tember 1952. Fridays. 9:30 to 10:00 p.m.). During the 
run of the shoiv, the sponsor, who manufactures seat cov- 
ers, traced an average of 400 sales a week — averaging 
S26 per sale — to the program. This meant a sales gross 
of some .$10,400 a week from a weekly advertising expen- 
diture of about one-tenth that amount. 






WABD, New York 



PROGRAM: Front Page Detective 



SALAD SERVING SET 



SPONSOR: Saladmaster AGENCY: Vance Fawcett Ass'n 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: During KGMB-TV's first 
week on the air, Saladmaster bought tivo five-minute dem- 
onstration programs in class "A" time, 'from these, 56 
leads resulted; the company closed sales on 90'c of these 
leads. Previous to the firm's use of TV, the average time 
it took to close each sale was 45 minutes; afterwards, the 
average closing time for each sale ivas only 10 minutes. 
The advertising cost came to 49r of the sales gross. 



KGMB-TV. Honolulu 



PROGRAM: Five-minute demonstra- 
tion programs 



SPONSOR: Independent Grocer's' Association AGENCY! Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The IGA in the WTTV cov- 
erage area embraces 75 independent grocers. It sponsors 
the film series Dangerous Assignment witfc Brian Don- 
levy, Thursdays 8:30 to 9:00 p.m. The grocers had been 
selling an average of 20 cases a week of a private brand 
of canned fruit. After one announcement on the pro- 
gram plugging the item, sa'es on that one brand jumped 
to 1,000 cases a week. Dangerous Assignment is the only 
advertising the IGA is using in the area. 



WTTV. Blooniington, In< 



PROGRAM: Dangerous Assignment 



ftSOLIJVF 



SPONSOR: American Oil Co. AGENCY: Walter Speight 

CAPSI IK CASE HISTORY: On behalf of its local Shell 
distributors in and around Nashville, the American Oil 
Co. contracted for a half-hour film show, The Roller 
Derby, on WSM-TV. At the end of 13 weeks, Shell sta- 
tions hail handed out 10.000 copies of the Holler Derby 
News, a publication issued in connection with the pro- 
gram. In addition. Shell gas sales had forged 20' , ahead 
of the corresponding YZ-week period in 1951. 

WSM TV, Nashville PROGR \M: Roller Derbj 



Newest profit opportunity in television . . . 

WLEV-TV 

Bethlehem, Pa. 
Allentown • Easton 



^ ;"* only 



Wire 



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Represented by 



WLEV-TV, first television station in the Lehigh Valley, offers a 
dynamic profit opportunity to advertisers. Its market is long-known as 
a region of stable prosperity — as one of tremendous sales response. 
Top time available now. Write for information. 

A Steinman Station 



ROBERT MEEKER ASSOCIATES 



New York 



Chicago 



Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



26 JANUARY 1953 



49 



IMAGINE! 




WATC 



52 BRAND NE 
GRUENS FOR Y< 
TO GIVE AW- 



The Most Exciting 



Ever to Hit Radio! 




AMERICA'S 
NO 1 FAVORITE! 



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Period: 1-7 December 7952 



TITLE (DESCRIPTION!. SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER 



Range Riders (Western), CBS Film Sales, Flying "A" 



Superman (kid show), MPTV, Robt. Maxwell 



Multi-market 
average 
weighted 
rat'ngt 



21.6 



21.1 



7-STATION 
MARKETS 



6.5 



* 



¥ 



4-STATION 
MARKETS 



* 



78.8 



* 



3-STATION MARKE 



Atlanta Bait. Cine. 



Clcve. Columbus Del 



* 



* 24.5 



* 



* 



# 



4 



Boston Blaekie (mystery), Ziv TV 



19.4 



6.9 



* 



28.2 



* 77.5 35.3 



# 24.5 



* 



Cisco Kid (Western), Ziv TV 



19. J 



70.2 72.9 



78.4 70.6 



79.8 77.3 25.3 24.5 # 20.3l| 



Jeffrey Jones (mystery), CBS Film Sales, L. Parsons 



18.9 



* 



20.4 



* 



* 



* 7.81 



llopulong CassUly (Western), NBC Filr 



18.0 



74.2 72.0 



76.8 20.0 



77.5 77.3 75.3 74.3 75.8i 



Foreign Intrigue (adventure), JWT, Sheldon Reynolds 



17.7 



18.9 10.4 



72.6 77.6 



75.3 



27.3 79.3 



* 77.3 



Kit C€irson (Western), MCA TV, Revue Productions 
The Unexpected (drama), Ziv TV 



17.7 



# 77.4 



76.0 9.8 



75.3 72.8 



* 



17.6 



74.2 4.0 



16.4 



* 



9.0 9.0 



* 



72.5 
78.8 



73.3 



28.5 77.0 



Abbott & Costello (situation comedy), MCA TV, TCA 



16.8 



18.0 70.9 



# 



# 70.8 



* 72.3 



Dangerous Assignment (adventure), NBC Film, Donlevy 



I U. I 



73.7 70.5 



75.8 72.2 



28.8 



8.5 79.8 74.3 76.8 75.3 



Jeweler's Showcase (drama), Stewart Reynolds 



1 6. 1 



16.4 75.2 



73.8 77.4 



72.0 



78.5 



* 



# 70.3 



Cfliltff Smith (adventure), PSI-TV, Tableau 



13.7 



7.3 



7 7.4 4.6 



75.0 5.0 



# 



* 7.3 



Mild BUI Hickok (Western), William Broidy 



15.0 



7.5 70.5 



75.0 72.2 



23.0 73.3 76.3 72.3 22.8 



7 0.8 : 



Laurel & Hardy (comedy), Unity TV Corp. 



f 1.0 



9.2 



* 



* 



* 77.5 73.3 



Death Valley Bays (Western), McCann-Erickson 



II. I 



5.0 



* 



9.0 7 7.4 



75.8 9.5 



* 



* 9.8 



' 



Bollywood Off-Beat (mystery), UTP, M. Parsonette 



11.1 



* 8.7 



10.6 



* 



74.8 



* 



¥ 73.8 



Ularch of Time (documentary), March of Time 



10.5 



2.2 3.5 



6.6 7 7.2 



74.3 9.3 9.3 9.8 73.5 7 7.3 



Terry & the Pirates (kid show), Official, Dougfai 



9.7 



3.4 



* 



* 



* 



* 72.3 70.0 



\ 



Dick Tracy (mystery), Snader 



«..'» 



4.4 5.0 



9.4 70.8 



70.8 



* 



75.0 



Second SPONSOR-TelePulse ratings show two mystery series moviny to top 



Two shows that have advanced in standings since the ap- 
pearance of the first of these cross-country spot rating 
charts (29 December 1952) are Boston Blaekie and Jef- 
frey Jones, both mysteries. Blaekie moved from fourth to 
third place, while Jones hopped all the way from ISth to 
5th spot. (The previously published rating chart was for 
the period of 5-1] November 1952.) Another program that 
did quite a leap-frog was Superman, which went from ninth 



to second place in the same period of time. 

However, the Westerns continue to hold their own as 
solid audience builders in most local markets. For the 
second successive month Range Riders is the No. 1 show. 
Not far below are Cisco Kid. Hopalon<i Cassidy, and Kit 
Carson. Cisco, which was 12/// place on the previous chart 
with a rating of 16.4, is currently in fourth place. Also 
definitely on the nay up is Borax's Death Valley Days. 



52 



illllllllllllllllllJIIJIIOJIIIIIIIIIIIII 

SPONSOR 

















































2-STATIOK 


MARKETS 


i- 


STATIOt 


1 MARKETS 


Birm. 


Bosl 


Dayton 


Mill 


Buffalo 


New 0. 


Seattle 


St. Louis 




25.0 


* 


27.3 


¥ 


50.5 


44.5 


¥ 


2.8 


* 


* 


75.3 


38.5 


24.5 


# 


33.0 


* 


24.0 


22.8 


30.5 


23.5 


48.0 


* 


30.5 


J7.8 


27.8 


* 


79.3 


36.0 


27.0 


44.0 


37.5 


1 * 


76.5 


* 


# 


* 


# 


# 


* 


1* 


__ 9.8 


9.8 


25.3 


30.0 


38.5 


32.0 


24.0 


* 


77.0 


"* 


22.0 


# 


50.5 


* 


* 


# 


72.5 


22.8 


# 


* 


35.5 


* 


37.5 


I * 


7 7.3 


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72.5 


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78.8 


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23.5 


36.5 


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27.5 


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k 



oadcast in tour or more markets 

Iverage weighted rating arrived at as follows: 
^dividual market ratings are weighted in 

portion to the number of TV homes in each 
Urket. For instance, in December 1952 
liePulse gave a weight of 13 to New York 

compared to a weight of 1 for Cincinnati. 

Urns not broadcast in this market as of 

' December 1952. 



26 JANUARY 1953 



Coming Up 

Perfect 
Precision 




"SELECTIVE PRINTING 
FOR EVERY SCENE" 

This is one of the essential depart- 
ments at Precision which doesn't 
depend on automatic machinery. 
Only intelligence and skill can be 
depended on to select a timing value 
for the correct printing of essential 
elements. That's what you get in a 
Precision timed print — a selective 
printing exposure for every scene. 




YOUR ASSURANCE OF 
BETTER 16mm PRINTS 



IS Years Research and Spe- 
cialization in every phase of 
16mm processing, visual and 
aural. So organized and equip- 
ped that all Precision jobs are 
of the highest quality. 

Individual Attention is given 
each film, each reel, each scene, 
each frame — through every 
phase of the complex business of 
processing — assuring you of the 
very best results. 

Our Advanced Methods and 

our constant checking and adop- 
tion of up-to-the-minute tech- 
niques, plus new engineering 
principles and special machinery 



Precision Film Laboratories — a di- 
vision of J. A. Maurer, Inc., has 14 
years of specialization in the 16mm 
field, consistently meets the latest de- 
mands for higher quality and speed. 



enable us to offer service un- 
equalled anywhere! 

Newest Facilities in the 16mm 
field are available to customers : 
of Precision, including the most 
modern applications of elec- 
tronics, chemistry, physics, optics, 
sensitometry and densitometry— 
including exclusive Maurer- 
designed equipment— your guar- 
antee that only the best is yours 
at Precision! 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46th St., 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



53 





RELIEF THROUGH MODERN'S 
3-point film traffic and library 
service especially designed for 
agencies, syndicators, producers 

and distributors. 

1. Process control that gives you exact 
rnformation on every program from 
scheduling to return of the film after 
showing. 

2. Editing and film maintenance con* 
trol that keeps your prints in optimum 
condition. 

a. Shipping control that places your 
prints — programs or commercials — in 
the hands of TV stations on time every 
time. 

These plus many other features 
constitute our complete television film 
traffic service. 



MODERN 
TALKING 
PICTURE 
SERVICE 



Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

TV Division 

45 Rockefeller Plaza 

New York 20, New York 

EXCHANGES IN 

Chicago • Los Angeles • New York 



Canada Dry's test: What Canada Dry is doing with Terry 
and the Pirates in New York may become a common strategy 
for sponsors in the country's three leading markets. Canada 
Dry is airing the same installment of Terry twice weekly in 
New York: Sunday (7:00 p.m. I over WPIX and Tuesday 
(7:30 p.m.) over WABD. Reason: Set ownership in New York 
is large enough to provide separate audiences for each showing. 
If the ralings for the WPIX-WABD telecast prove satisfactory, 
Canada Dry may try using two stations in Chicago and Los 
Angeles. Terry, sold by Official Films through the Mathes 
agency, is now running in 48 markets. 

* * * 

Paramount guarantees 39 films: Paramount Pictures' 
launching of its subsidiary. Paramount Television Productions, 
into the TV film field has this unique aspect: It's the first time 
I hat a major Hollywood studio has underwritten so big a series 
100%. PTP is getting the full financing for a series of 39 
half-hour programs from the parent corporation — and without 
a prospective sponsor. The Danzigers (Edward J. and Harry 
Lee) will produce and Burt Balaban will supervise the series 
as director of programing and production. 

* * * 

What do you know about reruns? Even in the best of 
advertiser circles, reruns have taken on almost all the respecta- 
bility accorded a first-run. Nevertheless, if there's any infor- 
mation film buyers can't have enough of, it's about reruns. 
They recognize the fact that the syndicating of TV film is, as 
one syndicator puts it, a business that s still being played pretty 
much by ear, but that doesn't lessen the agency buyer's need 
for any and all sorts of data about reruns. In agencies recom- 
mendations are as a rule buttressed by facts and factors. 

A salient ingredient of this column will therefore be statisti- 
cal and other material about reruns. Here, as a starter, are 
what Walter A. Scanlon of CBS Television Film Sales considers 
some important factors in the economics of reruns: 

• Frequently programs which fared strongly on first run 
come up with even higher ratings on subsequent runs because 
of increased sets, word-of-mouth advertising, greater familiarity 
with the show. 

• The type of market determines the value and frequency 
of showings. A show can safely make the rounds at short in- 
tervals in a multi-station market, while in a single-station mar 
ket the tendency is to wait from six months to a year before 
lepeating a film. 

• One of the classic rerun stories of the TV film business 
involves the Gene Autry show. There was a time in Chicago 
when the second run of the Autry TV show was aired at 1 :00 
Sunday afternoon while the show's first run was still being 
telecast several hours later on the same day. The second run 
raked up both a larger audience and a better rating than the 
original run. 



54 



SPONSOR 




Look 

evision^iward 
ners are seen in 



^Northern California 



exclusively on 



W\El 



. LUCILLE BALL and DESI ARNAZ 

. WHAT'S MY LINE 

. BLUE RIBBON BOUTS 

. JOHN DALY 

. SEE IT NOW (Edward R.Murrow) 



Greatest Shows 
Brightest Stars 



26 JANUARY 1953 




'Program and personality 
awards made annually by 
Look Magazine on the 
judgment of top television 
executives throughout 
the nation. 



"•7 r^riV? TELEVISION CHANNEL C 
JALt UaA SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 9 

Affiliated with CBS and DuMont Television Networks 
Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 



55 





Whose job is if to see that standards of good taste 
itre adhered to in TV? 



F. L. Frost 



Advertising Manager 

Tide Water Associated Oi 

New York 



Co. 




Miss Johnsen 



The 

picked panel 

answers 
Mr. Frost 

Whose job is it 
to see that stand- 
ards of good 
taste are adhered 
to in television? 
It is everyone's 
job! At the Amer- 
ican Broadcast- 
ing Co. the conti- 
nuity acceptance 
department is 
charged with the 
responsibility of enforcing the policies 
of the network to assure good taste in 
programing material. The editors check 
all material, scripts, advertising copy, 
and films to make certain that the\ 
adhere to the standards set by ABC 
and the industry. However, everyone 
else who has any connection with the 
writing or production of a television 
program shares that responsibility. 

The American Broadcasting Co. has 
20 well-educated, practical, and sensi- 
ble editors at its five stations in New 
York, Detroit, Chicago, Hollywood, and 
San Francisco. 

These editors, while constantly vigi- 
lant to avoid a lapse which might of- 
fend the sensibilities of the television 
audience, are equally vigilant not to 
let unnecessary censorship masquerade 
in the guise of continuity acceptance. 
Intelligent application of the rules per- 
mits the great works of literature to be 
performed within the accepted stand- 
ard- of good taste. 

The "approved-for-broadcast" script 
i- then given to the ABC director who 
is present at every program whether 
produced by ABC. an advertising agen- 



cy, or a program packager. He has the 
responsibility for seeing to it that com- 
pany policy is adhered to in the final 
production. But it is the performer 
who has the final responsibility for re- 
membering the audience for which he 
is performing. 

The public, too, has a responsibility 
—in their constructive, critical com- 
ment as well as commendation. 

Grace M. Johnsen 

Director of Continuity Acceptance 

ABC 

New York 



With NBC from 
its inception, like 
most other broad- 
casters, a staunch 
supporter of the 
NARTB"s Televi- 
sion Code (which, 
incidentally, came 
years after NBC 
adopted its own 
stiff code). it 
goes without say- 
ing from where I sit at NBC that this 
networks position unequivocally is that 
broadcasters themselves are responsi- 
ble for maintaining standards of good 
taste on their programs. What con- 
stitutes good taste is a subject on which 
agreement has not been achieved. A 
subcommittee of the House Interstate 
Commerce Committee in fact has spe- 
cifically decided, following widelv pub- 
licized investigations of the television 
medium, that tastes of the American 
public are so diversified that it would 
be hard in the extreme to pin down in 
rule-of-thumb form a guide. 

These facts notwithstanding, none of 
us is so naive as to think — because 
most of our programing originates in 
metropolitan areas, where sophistica : , 




Mr. Helfrich 



lion is alleged to hold sway — that we 
have no responsibility in the control of 
our program fare. In the Thomas Y. 
Crowell Co.'s anticipated publication 
this March of the "Television Advertis- 
ing and Production Handbook" edited 
by Irving Settel and Norman Glenn, a 
little more space is available to ex- 
pound on these matters in greater de- 
tail. One example pertinent enough to 
repeat I put this way: "An off-the- 
shoulder dress, like a plunging neck- 
line, can be overdone. A Milwaukee 
viewer quoted in the press, summed it 
up fairly well. T am not an old prude. 
I am a very up-to-date middle-aged 
woman and have a very fine young 
daughter. She also wears strapless 
dresses, but not topless.' Amen to that." 

Specifically, and again quoting from 
the chapter in the "TV Handbook" in 
which I endeavor to outline a philoso- 
phy for television censorship, "spon- 
sors and broadcasters for reasons 
shared and for pressures peculiar to 
each, must concern themselves with 
how whodunits will present a murder 
or a string of murders, how and if a 
suicide can be handled, how all as- 
pects of human sexuality are to be 
touched upon, how the drinking of al- 
cohol in any degree will be shown, etc. 

The findings of the Congressional 
subcommittee would appear to indi- 
cate that broadcasters have come a con- 
siderable way towards meeting the ob- 
jectives behind the establishment of an 
industry code. Where any of us are 
still challenged as being derelict, it 
seems to me one observation justifiably 
included in rebuttal is that some criti- 
cism of television is irresponsible both 
in its form and in its content. There 
is a tendency in some quarters to tab- 
ulate the number of fatalities in the 
plots of a broadcast day as would a 
devotee of modern drama condemn 



56 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Duratn 



Hamlet because it is full of killings. 

My own feeling, expressed in the 
Crowell volume, is that an "examina- 
tion of television, sinned against and 
sinning, must be carried on in the 
context of the world in which we are 
living . . . criticism of television where 
it reflects our world is an after-the-fact 
sort of thing and the critics ... are 
tending to pass the buck to TV for 
some civic derelictions of their own. 

Stockton Helfrich 

Director of Continuity Acceptance 

NBC 

New York 



Generally speak- 
ing, good taste in 
television is not 
being violated as 
much as s o m e 
sources would 
have you believe. 
There is the same 
proportion of nice 
people with in- 
stinctive good 
taste in the tele- 
vision industry as in any other field. 
However, the nature of the medium 
is such that the slightest inclination 
towards bad taste is immediately no- 
ticed and criticized. Television must 
be extra-cautious since there are so 
many persons in other media of com- 
munication who hope to find a cause 
celebre every time TV offends. 

Everyone connected with TV actual- 
ly shares the responsibility for good 
taste. But I would say that those who 
have the greatest policing responsibil- 
ity are those who have the most at 
stake; namely, the advertising agency 
and the network. 

If an agency has sufficient under- 
standing of the client's problems to 
package a program and write the com- 
mercial, then it very likely has suffi- 
cient discrimination to adhere to good 
taste. Where it has content-control of 
program material, a violation of the 
viewer's sensibilities is basically the 
agency's fault because it has had the 
opportunity to check all material be- 
fore airing. On the other hand, if the 
network controls the program, it is re- 
sponsible to the agency for adhering to 
acceptable standards. 

Arthur E. Duram 
Manager, Radio-TV Department 
Fuller & Smith & Ross 
New York 




AND STILL 

GOING 

STRONG! 




• Write, Wire 
or Phone Your 
JOHN BLAIR Man! 



• Yes . . . for the past 140 
consecutive weeks, the 
Shell Oil Company has 
sponsored "Shell News" 
daily over WDSU. 

• Shell has just renewed its 
contract for another 52 
week schedule. We are 
proud of the confidence 
placed in our station by 
this sponsor... since WDSU 
is the sole radio salesman 
for Shell in the New Or- 
leans market. 

• This is but another ex- 
ample of WDSU's effective- 
ness in producing results 
for sponsors. We're doing it 
daily for our present spon- 
sors . . . and we'd like the 
opportunity to show you 
additional proof of WDSU's 
powerful sales impact. 



WDS13 



>6 JANUARY 1953 



57 



Radio 



* a message horn out sponsoi 



by Bob Foreman 



Ti 



hat vital and varied group oi 
people and places which manufac- 
turers refer to as "the trade" must 
he taken into full consideration 
when any advertising is planned. 
"The trade*' may be a wholesaler 
organization that is part of the 
manufacturing company or a com- 
pany-owned network of outlets. It 
may be 10.000 independent stores, 
a brace of distributors, or jobbers. 
But whatever it is, the reaction of 
this group to all phases of an ad- 
vertising campaign is of first im- 
portance, since trade-cooperation 
can make the campaign a success; 
lack of it can kill it. 

Even media selection is of basic 
interest to this group — and, from 
what I've seen, embarking on tele- 
vision is just about the best way of 
stimulating enthusiasm in the 
trade. There's nothing very odd 
about this because the trade, what- 
ever its structural relation to the 
advertiser's organization is, of 
course, made up of people — and a 
goodly percentage of people these 
davs watch television avidly, thus 



are interested in the device person- 
ally. That's why exciting the trade 
about a new TV campaign is usu- 
ally a great deal easier than whip- 
ping them into a frenzy over, say, 
an extensive showing of three-sheet 
posters or even table-tents. 

Merely by launching a TV ad- 
vertising campaign, advertisers 
have found it possible to get whole- 
hearted trade cooperation the likes 
of which they may never have had 
before. This has proved to be true 
whether the television appropria- 
tion was limited to a few spots a 
week in a limited number of mar- 
kets or whether it consisted of a 
( o-tly new network show. A well- 
chosen program, spotted locally, 
will of itself also engender real 
interest. But it's the medium that 
provides the stimulant as well as 
the way the medium is utilized. 
The reason for this is obvious. 

It is caused by the fact that TV 
is new and thus fresh and exciting 
in contrast to the older media. That 
is what makes it so trade-worthy. 
Few people engaged in the distri- 



Cheer campaign is pounded home with raucous echo effect, followed by women viewing clothes 




bution end of any business, wheth- 
er it's a family drug store or a 
large rack-jobber, have not been 
first-hand witnesses to some of the 
magic that television has already 
performed. They've seen new prod- 
ucts push their way onto shelves 
where space is as hard to get as 
tickets to Cinerama — they've 
watched products, unheard of a 
few months before, elbow out old 
familiars with years of standing. 

They've also seen well-known 
products gain new luster, an al- 
most unbelievable aura of excite- 
ment, merely because the people 
involved in advertising these old 
standbys have effectively used the 
new medium. 

The mere mechanics of swing- 
ing magazine and newspaper ad- 
vertising over onto film or into live 
television commercials is enough 
to give a newsiness to the message 
despite the fact that the copy 
themes may be as old as the prod- 
uct itself. Furthermore, the new 
dimension that TV makes availa- 
ble to the copywriter — motion — 
is of tremendous value. 

So we have distinct advantages, 
from a commercial standpoint as 
well as from a program one, that 
television affords us — advantages 
that can serve us well in our vital 
trade connections. Still we can't 
rest on these laurels. It's necessary 
to go beyond what we get for free 
—in other words, to do more than 
merely boast that we are in TV. 
TV merchandising programs should 
be put together with as much in- 
genuity as magazines use. These 
efforts must be superimposed on 
top of all the advantages we don't 
have to work to achieve. In this 
respect one TV advertiser I know 
of has sent out sloryboards of his 
TV copy to the trade. You can rest 
assured that the dealer organiza- 
tion follows these scripts closely 
during the show. Here is a fine 
way of keeping a sales organiza- 
tion aware of selling messages as 
well as helping thi- personnel to 
pattern correctly its own on-the- 
floor discussions with actual cus- 
tomers. Here the trade has the sat- 
isfaction of being "insiders." 



58 



SPONSOR 



YOU MIGHT COAST A MILE 
56 SECONDS — _ 



BUT... 

(OU WONT GET FAR </"" 
N WESTERN MICHIGAN 
WITHOUT THE 
ETZER STATIONS! 



If you want to break sales records in Western Michi- 
gan, climb aboard the Fetzer pacemaker — WKZO- 
WJEF in radio, WKZO-TV in television. 

WKZO-WJEF RADIO 

WKZO, Kalamazoo, and WJEF, Grand Rapids, are 
Western Michigan's outstanding radio values. To- 
gether, they deliver 57% more Kalamazoo and Grand 
Rapids listeners than the next-best two-station choice 
in these two cities — yet cost 20% less! Rural audi- 
ences are BIG, too. 1949 8MB figures credited 
WKZO-WJEF with a 52.9% increase over 1946 in 
unduplicated nighttime audience, a 46.7% daytime 
increase, and there is good reason to believe similar 
gains have been registered since 1949. 

*In 1946, the Republic Miners ran four one-mile heats 
per mile. 




WKZO-TV 

WKZO-TV, Channel 3, is the Official Basic CBS Tele- 
vision Outlet for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids. It de- 
livers an excellent picture to more than a quarter- 
million TV homes in 28 Western Michigan and 
Northern Indiana counties — a bigger television mar- 
ket than Rochester, New Orleans or Seattle! The 
October 1952 Videodex Report proves that WKZO- 
TV gets 106.1% more afternoon viewers — and 
213.4% more evening viewers — than Western Michi- 
gan's other TV station! 

Get all the Fetzer facts, today. Write direct or ask 
Avery-Knodel. 

at Lake Placid in 4:24.3 for an average of 66 seconds 



WJEF WKZO-TV WKZO 

ttfL in GRAND RAPIDS ti?P A IN WESTERN MICHIGAN ^4 IN KALAMAZOO 
and KENT COUNTY AND NORTHERN INDIANA and GREATER 

l WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(cbs radio) ■H^^^HHHHF' (cbs radio) 



ALL THREE OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

FETZER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC., EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



This is 
McCrary Auto Service, Inc. 




This is what 
Mr. Carl McCrary says 

"We have .sponsored Fulton Lewis, Jr., since JJ T PNF 

(Brevard, N. C.) went on the air. 

The program has been satisfactory in every iray. 

It has given us a lot of publicity, and we"re happy 

to say that we are well satisfied. It 

is our intention to continue to 

sponsor Fulton Lewis, Jr., indefinitely." 



This is Fulton Lewis, Jr. 




whose 5-times-a-week program is available to local 
advertisers at local time cost plus low pro-rated talent 
cost. Currently sponsored on 372 stations by more 
than 750 advertisers (among them 64 automotive 
firms), the program oilers a tested means of reaching 
customers and prospects. For availabilities, check 
your Mutual outlet — or the Co-operative Program 
Department, Mutual Broadcasting System, IttO 
Broadway, NYC 18 (or Tribune Tower, ( 'hicago 11). 



commercial reviews 



-,.,.. 



TELEVISION 

si'iiNsdii: Procter & Gamble: Cheer 

AGENCY: Young & Rubicam, N.Y.C. 

program : Announcements 

producer: Screen Gems 

Cheer is "blue magic" and anyone who 
doesn't know it these days is either deaf 
or lives in the comparative safety of a non- 
TV, non-radio area (if such there be) . 

This state of affairs, which in advertis- 
ing terms can only be considered a tribute 
to the techniques and persistence of the 
Cheer-leaders, is achieved in main by a 
rather raucous echo chamber effect which 
bellows the words — each with a slightly 
different pitch and degree of echo, thus 
compounding the annoyance value while 
doubling, it must be admitted, the effec- 
tiveness of the gimmick. To help the au- 
dio, as if this were needed, an optical zoom 
from the key-words on the package is 
effected. 

The remaining footage shows washing- 
women examining wash, gazing into a 
(very fine!) view of an open washing ma- 
chine heaped with white, churning suds. 

The basic idea in this product, adroitly 
planted there by the manufacturer, is the 
color and it is this virtue which is wisely 
exploited to the fullest. 

sponsor: 4- Way Cold Tablets 

AGENCY: Harry B. Cohen Advertising 

Co., Inc., N.Y.C. 
program : Chainbreaks 

producer: Film Graphics, Inc. 

If the relief in the product is as fast 
as the sound track on this chainbreak, the 
common cold is doomed forever. In at- 
tempting to depict speed, 4-Way Cold 
Tablets have digressed to the irrelevant by 
showing quick cuts of a toboggan, a speed- 
boat in flight, plus a few other hasty items 
— all in just a couple of seconds. While 
the pictures scurry along, the announcer 
rushes by at breakneck speed and comes 
out slightly ahead. Unfortunately, he is 
talking about colds while the video shows 
the aforementioned irrelevancies, so with 
audio and video at odds, the viewer is a 
bir confused. 

The four advantages (ways) of the 
product zoom up in rapid but effective 
succession at the close of the spot to regis- 
ter as well as anything could in so cluttered 
and so frantic a 20-second announcement. 
There's enough material in this chain- 
break, I'd say, for a full minute. 



60 



SPONSOR 



U fo yet 



wro 

Evidence of WLS position as a result producing medium for advertising 
is found in the impressive group of advertisers who, like those listed below, 

use the station consistently year after year. They and many others 
have found that listener loyalty to WLS extends to the station's advertisers 

— and that midwest people buy the products they hear about on WLS. 
Listener loyalty produces advertising results. 



Bristol-Myers 9 yrs 

Ralston-Purina 12 yrs 

Allied Mills 14 yrs 

Block Drugs 9 yrs 

Campbell Cereal Co. 23 yrs 

Consolidated Products 12 yrs 

Phillips Petroleum 9 yrs 

General Foods 9 yrs 

Standard Brands 7 yrs 



Pioneer Hibred Co. 16 yrs 

Chrysler Corp. 8 yrs 

Oshkosh Overall Co. 16 yrs 

Procter & Gamble 16 yrs 

Carter Medicine Co. 15 yrs 

Flex-O-Glass 16 yrs 

Lever Bros. 8 yrs 

Hulman & Co. 13 yrs 

Little Crow Milling Co. 14 yrs 



Colgate-Palmolive-Peet 10 yrs 

Vick Chemical Co. 14 yrs 

Murphy Products Co. 21 yrs 

Groves Laboratories 10 yrs 

Sterling Drug 9 yrs 
Keystone Steel & 

Wire Co. 21 yrs 

Metropolitan Lite Ins. 8 yrs 



50,000 WATTS 
CLEAR CHANNEL 




ABC NETWORK 
890 KILOCYCLES 



PRAIRIE 
FARMER 
STATION 



CHICAGO 7 



REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



26 JANUARY 1953 



61 



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with LOIS COLLIER as "mary" and 






FRANK ORTH AS "FARRADAY" 






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SPONSORS BUY IT BECAUSE THEY KN( 
THEY RENEW IT BECAUSE IT'S PROVED G 

SPONSOR IT AND THE PROFITS 




j*»- 1 'V 1 


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SUCCESSFUL 

UTIVE SHOW! 






phone 1 - 







BECAUSE 



IT HAS A NEW TOWER 
1914 FT. ABOVE SEA LEVEL. 



ITS POWER IS NOW 
50,000 WATTS. 



IT IS CENTRAL NEW YORK'S 
MOST POWERFUL TV STATION. 



IT IS LOCATED IN THE 
HEART OF AN 
INDUSTRIAL AREA. 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 



WHEN 

TELEVISION 

SYRACUSE 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
A MEREDITH STATION 




agency profile 



Carlos Luue 



Director of TV and motion pictures in Brazil, 
J. Walter Thompson Co. 



Currently in New York to study television techniques, particularly 
animation and "live" spot commercials, is Carlos Lage, J. Walter 
Thompson's director of TV and motion pictures in Brazil. 

"'One of the problems facing TV advertising in Brazil today.*" he 
says, "is the training of technicians, writers, producers, and talent." 
With three stations in operation ( one in Rio, two in Sao Paulo, and 
a third due this spring) demands increase daily. His ambition is to 
perfect "live" spots, which he calls "simpler and more logical than 
film spots." On his return to Brazil next month, he plans to develop 
this medium by introducing it to radio or theatre talent or by hiring 
talent right into the Thompson organization for long-term TV 
training. 

*"A major advantage of working right up from the soil," he re- 
marks, "is that we can grow with the medium and, in our early ad- 
ventures, avoid the production platitudes often obvious in commer- 
cials on eight-year-old U. S. television." He predicts that very soon 
now, trained talent will begin to produce excellent live spots: within 
six months the animated technique will be ready for commercial ap- 
plica.ion; and in a very short period Brazil will take its place among 
the key TV countries of the world. 

Drawing on a solid theatrical background. Lage has not found it 
too difficult to transpose dramatic values into TV production. During 
the war years he abandoned the theatre group in which he had been 
writing, adapting, and producing plays in Rio de Janeiro and Sao 
Paulo, to come to the U. S. and work in the radio department of the 
Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs I forerunner of the Voice of 
America). After working with the J. Arthur Rank film organiza- 
tion in Brazil, New York, and London, he returned to Brazil to 
join J. Walter Thompson Co. 

In his own back yard Carlos has chalked up a number of adver- 
tising "firsts." He was a pioneer in the use of Brazil-produced ani- 
mated spots which he utilized for Atlantic Refining Co. and the Bra- 
zilian Scotch Tape Co. And to make some early TV film commer- 
cials he went out on location with an amateur crew, then cut and 
edited the films himself. He is now working on what will be Brazil's 
first hour-long TV comedy show. With knowledge of new techniques 
lie is bringing back to his native land he should play an active role 
in the development of T\ in Brazil, where he will divide his time 
between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. * * • 



64 



SPONSOR 



one low rate 
"corners" this 

meat 



West Virginia 





here's the lush potential of "Personality's" half-millivolt area alonel 



rOTAL POPULATION 

rOTAL FAMILIES 

RETAIL SALES 

POOD SALES 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE SALES 

FURNITURE AND 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS SALES 

EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME 



992,994 

250,337 

$543,571,000 

$111,735,000 

$80,496,000 

$29,969,000 
$965,894,000 



Source — U.S. Census and 8MB Survey, 1950 



POWER 

PROGRAMMING 

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Two power-pocked stations to provide 
a double "knockout" punch . . with FM 
for good measure. 

The best in ABC and CBS network 
radio, plus a local flavoring of pro- 
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Publishing monthly audience-building 
consumer magazines to help promote 
your program and product. 

Operated jointly and staffed by com- 
petent, capable personnel who live . . 
and love . . radio. 



BECKLEY — 560KC 

CBS Radio Network Affiliate 

1000 W DAY* 500 W NIGHT 



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CHARLESTON — 950 KC 
ABC Radio Network Affiliate 



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M 




Joe E. Smith, Jr., Incorporated • represented nationally by Weed & Co. 



I Will! I I 




"fVm/ Lombardo" watch promotion opens lavish Zir push 

Am radio sponsor bankrolling Fred- the show. In the larger ads, the spon- 
eric W. Ziv's Guy Lombardo Shoiv this sors will have space to call attention 



year will receive $2,500 worth of Gruen 
watches to distribute to his local audi- 
ence as part of a special merchandising 
tie-in. 

This announcement, made at a re- 
cent Ziv sales convention in Cincinnati, 
was the opening gun in Ziv's elaborate 
and extensive advertising, promotion. 




convention 



and merchandising campaigns to sup- 
port its radio programs in 1953. The 
company has increased its budget and 
enlarged its staff in preparation for the 
year's stepped-up radio activities to 
prove, as company President Frederic 
W. Ziv said recently, that "radio is still 
the advertiser's best buy, when proper- 
ly merchandised and promoted." 

The I .ombardo show, one in the V.w 
stable of top-name transcribed pro- 
grams, will have the most elaborate 
merchandising and advertising features 
of all. In addition to the watches: 

1. Each sponsor will also receive 
free 2,000 copies of "Listeners' Clue 
Books'" imprinted with his name. These 
books will carry the titles of the 156 
mystery tunes which Lombardo will 
play during the 52 weeks of the pro- 
gram. On the show, listeners will be 
told thev may pick up these books in 
the sponsor's or dealer's place of busi- 
ness. Listeners will keep these books 
to refer to them all during the run oi 
the program. 

2. Ziv will take newspaper ads of 



to their merchandise or service. 

3. Ziv will provide posters, stream- 
ers, shelf-talkers, bottle-hangers, and 
table-tents free, with room for the spon- 
sor's name on each. 

4. Free identification announcements 
cut by Lombardo will go to the sta- 
tions, may be used as station breaks. 

5. Each station and sponsor will 
also receive a booklet of instructions 
on the plan behind the show and how 
to get maximum results with the pro- 
motion material. 

At the Ziv sales convention, Alvin E. 
Linger, Ziv v. p. in charge of radio sales, 
indicated that Ziv plans to "bombard" 
stations, advertisers, and agencies with 
new plans, new programs, new mer- 
chandising this year "because we are 
going to see to it that our sponsors 
get more than their share of 1953 busi- 
ness." 

Picture above was snapped at sales 
convention. Shown are (1. to r.) Sid 
Freeman. Great Lakes Div. sales man- 
ager; Frederic W. Ziv, comnanv presi- 
dent; Jack Skinner, new salesman for 
Indiana area: and Russ Stone, new 
salesman for Buffalo. N. Y. district. 

• * • 

Bottlers reap fast profits 
front radio tfivi'-awau show 

Several soft drink bo'tlers around 
the country have been reporting fast 
and furious sales results from a pack- 
aged radio giveaway program. The 
Silver Dollar Man. 

This 15-minute program, general!) 
aired all year 'round, is a high-tempo 
telephone show which gives away sil- 
ver dollars to people in the area. 

Scheduled for the most part in the 
earlv evening (between 0:30 and 8:00 
p.m.), the show features the top-flight 
sports announcer of the local radio sta- 
tion. He carries on a conversation with 
telephone participants against a back- 
ground of excitement, screaming sirens. 



silver dollars. Telephone calls go to a 
selected list of names covering every 
section of the city. The party answer- 
ing the phone is advised by the an- 
nouncer that a Silver Dollar man, in a 
radio-dispatched patrol car, is racing 
to his home. Upon arrival, the Silver 
Dollar man gives the participant one 
silver dollar for every bottle of the 
sponsor's product found in the refrig- 
erator. One winner in Tulsa received 
40 silver dollars. 

Roval Crown Cola reported the pro- 
gram scored a big success for its bev- 
erages in the Ponca City, Okla.. mar- 
ket (WBBZl. A leading cola bottler 
in Tulsa I KTUL I is concentrating the 
bulk of the firm's ad monev on the 
show. At WCBT, Roanoke Rapids. N. 
C, before the Silver Dollar Man had 
been on tw'o weeks, the sponsor added 
another quarter-hour segment to his 
original schedule. 

The program was originated by R. 
A. I Bob I Perrott as a promotional 
project for his Dr. Pepper plant in 
Brunswick. Ga. It was so effective that 
he packaged the idea and made it avail- 
able to other bottlers. * * * 

Briefly . . . 

WIP's recent tie-in with Newsweek 
magazine now has many of the city's 
newsboys wearing change aprons im- 
printed with "Listen to WIP, 610 on 
dial," as well as Newsweek. This 
year-'round promotional boost for both 




various sizes arid themes to promote madly ringing te'enhones. and jingling 



WIP pres., Ben Gimbel, models newsboy apron 

the station and the magazine was 
worked out by Ed Wallis, WIP promo- 
tion director, Thomas Appleby, News- 
week circulation manager, and Joseph 
Kohut. Central News Co. The News- 
week staff distributed the aprons to 
every newsboy lover 300) in major 
Philadelphia area; within three days. 
85 /^ of them were being worn. 
# * * 

The North Dakota Broadcasting Co. 
I licensee of K.CJB. Minot and KSJB. 



66 



SPONSOR 



Jamestown I gave out unique Christ- 
mas gifts to some 200 radio timebuy- 
ers, agency people, and radio stars all 
over the country. The two stations 
have royalties on mineral rights to 
some land in North Dakota on which 
oil has recently been discovered. In 
the spirit of holiday giving, they de- 
cided to share these; they drew up offi- 
cial Assignment of Royalty certificates 
and sent them out with appropriate 
greetings to the lucky 200. Most of the 
recipients were overwhelmed at the 
very novel — and lucrative — gift. One 
agencyman said he got everything else 
for Christmas but an oil well, and now. 
by golly, he even has that. 

•x- a -::- 

Five competing Hartford County, 
Conn., car dealers are jointly sponsor- 
ing a radio quiz show on WONS. 
Auto Tune Derby, aired daily at 6:30 
p.m. ) telephones contestants, asks each 



YOU'LL SELL MORE 
ON CHANNEL 4 because 

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MONTANA 

THE TREASVRE STATE OF THE 48 
Representatives: 

Cill-Keefe & Perna, Inc. 
N. Y.. Chi., LA., and S.F. 



Competitive dealers join in cooperative plan 

two questions, the second of which is 
the "jackpot" question. To answer the 
"jackpot," the contestant must tell at 
which of the five sponsors he or she 
can find the particular used car special 
described by the show's m.c. In ar- 
rangement-making stage, sponsors and 
station representatives got together for 
this picture: (1. to r. standing) James 
Cannon. Packard- Windsor; Harold La- 
Bier. Fitzgerald Motors (Ford); Phil 
Zoppi, WONS sales rep; Herbert Jes- 
ter, W. Hart Buick; (seated, 1. to r. ) : 
Arthur Mossberg. Arthur Motor Sales 
I Studebaker) ; Cy Kaplan, WONS sales 
manager; Joe Wiley, Manchester Mo- 
tor Sales I Oldsmobile ) ; Martin Sayet. 
Fitzgerald Motors. 

"The WQXR Network," consisting 
of 17 FM stations covering New York. 
Connecticut, and parts of New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts, start- 
ed operations on 1 January 1953. Most 
of the stations included have been 
broadcasting musical programs from 
(Please turn to page 92) 



YOUR 

CHAIN-BREAK'S^ 
STRONGEST 
LINK 




i% 



Spot your chain- 
breaks where heard by 
a billion-dollar market. 
WBNS reaches Central 
Ohio's rich, 24-county area with 
ll/ 4 million folks. WBNS holds 
listeners with top CBS program- 
ming plus popular local shows, 
which make up the 20 top-rated 
programs. Your spot announce- 
ments are heard on WBNS radio! 



ASK JOHN BLAIR 



POWII 

WINS — 5,000 
WE10 FM-53.000 
(01UMIUS. OHIO 



OUTLET 




CENTRAL OHIO'S ONLY 



26 JANUARY 1953 



67 




WAVE-TV 

OFFERS 

HOME-COOKING 

PROGRAM! 



A few topnotch spot partici- 
pations are now available on 
"FLAVOR TO TASTE"- 
WAVE -TV's tremendousl) 
popular home-cooking TV 
program ! 

FORMAT: Now in its fourth 
year, 'FLAVOR TO TASTE" 
is telecast from WAVE-TV \ 
modern, well - equipped 
kitchen. Conducted by charm- 
ing Shirley Marshall with 
how-to-do-it emphasis on 
simple recipes, and attractive, 
economical menus. 

SHIRLEY MARSHALL: Person- 
able, pleasant — Louisville's 
top "cooking expert". College 
degree in home economics, 
and a well-known instructor 
on the subject. 

AUDIENCE: Big, loyal, en- 
thusiastic. A single mention 
of one day's menu drew 4SC> 
requests ! 

TIME: 12 noon to 12:30, 
Monday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day and Friday — a mouth- 
watering time slot ! 




NBC • ABC • DUMONT 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

FREE & PETERS, Inc. 
Exclusive National Representativei 



68 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 26 January 1953 

(Continued from page 2) 

SAC may issue own contract form 
in film commercial dispute 

Screen Actors Guild officials have indicated this 
will be line of strategy if present contract nego- 
tiations on film commercials with producers and 
agencies break down: An "interim" contract will be 
sent out to producers and agencies covering prices 
and conditions under which SAG members will be per- 
mitted to work. Consensus among industry negotia- 
tors is it will take at least until early February 
for both sides to clear away accumulated antagonisms 
and arrive at workable formulas. One of these road- 
blocks is agency insistence that commercials used 
for spot and network be paid for on same basis. 

Radio rates best with FTC 
in commercial check 

Radio continues to be medium least found fault with 
by commercial checking section of FTC. In October 
1952 report of FTC, last to be issued, note is made 
of percentages of total messages in each medium 
which were set aside that month for further inves- 
tigation because of possibility of their being 
"misleading." Here's how they rated: radio, 3.27; 
TV, 3.65; newspapers, 3.81; magazines, 5.11. 

Pittsburgh to get coverage 
from Altoona TV station 

One of several one-station markets which makes life 
difficult for timebuyers is due to loosen up 1 
February when WFBG-TV Altoona, Pa., goes on air. 
Station's signal is expected to give g oo d coverage 
to Pittsb urgh , up to now served exclusively by 
Du Mont's WDTV. New station is VHF on Channel 10 
and will reach maximum power 1 May, Managing Direc- 
tor Jack Snyder told SPONSOR. 

Whitehall buying heavily 
in Spanish-language markets 

Whitehall Pharmacal has moved into Spanish-language 
market in Southwest with mass b uy for first time. 
Campaign involves 13 stations in 10 markets at rate 
of 10 announcements week. Contracts are all for 
26 weeks. J. F. Murray agency handled orders. 
Importance of Spanish-language market is underscored 
in foreign-language radio status report on page 38. 

73 TV markets account for 
73.5% of sets in use 

J. Walter Thompson's "Today's Television Markets" 
study, just released, includes TV set census of 
many important markets not heretofore counted be- 
cause these markets didn't have TV transmitters. 
Study relates only 3 markets with 76 TV stations 
on air today are not included among 162 top mar- 
kets and these 73 markets account for 47% of 
nation's TV homes and 73.6% of sets in use. 

SPONSOR 



IT TAKES 



TO GET 




AND 



WHIO-TV 



HAS IT FOR YOU! 




Here are the salesmen who have what it takes 
to move your product here in the Dayton 
market — where the pay check ranks up with 
the nation's highest, and that ever-lovin' 
folk music keeps it circulating. 

You won't find a higher-powered sales force 
anywhere than our star-studded roundup of 
Ernie Lee, Kenny Roberts, and the Trail 
Hands. See National Representative George 
P. Hollingbery for market data, ratings and 
availabilities. 



DAYTON, OHIO • 




r\ 



hard-selling 
personalities 





Cold Medal Flour 

Renews WDIA, Memphis 

For 3rd Consecutive Year! 

And it Is this continued loyalty of such market-wis? 
national advertisers as Gold Medal Flour that gives 
further proof of WDIA's complete dominance in 
selling to the great Negro segment of the Memphis 
Market (there are 562.212 Negroes in WDIA's 27 
Nielsen counties). Increased sales will prove the 
same for your product. Join the list of blue chip 
accounts that includes Purex. Bayer Aspirin. Arrid. 
Vicks. FAB. Kools. Carnation Milk. Comet Rice, 
Bab-O. and Duz. Get the full WDIA story today. 



HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 
City: Memphis. Tenn. Months: Oct. -Nov. '52 

Time Sets WDIA B C D E F (T 



T.R.T.P. 11.9 23.4 27.2 20.3 13.0 II. I 8.7 4.0 
(Note: WDIA's share Saturdays: 21.4: Sundays: 35.3) 



MEMPHIS 



WDIA 



TENN. 



Represented by : John E. Pearson Co. 
Dora-Clayton Agency, Southeast 



I The swing | 
I is to | 

WHB 

/;/ Kansas City 



WHB 



10,000 Watts day 
5,000 Watts night 
710 Kilocycles 

M utiHil N( I a in I 



Ask your John Blair man 
Don Davis, 1'rcsidcnl 



FOREIGN-LANGUAGE RADIO 

' [Continued from paiie 40 i 

According to WSBC. Chicago, the 
liig nationality figures in that city are: 
Polish, 720.000: German. 700.000; 
Jewish. 430.000; Italian. 375.000; Swe- 
dish. 220.000; Czech-Slovak. 200,000. 

There are large Polish. Italian, and 
German groups in the Detroit area with 
WJLB estimating them at 360,000. 
125.000. and 190.000. Polish groups 
are prominent in Buffalo and Pitts- 
burgh. Philadelphia is an important 
foreign-language market, too. 

.411 languages gain: While the big 
increase in national advertising interest 
is in the Texas Spanish market, sta- 
tions catering to a variety of languages 
have reported a similar pickup. Here 
are some examples: 

WHOM, New York: With heavy Po- 
lish and German programing as well 
as Spanish, national billings in 1952 
are up 60', over 1951. Vice President 
Charles Baltin reports 25 "key" na- 
tional accounts, two-thirds of whom 
were not represented two years ago. 
Accounts include beer and airlines as 
well as RCA-Victor records, Carolina 
rice. Red Cross salt. 

WHOD, Homestead-Pittsburgh: Sta- 
tion broadcasts in 10 foreign lan- 
guages. Station Manager Leonard 
Walk says the increase in national ac- 
counts is shifting the balance from 
one of local to national predominance. 

WSBC. Chicago: Broadcasting in 
eight languages, this station reports 
that during the past few years, "there 
has been a definite increase in the use 
of this medium by national accounts." 

WWRL, New York: During 1952 
there was a "substantial" increase in 
national business, according to Selvin 
Donneson, sales manager. New nation- 
al accounts include Schaeffer. Rhein- 
gold, and Piel beers, all of whom aim 
at the German market; Feen-a-mint, 
4- Way Cold Tablets. 

WLIB. New York: Aiming at New 
York City's big Jewish group as well 
as the Polish bloc, the station has reg- 
istered a 20' '< increase in business 
from national accounts during the past 
two years. 

\ number ol big I .S. advertisers, in- 
cluding P&G, have been around Span- 
ish radio in the southwesl U.S. for a 
number of \cars. Makers of evaporat- 
ed milk have been particularry faith- 



ful, having struck gold with their prod- 
uct among the Spanish because of its 
low price in comparison with bottled 
milk. Carnation is believed to be the 
biggest national advertiser in Spanish 
Texas, using such stations as KTXN. 
Austin; KCOR and KIWW. San An- 
tonio; XEO. Matamoros-Brownsville: 
XEOR, Reynosa-McAllen; XEAS, Nue- 
vo Laredo-Laredo; XEJ. Ciudad Jua- 
rez-El Paso, and KLVL. Houston. 
Camel and Old Gold. 4-Wa> Cold Tab- 
lets and Bromo-Quinine are also among 
the "veterans," comparatively speak- 
ing. P&G now sells seven of its prod- 
ucts through Spanish programing in 
the southwest U.S. 

A large number of blue chip prod- 
ucts have entered the field only since 
July 1951, however. Among them are 
Chesterfield and Luck\ Strike ciga- 
rettes. P&Gs Dreft and Joy. Colgate's 
Fab and Vel, Lever's Breeze, Wildroot 
Cream Oil. Lydia Pinkham, Cantav 
soap, Charles Antell, Manischewilz and 
Virginia Dare wines, Feen-a-mint. 
Fleischmann's Yeast. A compilation by 
National Time Sales lists 90 national 
accounts using Spanish radio in the 
southwest U.S. during 1952. In Fres- 
no. Spanish announcer Juan Mercado 
of IvGST has 11 national accounts on 
his programs, the station said. KWKW. 
Pasadena, reported an increase among 
major food advertisers and added the 
comment that many national advertis- 
ers feel they are striking virgin markets 
with foreign-language radio. 

Research picture incomplete: The 

research story in foreign-language ra- 
dio goes something like this: As the 
stations get more advertisers, the) can 
afford more research; as they use more 
research, they get more advertisers. 

While the foreign-language radio 
market is not nearly as well researched 
as the over-all predominantly English 
market, the foreign-language stations 
have been becoming more research- 
conscious. As pointed out above, re- 
search is often a mailer of what a for- 
eign-language station can afford. But 
as these stations have been moving up 
into the more classy national advertis- 
ing circles, the) have found that the 
national advertisers and their agencies 
have demanded specific data from the 
stations to back up their selling presen- 
tations. The blue sk\ claims just won t 
go toda) . 

Still, most of the solid research has 
been limited. There have been Pulse 



7 (J 



SPONSOR 



Business is 




^tmr 




in Detroit 



MARKET- wise, Detroit is the sweetest sales- territory in 
the U.S.A. That was true in '52 . . . and if'// continue 
to be in '53. The rhythmic music of machinery in action, 
of men at work, of cars and trucks and tanks rolling off 
production lines, of money changing hands, of clinking 
coins and ringing tills . . . all blend into a "hum sweet 
hum" of 4V4 billion dollars retail business annually . . . 
in a market where hourly and weekly earnings of fac- 
tory workers are at an all-time peak. 

MEDIA-wise, you can make your sales hum in this 
market by spotting or programming your campaign on 
WW J, Detroit's NBC affiliate. For 33 years, WWJ has 
been first in programming, in public services, and in 
getting results for its advertisers. 

MONEY-wlse, you can buy WWJ for 14.5% LESS than 
the average cost-per-thousand listeners for radio time 
in Detroit. 

MERCHANDISING-wise, WWJ offers a follow-through 
service, from distributor to dealer levels, to help keep every- 
one humming about your advertising program on WWJ. 

MAKE '53 a humdinger. Put more "se//" into your 
Detroit campaign by putting more of your ad money 
into WWJ. 



JEW 



AM-9J0 KILOCYCLES-5000 WATTS 

FM-CHANNEL 246-97.1 MEGACYCLES 



THE WORLD'S FIRST RADIO STATION 
Owned and Operated by THE DETROIT NEWS 




Assoc/ofe 
| Uleviiion Station WWJ-TV 



National Representatives: THE GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



26 JANUARY 1953 



71 



and Advertest studies in New York 
City and helpful data on four Spanish 
markets in the southwest U.S. Accord- 
ing to one source familiar with the 
Spanish research picture, the data on 
these four markets are the only re- 
liable radio material available on the 
Spanish Southwest. Three of the mar- 
kets. Austin. San Antonio, and Har- 
lingen. were studied bv Joe Belden & 
Associates. Los Angeles was researched 
by Cooper. Coffin & Clav. Pulse and 
Advertest have made periodic rating 
studies in New York City and Pulse 
has also made pantry studies, sponsor 
was told that foreign-language radio 
rating studies ou'side New York City 
have been hampered by the lack of bi- 



lingual interviewers in certain markets. 

There have been sporadic foreign- 
language rating studies outside New 
York City. Pulse did one on Italian 
listening in Detroit for WJLB, for ex- 
ample. Where the foreign-language au- 
dience is included in the over-all lis- 
tening picture, the lack of bi-lingual 
interviewers ofien results in playing 
('own the foreign-language market po- 
tential, many foreign-language stations 
feel. 

The Belden surveys have not provid- 
ed actual rating figures, but indicate 
stronglv that the Spanish population in 
Texas does most of its radio listening 
to Spanish programs. For example, in 
San Antonio Spanish-speaking families 



"And Now ... A Word 
About Our Sponsors" 




WREN SALES 
UP 15 PER CENT 



• More listeners for more 
hours than any other sta- 
tion in Topeka. 

• Year-in, year-out survey 
leader by every recognized 
source. 

• More local advertising dol- 
lars than any other Topeka 
station. 



No increase in sales force . . . 
no increase in rates ... no 
more hours in the day. 
WREN's constant rise in sales 
can only be attributed to an 
expanding market and proved 
sales results for more adver- 
tisers. 




ABC 
TOPEKA 



WEED & 
COMPANY 



were asked which radio station the\ 
listened to most. The two Spanish sta- 
tions, KCOR and KIWW, garnered 
66 ( J of the votes together. The third 
ranking station, an independent Eng- 
lish-language outlet, rated first in 11% 
of the homes. The Spanish stations 
likewise rate high in questions on pref- 
erence. 

An important time buying executi\c 
in New York City, however, told spon- 
sor questions on preference and popu- 
larity between English and Spanish 
radio are not useful unless specific sta- 
tion figures — in other words, ratings — 
can be gathered. His view touches what 
is considered by many to be the weak- 
est link in foreign-language radio's 
chain of sales evidence: 

"No matter how an advertiser feels 
about the effectiveness of foreign-lan- 
guage radio,'' he said, "he really 
doesn't know exactly what he is get- 
ting in the way of an audience in many 
cases. And, until he gets the figures, 
there will always be a question in bis 
mind about whether he is getting the 
most out of his advertising dollar." 

The pantry surveys in New- York 
City and Texas point up the fact that, 
with some exceptions, the national 
brands that are most popular with the 
English-speaking market are also pop- 
ular with the foreign-language market. 
For example, in New York City a prune 
juice that was found by Pulse in 19% 
of non-Italian homes was found in 
18.8' < of Italian homes. When it comes 
to Italian-type foods, however, the 
"Italian'' brands are well ahead in Ital- 
ian homes. In Austin, relative sales 
figures of rice, soap, cigarettes, syrup, 
macaroni, toothpaste, soup, baby foods, 
starch, and other products were almost 
identical in Spanish-speaking and non- 
Spanish-speaking homes, according to 
a KTXN survey. The major differ- 
ences were in cooking ingredients such 
as flour, baking powder, shortening. 

The methods in getting foreign-lan- 
guage market data and listening rat- 
ings are more complicated in some 
ways than the general market studies. 
Advertest put months of study into the 
radio rating problem and came up with 
these answers before going ahead for 
WHOM: 

'• Before an accurate sample can be 
made, there must be careful field work 
to determine exactly where the foreign- 
language groups live. 

'*• To overcome the natural reluc- 
tance to rcph. questioning must be 



72 



SPONSOR 



conducted by interviewers who speak 
the foreign language well. 

3. The question must be carefully 
phrased so that the person interviewed 
understands exactly what is asked or 
answers with information that is usa- 
ble. (In attempting to find out about 
listening habits, it might be better, for 
example, to ask about specific pro- 
grams rather than specific time seg- 
ments.) 

4. Interviewing only one member of 
the household is not sufficient, since 
language listening among different gen- 
erations is highly individualized. 

TV no problem: The fact that many 
foreign-language stations have been 
getting their biggest slices of national 
business at a time of rapid TV growth 
is proof to these stations that TV is no 
menace. Here are the reasons why for- 
eign-language stations minimize the 
video medium: 

'• Foreign-language programing on 
TV is practically imperceptible. XELD- 
TV, Matamoros-Brownsville, represents 
the peak of foreign-language program- 
ing in the U.S. with two hours of Span- 
ish shows daily. WOR-TV, New York. 
presents an Italian film every Saturday 
with Italian commercials and English 
titles. WPIX, New York, goes after 
the Italian market with a program 
called Opera Cameos. However, while 
"Italian" products are advertised, the 
commercials are in English. WBKB. 
Chicago, also has Italian films. Manv 
foreign-language broadcasters have ap- 
plied for TV permits, however. 

2. Many foreign-language stations 
broadcast only during the day when 
TV audiences are generally low. Those 
who broadcast at night say that, while 
there has been a little drop in listening 
because of TV, they have not been af- 
fected nearly as much as English radio. 

3. Foreign-language radio has bene- 
fited from TV in two ways, according 
to foreign-language broadcasters. TV 
has cut up radio's audience into TV 
and non-TV areas and by doing this 
has made the advertiser more conscious 
of his individual markets, not only geo- 
graphically, but culturally. In addi- 
tion, many medium-size advertisers 
have found TV too rich for their blood 
and have turned to a spot radio ap- 
proach, including foreign-language. 

Selling in the native tongite: The 

advertisers who have gone into for- 
eign-language radio in recent years 



have not found selling to be any par- 
ticular mystery. But they have discov- 
ered that while basic advertising ap- 
peals are successful with almost any 
group, there is a certain amount of 
know-how and knowledge necessary to 
sell the foreign-language market. I For 
previous sponsor articles on selling via 
foreign-language radio, see "They love 
their native tongue;* 27 March 1950; 
"How to win with Juan,"' 4 June 1951, 
and "Foreign language radio," in Spot 
radio section, 14 July 1952.) 

Here are some basic facts about for- 



eign-language programing and selling: 
'• The program personality is still 
the heart of foreign-language radio. 
lie is trusted b\ ln~ listeners and this 
makes his commercials believable. His 
selling i- geneialK lnu-ke\ and neigh- 
borly. Partly, this is 1 ecause he acts 
as a friend to his listeners but advertis- 
ers with experience in the foreign-lan- 
guage field know that machine-gun-like 
commercial style so often used on Eng- 
lish radio does not come across effec- 
tively in other tongues. 

2. If the program personalis is the 




No. 41 OF A SERIES 



' ORIGINAL CELTICS 

In Basketball - 



WHEC 

In Rochester Radio! 



l0 ne pMt 



tOttM*? 



IN ROCHESTER 432 weekly quarter hour periods are 
Pulse surveyed and rated. Here's the latest score,— 



STATION 

WHEC 

FIRSTS 254. . 

TIES 7. . 



STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION 

B C D E F 

.147 22 2 

5. . . . 1 1 



WHEC carries ALL of the "top ten" daytime shows! 
WHEC carries NINE of the "top ten" evening shows! 

LATEST PULSE REPORT BEFORE CLOSING TIME 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 





■ II ■ BHH ^1 ^^^01 NEW YORK 

llll ^^ 5,000 WATTS 



/representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. New York. Chicago, LEE F. OCONNELL CO.. los Ange/es, San Francisco 



26 JANUARY 1953 



73 



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My, how you've grown! 




PEOPLES DRUG STORES 
SALES FORGE AHEAD 

When we tell you that WWDC makes 
businesses grow, we're not just talking 
platitudes. We give facts, figures, names 
and addresses to prove what we say. 

Take Peoples Drug Stores, for example. 
They started on WWDC in October, 1950. 
The sales of this great retail organization 
have gone steadily up ever since. In Octo- 
ber, 1951, sales were up $115,169 over 
October, 1950. And October, 1952, showed 
a gain of $332,806 over October, 1951. Bill 
Murdock, head of the William D. Mur- 
dock Agency, says: "Our WWDC news- 
casts have definitely helped Peoples Drug 
Stores sales in the Washington area." 
CLAYTON R. SANDERS, Adv. Manager of 
Peoples Drug Stores, says: "We've used 
WWDC consistently for more than two 
years. We've gotten very good results." 

WWDC can help your sales in the 
Washington area too. Let your John Blair 
man give you the whole story. 

In Washington, D.C. — it's 

WWDC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



heart of foreign-language radio, music 
is its backbone. It is economical, for 
one thing, but as one foreign-language 
expert put it. "Music creates a power- 
ful televisual image for the listener as 
it reminds him of his home country 
and emphasizes the comfort and secur- 
ity of his culture in a foreign land." 
Italians like opera music, Mexicans de- 
vour "ranchero" music, which is equiv- 
alent to U.S. Western tunes. The Polish 
go for polkas. Liturgical music is pop- 
ular with many Jewish listeners. 

3. There are other ways besides mu- 
sic programing to provide the listener 
with a link to his home and culture. 
One of the most successful programs on 
WOV. a popular Italian language sta- 
tion in New York City, is La Grande 
Familia, sponsored by Uddo and Taor- 
mina for their Progresso brand foods. 
By sending in proof-of-purchase evi- 
dence, the listener can include the 
name of a relative in Italy from whom 
he would like to hear. The WOV Rome 
studio staff contacts the relative and 
records a message to be broadcast later 
in New York. The heavy response 
caused the advertiser to raise the proof 
of purchase figure from $2 to $10 and 
increase the program from 15 to 30 
minutes daily. 

Angled news is another important 
program feature. WOV subscribes to 
an Italian news service. WWRL, New 
York, which broadcasts in 14 foreign 
languages, has tie-ups with many for- 
eign-language newspapers. Bullfight 
reports are a staple Spanish news item 
in the southwest U.S. 

4. New advertisers in foreign-lan- 
guage radio would be smart to check 
on best listening times for reaching 
their foreign-language audience. They 
are not always the same as over-all 
listening figures. The Belden studies 
for KCOR and KTXN showed that the 
Spanish-speaking sets-in-use figure was 
relatively high in the early morning. 
relatively low during "siesta" time. 

;*• Dramas, soap operas are popular 
with foreign-language groups but must 
be more red-blooded, more tragic. P&G. 
which has been advertising via an- 
nouncements in the Rio Grande area 
for six \ears. recently bought its first 
program. It is a Spanish soap opera 
on six Spanish stations. P&G bought 
it alter giving up the idea <>l making 
over one of their English shows. Right 
to Happiness, into a Spanish version. 
I nlike Kngli.-h l\|>«'s. Spanish soap op- 
eras do not go on and on. The ston 



is usually wrapped up in 60 episodes 
after which a new : group of characters 
is presented. P&G will use the same 
name for all its stories, however, be- 
cause it is easier to merchandise. While 
comedy programs are not too com- 
mon, a situation-comedy show, Pas- 
quale, C.O.D.. is being broadcast suc- 
cessfully on WOV and WHOD. 

*»• All foreign-language stations 
translate commercials from English 
free. While some big agencies do their 
own translations, foreign-language 
broadcasters warn that there are many 
pitfalls. The translation cannot be too 
literal, or it will sound awkward. In 
the southwest U.S. there are different 
dialects in different areas. 



"Business should sell its ideas to con- 
sumers through ihe use of paid adver- 
tising rather than propaganda. The ap- 
proach should be similar to that used 
in selling products while maintaining 
the highest degree of integrity." 

FAIRFAX M. CONE 

President 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

• ••••••• 

Here is what station KALI. Pasade- 
na, says about translating English into 
Spanish commercials: 

"It is often necessary to check copy- 
ideas before writing what we might 
term 'cute or catchy' commercials be- 
cause English phrases or traditional 
sayings so often used as leader copy 
ideas are not always translatable — or, 
if they are, the impact of the idea is 
lost in translation. In translating, an- 
other peculiarity is making the Span- 
ish copy forceful enough — as compared 
to the rather flowery English verbose 
flow of words. The Spanish copy tends 
at times to turn out too matter-of-fact 
— without any window dressing to give 
the copy appeal." 

7. Programs of a religious nature 
often have a very strong impact. A 
large percentage of dramatic shows 
over WJMJ. Philadelphia (Italian, Jew- 
ish. Irish, and Polish programs I have 
religious themes. For instance, the 
lives of national saints are dramatized. 
WJLB, Detroit, which beams programs 
at 10 nationalities, presents The Ros- 
ary Hour, a program for the Roman 
Catholics in Detroit's great Polish pop- 
ulation. 

S. The foreign-language groups tend 
lo buy the large sizes of products. They 
do this for two reasons: I 1 I they have 
lar«c families, and (2) the large sizes 



are economic 



al. 



74 



SPONSOR 



JUST LIKE HAVING 

ACES 



BACK TO BACK 




George Ruge 



KYA KOFFEE KLUB 



Ramblin Jimmie Do/an 



6-9 A.M. 



SHOW 
9 - 12 NOON 



The San Francisco Bay Area y s 
Hardest Hitting Selling Combination On 



Represented Nationally by 
GEORGE W. CLARK. INC. 



KYA 



SAN 
FRANCISCO 



26 JANUARY 1953 



75 



&° 



M 



i 



WITH 
SAN ANTONIO 

THE NATION'S FASTEST 
CROWING MAJOR CITY 




More than 50% oj the population of the San 
Antonio area speaks Spanish. K(,OR reaches 
best, a 4.5 county market of 691, 493 Spanish- 
speaking people — a market larger than the 
city oj Pittsburgh. 

. . . Write for the new lielilen Survey, just being 
published^— shuurs listening preference— buying 
fnu*r— brand preferences . . . 

or contact representatives: 

Richard O'Connell—40 East 49th St., 

Neiv York 

Harlan G. Onkes & Associates 

West Coast and Chicago 

Texas' First and Most Powerful 
Spanish Language Station 

KCOR Building, 310 South Flores St. 
San Antonio, Texas 



9. Foreign-language stations find 
programing of a "public service" na- 
ture strikes a responsive chord among 
their listeners. Some of the most suc- 
cessful responses among listeners have 
been to appeals for help. WALT, Tam- 
pa, makes appeals frequently. WOV 
and WJMJ received heavy contribu- 
tions from their Italian audiences fol- 
lowing appeals for victims of the Po 
Valley flood in Italy. 

Future trentls: The problem that has 
always faced foreign-language stations 
is the inevitable fact that immigrants 
and their descendants will in time 
learn English and forget their mother 
tongues. Yet, although immigra'ion 
quotas have been imposed by the U.S. 
since 1921, foreign-language stations 
have shown a lusty refusal to give up 
the ghost. How come? 

Foreign-language groups tend to 
have large families, for one thing, and 
many second and third generation 
Americans retain a sympathy for the 
culture of their parents and speak both 
languages well. For another thing, fol- 
lowing World War II the Displaced 
Persons Act of 1948 allowed 300.000 
immigrants to enter in three years. 

Although there is no evidence so far 
that anything will be done about it, 
the attack on the McCarran-Walter Act 
bv President Truman's Commission on 
immigration and Naturalization on 1 
Tanuarv ursed that the act be revised 
"from beginino: to end." The Commis- 
sion was particularly concerned with 
what it considered the discriminatory 
nuotas for aliens ou'side northwestern 
Eurone. It urged a unified auota svs- 
tem of 251.162 as comnar^d with 154.- 
657 under the present law. 

One evidence of foreign-language ra- 
dio's adaptability to change is the 
grea'er appearance of bi-lingual pro- 
graming or English programing direct- 
ed at specific cultural groups. Some 
Italian dramas have the older genera- 
tion cneaHng Ttalia^ and 'he vounger 
speaking English. WEVD. New York, 
broadcasts Spanish and English ver- 
sions of the same announcements. 
WMGM. New York, has an Anglo-Jew- 
ish music urogram an hour long, while 
WLIB, New York, also goes in for a 
pronounced Anglo-Jewish approach. 

A big percent of the foreign-lan- 
guage market is bi-lingual. Some ad- 
vertisers consider this as evidence that 
this mar 1 el can be reached I>\ English 
rpdio alone. Ru* WOV points out to 
advertisers that 959? of the 2.100.000 



^:n[llllintl!lllllllll!nilllllllll!;il!!!lllll!;l!lllll!!l>llll!l!llllll!!l!):!lllll!lll|i|llll!nil!lllll!lllllllllll!lllllll^' 



WWRL 



Selling America's 

GREATEST 

Foreign-Language 

Market— at the 

Lowest Cost 



WWRL powerfully delivers your 
sales message to New York's mil- 
lions of foreign-language listen- 
ers . . . in the native tongue they 
understand . . . using the lop for- 
eign-language announcer person- 
alities on the best loved language 
programs in New York. 

WWRL Broadcasts in 
more Foreign-Languages 
than any other 
New York station, 



WWRL is the No. 1 station to 
effectively, yet inexpensively, 
reach these New York groups: 

SPANISH GREEK 

GERMAN LITHUANIAN 

CZECHOSLOVAK SYRIAN 

HUNGARIAN RUSSIAN 

POLISH UKRANIAN 



WWRL offer-: 

• Merchandising Promotion 

• More Foreign-Languaqe Newspapers 
Tie-Ups Than Any Other NY Station 

• Best Foreign-Language Shows 

• Top-Announcer-Personalities 

a 5 000 Watts Beamed Through 
Metropolitan New York 



W-ite. call for Pu!«e R«T>-ts 

pnd a survey on Now v o-k's 

Fo-e'"n-Lansuafe '"'tience 

N c '«'(i'vn 9-'*"0 

WWRI.. Win^iHo 77. N. Y. 



NEW YORK 



..iiliiiiiiiilllilillilllillillilliiiilil'liilliiiiiiliiiiiii'iiii '"■ :''.'- ' r;ii! ^ 



76 



SPONSOR 




26 JANUARY 1953 



77 



persons in the metropolitan i\ew York 
Cits Italian-language market under- 
stands English and still the station uet> 
an average Pulse ratina in Italian 
homes ol 10.2. 

And listen to Eddie Rodriguez, who 
with his brother, Pete, bills the two 
as "'Spanish appeal" specialists and 
presents the daily Buenos Dias pro- 
grams on KV\ D, Los Angeles: 

"The Los Angeles "Spanish-speaking" 
market, which comprises the second 
largest Mexican city in the world, is 
bi-lingual. Our audiences are chock- 
full of I .S.-born Americans of Mexi- 



can origin, who have finished Ameri- 
can schooling or service in the armed 
forces, are working with mixed groups, 
living in mixed neighborhoods . . . 
all using English. . . 

"So, we do our six commercial hours 
in a bi-lingual. informal, chatty style." 

While the time may come when for- 
eign languages will be extinct in the 
I .S.. neither the foreign-language sta- 
tions nor the advertisers are particular- 
Is concerned about the future. Right 
now is what counts. And by all appear- 
ances, right now counts pretty well in 
foreign-language radio. * * * 




E S 



S E A T T L E 

YAKIMA 



Certainly Seattle is a solid cinch for a 
place high on every national schedule. 
Of the sixty major metropolitan market 
areas, Seattle is normally, recognized as 
the "key city" in the Pacific Northwest. 

But equally important to the successful 
campaign are prime secondary markets 
removed from and unaffected by the key 
city media. After Seattle — take Yakima, 
Washington. 

Yakima offers the national advertiser a 
particularly choice secondary buy. For 
here is a multi-million dollar agricultural 
area strategically centering a multi-bil- 
lion dollar electric and atomic power in- 
dustry. All of which makes it an increas- 
ingly desirable secondary market of first 
importance in the West. 

YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 



KIT 



NBC 



ABC 



KYAK 



MBS 



THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



GEORGE W. CLARK 



K II M A* • > 

WEED AND COMPANY 



MOCEN DAVID 

I Continued from page 30 ) 

Bill Cullen. Louis Untermeyer. Guests 
included Kim Hunter. Yankee Pitcher 
Ed Lopat. Eva Gabor. ex-Senator Wil- 
liam Benton. Lauritz Melchior. Victor 
Borge. Linda Christian. Lilv Pons, and 
Jackie Robinson. 

The show consists of guessing the 
who, what, and where of a picture 
flashed behind the panel's backs. The 
picture is always supplied by the guest. 
Mrs. America was shown fainting. Ed 
Lopat was taken in the shower. Sena- 
tor Benton stood by the Popes chair. 
Harold Rome, who wrote the music 
and lyrics for Wish You Were Here, 
Broadway hit, was in a pool with 18 
beauties. And Kim Hunter was in 
Humphrey Bogart's arms. Mike 1 hit- 
ton is the producer. 

Of TV Henry Markus says, "Were 
sold on TV because we can show the 
audience the product and talk about it 
at the same time. This visual and audi- 
tory impact makes it twice as effective 
as any other medium. In addition \ou 
can give the audience a different mes- 
sage every week of the year." 

However, Mogen David will switch 
from network TV to spot TV after 
Where Was 1 runs out in June, accord- 
ing to preliminary plans discussed in 
January. Network radio will also be 
stressed to widen coverage. Reason for 
the switch, according to Mann: "In 
buying network TV. it is necessarv to 
buy too many markets that are not 
important or worth the expenditure." 

At sponsor's press time Mann was 
in New York trying to sign either Ed- 
die Cantor or The Goldbergs over NBC 
Radio. In addition to the above, the 
company is also using spot radio in 30 
markets, dailies in 150 markets, a large 
outdoor schedule that includes painted 
walls in 13 cities and spectaculars in 
St. Louis. Detroit. Memphis, and Mil- 
waukee, and point-of-sale advertising 
in states in which it has distribution. 

Barbara Gaudietz of the Irvin Myer- 
son Agency, Chicago, which is han- 
dling outdoor for Mogen David, wrote 
SPONSOR: "The estimated outdoor ad- 
vertising appropriation is $300,000. 
We feel that through the years this me- 
dium, along with newspapers and ra- 
dio, has popularized Mogen David 
Wine and helped that product to at- 
tain the success which enabled it to 
enter the television advertising held. 
We think it would not at all be inap- 
propriate for your article to give out- 



/8 



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Chicago 1, I llinois 
360 North Michigan 
The Walker Company 



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The highest Television Station in the Pacific Northwest 

KXLY-TV 

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■door advertising and the other media 
their full share of credit in helping to 
write the 'Mogen David Wine Success 
Stor\ . 

Sail's: Weiss & Geller's Marvin Mann 
ranks the Concord grape wines by sales 
standings as follows: (1) Mogen Da- 
vid. (2) Manischewitz, made by Mon- 
arch Wine, (3) Welch's of New York 
(a non-kosher wine which is distrib- 
uted by Quality Importers, Inc.). Wal- 
ter C. Elly, Eastern advertising manag- 
er of Wine Publications, agrees with 
him. but the Welch and Monarch Wine 
people disagree. Meyer H. Robinson, 
Monarch Wine's secretary-treasurer 
and sales manager (see "Mr. Sponsor," 



SPONSOR, 2 July 1951), is positive that 
Manischewitz wine is first. Quality Im- 
porters says Manischewitz is first, 
Welch second, and Mogen David third 
nationally, but undisputed first in Chi- 
cago. 

In any case, figures from Mogen 
David and other sources indicate it 
leads the parade in many markets, as 
follows: 

In Pennsylvania 8,561 cases of Mo- 
gen David were sold in November 
1952, as compared with only 584 ca-es 
in the first half of September 1951. 
Mogen David is first among wines in 
the Keystone State, Mann says. In 
Michigan Mogen David rose from 18th 
in 1948 among wines under 16% alco- 



More and More People 

are tuning to channel O . . . 



,*>w 



?\cs 



6 



5 



r 



v*% i 



^ i 



Channel 6 



LTV 



V 



COLUMBUS OHIO 



-. : 



TOP LOCAL PROGRAMS in COLUNhWS 

PLUS mil 

ff>W * £>"■ v v& fife ■ 

ABC-DUMONT 

iL 
y WTVI 



>«>< COfcUMBUS, OHIO 

<l\ ' 





National Representative 
HeadleyReed Co. 



Edward I l/ jf A l\ l ; ; Enterprise 



N.w York Office— Hofcf Barclay —Horn* Offic* — 500 Security Bldg., Ultdo, Ohio 



hol to first in 1952. In Indiana one out 
of every 10 bottles of all wine sold is 
Mogen David. In Nebraska, 40.7% of 
all table wines sold is M.D.; in Wis- 
consin, it's 40.5% ; in Missouri, 
32.3%; in Texas, 13.8%. In Omaha, 
the Omaha World Herald found Mogen 
David's popularity among consumers 
had risen from 2.17% in 1949 to 
62.7 r '( . And in Ohio sales increased 
by 657c to 102,181 gallons the first 
five months of 1952 over the same pe- 
riod in 1951, as against 24,564 gallons 
of Welch's sold (down 47 % ) and 22,- 
156 gallons of Monarch (up 28%). 

Mogen David sold some 3.3 million 
gallons at $1.50 a gallon in 1952 for a 
gross of about $5 million. And get 
this: The price, $7.55 a case of 12 
quarts (to wholesalers) hasn't changed 
for nine straight years. This price per- 
mits the wholesaler a good mark-up 
and a reasonable profit — a vital factor 
in plugging any line. 

In comparison California wines sell 
for as low as 32 1 / 1 >(* a gallon to whole- 
salers and fluctuate as much as 100% 
during the year. 

Psychiatry sells tvine: How does 
psychiatry enter into selling Mogen 
David? It was Ed Weiss' idea. The 
Weiss & Geller president has been in- 
terested in the subject since he ma- 
jored in sociology at the University of 
Chicago (Ph.B., 1922). His agency 
has made an intensive study of how 
social sciences can help advertisers un- 
cover the consumer's real feelings and 
buying motives. (Ask Ed sometime to 
tell you his theory on why little men 
buy big nowerful motor cars.) He says 
of Mogen David: 

"It's a sweet Concord grape wine 
with sugar added and only 14% alco- 
hol by volume. It's different from the 
regular California and French import- 
ed wines. We knew we had to find an 
entirely new copy platform, different 
from the conventional approaches that 
had long been used in wine advertising. 

"First we consulted the social sci- 
entists and from them came many 
ideas, but there was one in particular 
that stood out in almost every discus- 
sion we had. Here are excerpts from 
some of these interviews that reveal 
this point: 

"One psychologist said: 'Wine is re- 
lated to festive childhood memories, to 
early family closeness and gaiety.' A 
woman psychiatrist said: 'The tradi- 
tional aspect of yvine should be played 
up as something that knits the family 



80 



SPONSOR 



together.' A male psychoanalyst add- 
ed: 'This carries all the connotations of 
a festive holiday in which the making 
of special foods as well as wine by 
mother is stressed'." 

Psychological depth interviews among 
consumers corroborated this. 

"We quickly realized the copy themes 
that would set this mood would have 
to be a doorway to the pleasant world 
of yesterday," Weiss says. "Some of 
the themes were: 'A taste of the good 
old days.' 'Mogen David wine — the 
home-sweet-home wine that Grandma 
used to make'." 

Weiss says the copy themes have 
been used in print and on the air for 
two years. During this time Mogen 
David has climbed to the top in its 
class. "Its national sales were doubled 
and in territory after territory where 
this copy approach was introduced in 
television, radio, newspaper, and out- 
door, Mogen David has risen from as 
low as 18th place to first in wine sales." 

Mogen David TV commercials for 
the Where Was I show are written by 
Weiss & Geller A/E and newly appoint- 
ed V.P. Byron Bonnheim. Cheri Lee. 

Mogen David's history: It's been 



19 years since President Max Cohen 
and Vice President Henry Markus re- 
deemed Mrs. Cohen's jewels on which 
they'd borrowed $1,500 to help start 
their own wine bottling company. It 
was called California Wine Co. at the 
time, became the Wine Corp. of Amer- 
ica in 1946. The firm began making its 
own wine in 1940. 

Mogen David made its debut about 
1940 as a sacramental kosher wine. 
The name means Shield of David or 
the six-pointed star of Israel (now 
used on the flag of Israel) . Cohen and 
Markus chose the name to appeal to 
the Jewish consumer. Once the brand 
began to roll in the late 1940's, the 
name not only proved no handicap in 
the non-Jewish field, but when they 
tried to modernize the design on the 
bottles, consumers protested. 

During the war the company had to 
switch from Concord grapes to Bar- 
loma Red and White wine made of 
California grapes when Concords and 
sugar became scarce. In 1946 Cohen 
and Markus resumed making (but not 
advertising) Mogen David. How did 
it catch on so suddenly? 

Markus relates how he discovered on 
a trip in 1947 that, although they were 
spending money to advertise Barloma. 



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3 other stations! * 

WDBJ TOTAL WEEKLY AUDIENCE 

Day . . . 110,861 Night . . . 92,186 

and 3 or more days and nights 
Day . . . 92,885 Night . . . 67,743 



Compare 



then call . . . Free & Peters, Inc. 

*Based on SAMS — 1952 



Established 1924 ■ CBS Since 1929 
AM . 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS . 94.9 MC 



ROANOKE, V A- . 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WOULD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS, INC!, National Representatives 



26 JANUARY 1953 




S^ V III 



CON 



«>, 







Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 

In New England — Bertha Banna 



81 




!llllll!!!ll!lllllll Mllllllllillllllllli! Illlllllllllllllllllll!! Illlllllllllilllillliiil IIIIIIIIIIHIIIIII lllllllllllllllllllllll l!!ill!l!!!llll!!il!!!ll lllllllllllllllllllllll! Ill!llll!!||llll|||||||! i 1 



761 E. Grand 

Chicago, Illinois SU 7-9863 



SPONSOR 



How to keep from getting lost 
in NEW YORK or CHICAGO 



Ever wonder whether Aubrey, Finlay, Marley & 
Hodgson was on North Michigan or South W acker'.' 
Ever worry as you pulled out of Grand Central Station 
how many important calls you forgot during your 
three days in New York'/ ft happens to the best of 
us. at the ivor st times. 

Next time you re in New York or Chicago make 
every minute and call count by using SPONSOR'S 1953 
pocket-size, 12-page booklet titled "Radio and TV 
Directory of New York and Chicago." Here you 11 find 
names and addresses, by categories, of key advertisers, 
agencies, stations, networks, news services. 
representatives, TV film services, music and 
transcription services, research firms, hotels. 

We'll be glad to send you a Radio and TV Directory 
on request — with the compliments of the use 
magazine, SPONSOR. 



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The magazine radio and TV advertisers USE 



it was the sweet, heavy-bodied Mogen 
David that restaurants, bars, and drug 
stores were selling and asking for, even 
though it was not getting a perm) of 
the ad budget. 

An analysis of sales showed the same 
picture, so the dumping scene followed 
in which 40,000 gallons of Barloma 
were poured out to make room for 
Mogen David. 

A ko her wine, Mogen David is made 
under the supervision of two Orthodox 
Jewish rabbis. As a result, the giant 
redwood vats in the modern 10,000,- 
000-gallon capacity plant worth $2 mil- 
lion in Chicago must be cleansed seven 
times with hot water. A "special dis- 
pensation" lets the company use steam. 

Now only 3% of total sales are de- 



<*Understanding human motivations in 
relation to a product is essentially the 
same whether you are selling steel 
bridges or women's lingerie; whether 
you are a manufacturer making ready- 
to-serve packaged foods or aspirin tab- 
lets or electrical appliances, the creative 
problem, based on our experience, can 
more readily be solved through a more 
intensive understanding of unconscious 
motivations — ihe real reasons why peo- 
ple buy your product*." 

EDWARD H. WEISS 

President 

Weiss & Geller, Inc. 

Chicago 

******** 

voted to sacramental uses, Roman Cath- 
olic, Episcopalian, and Jewish. 

Mogen David's first full-year ad bud- 
get—in 1947— was $50,000. In 1953 
it will be $1,400,000. During the 1946- 
52 period production rose from 75,000 
gallons to 3.3 million gallons. That's 
why {Vines & Vines calls its rise so 
phenomenal. 

Sidelight: The Wine Corp. of Amer- 
ica winery in Chicago is so modern 
that when Mann was asked how many 
employees it had, he shook his head. 
"I've been down four times and haven't 
seen anyone yet," he joked. Actually 
a total of four men, with the assistance 
of four full-time chemists, handle all 
phases of wine making — fermentation, 
sweetening, blending, clarifying, re- 
frigeration, filtering, aging, preheating, 
and polishing. Packaging and shipping 
departments are also mechanized. 

/tfogen Duvid's competition: Mo- 
gen David's competition is not only 
the other 10 or so kosher wines and nu- 
merous Concord grape wineries. It 
comes from the California wine com- 
panies, who lead the field, and the hard 



liquor and beer people as well. 

For example, America drank 193,- 
800,000 gallons of hard liquor and 2.5 
billion gallons of beer in 1951, as 
against only 126,430,000 gallons of 
wine. This wine figure is down 9.94 ( . 
from the 140,379,000 gallons in 1950 
( 1949 figure was 132,567,000 gall<>n> i . 
Best year in a decade was 1946 with 
140,452,000 gallons. Prewar average 
was 72,078,000 gallons. 

The wineries don't spend much on 
advertising, with only a few excep- 
tions. With 950 bonded wineries and 
350 bonded plants in existence, only 
$1.8 million was spent on magazines 
in 1951, according to the Publishers 
Information Bureau. Yet wine is big 
business by any standard. The Wine 
Publications' Walter Elly estimates the 
wine market is worth $110 million at 
retail, $90 million at wholesale, and 
$60 million at the producers' level. 

To get their share of this market 
here's what three of Mogen David's 
closest competitors are doing in radio 
and television: 

Manisehewitz: The Monarch Wine 
Co., maker of Manischewitz Wine, will 
spend nearly twice as much on adver- 
tising in 1953 — over $2 million — as it 
did in 1952 (over $1,000,000). Of 
this. $750,000 will go into a television 
program for the first time, plus TV an- 
nouncements, $750,000 for spot radio. 
H>'( on transportation in 28 markets, 
and the rest on some general newspa- 
pers before Passover, on Negro publi- 
cations, and on point-of-sale, accord- 
ing to Charles E. Patrick, Donahue & 
Coe's A/E for Monarch Wine. 

Monarch Wine had been primarily 
in spot radio for the past three years. 
Then last fall it tested spot TV. "Re- 
sults were so good we decided to go 
into a half-hour TV film whodunit, the 
George Raft series, / Am the Law, pro- 
duced by Cosman Productions and syn- 
dicated by MCA," Patrick said. "In- 
itially we'll go into six markets — New 
York, Washington, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh, Los Angeles, Detroit — starting 
in February and running for 39 weeks. 
Later we'll try to expand this to 15 or 
16 markets using the best stations and 
availabilities we can get." 

In addition TV announcements will 
be run in other markets. 

In radio, programs and announce- 
ments are scheduled for 175 stations in 
64 markets domestically and six sta- 
tions in Alaska. 



KDYL-TV 

Now 30,000 Watts 
From 8,900 Feet! 






America's most 
powerful channel 4 
television station now 
doubling its market 
area to cover virtually 
all of Utah plus 
Southern Idaho, 
Eastern Nevada and 
Western Wyoming. 







' e *«-fi«. H i 



# "*C *. r* 



ORK 



SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 
National Representative: 
Blair-TV, Inc. 



26 JANUARY 1953 



83 



H'elch's: Qualit) Importers, Inc., dis- 
tributors of \ N > i Ich's Sweet Grape Wine, 
will spend close to $1.2 million in 1953 
—$300,000 in -pot radio and $300,000 
in spot T\ . according to Arthur K. 
Kaufer. director of sales promotion and 
marketing. About 75 radio and 25 
T\ stations were used in 1952. 

'\\ e've made tremendous inroads in- 
to markets which heretofore were ex- 
clusivel) California wine markets," says 
Assistant Advertising Manager Walter 
Heimann. 

Quality Importers will devote about 
00'; of its ad budget in 1953 to air 
advertising, same as last year, the two 
executives said. Programs and an- 
nouncements will be used. Monroe 
Greenthal is the agency and Walter 
Schwartz, Quality Importer's former 
advertising manager, the A/E. 

Temple: Temple Wine, also concen- 
trating on radio and TV in Minnesota, 
leads the field in St. Paul, according to 
a St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press sur- 
vey. Art Gruber, of Art Gruber Asso- 
ciates (Temple's agency) , told SPONSOR: 
"Temple Wine (Mid-West Wine Co.) 
sales go rolling along at a healthier 
rate each year. Today Temple out- 



r 



ACE SECRETARY 

moves to New York 



Chicago's loss may be your 
gain. This advertisement is i 
written on behalf of a top-notch 
secretary who has handled 
correspondence, confidential de- 
tails, and personal matters for 
the busy head of a 50,000 
watt radio station in Chicago 
during the past 20 years. She i 
has just come to New York. 
She will be employed quickly; ' 
she hopes in some important 
segment of the radio and TV i 
advertising field. Her character, 
work habits, and references are I 
outstanding. Write Box 53, 
SPONSOR. 

I 



sells all wines and its nearest competi- 
tor (Mogen David) by approximately 
I 1 - to 1 in this area and is gaining 
ground in other parts of this area. 

"Promotionwise, we are using radio 
spots daily on several stations — with 
adjacencies to women's shows and par- 
ticipations in cooking programs as a 
mainstay. 

"\\ e also use local talent personali- 
ties on TV spots throughout the week 
in addition to Class A half-hour pro- 
grams in peak seasons. 

"Air shows are supplemented by oth- 
er media — billboards, traveling bus and 
streetcar displays, and point-of-sale, but 
radio and TV carry the brunt on a 
year-round schedule." 

The survey Gruber referred to also 
shows that, while Temple climbed from 
seventh to first place since 1948, Mogen 
David rose from 10th to second. 

In any case the Concord grape wine 
companies, kosher or otherwise, are 
betting on radio and TV to get them 
on Mr. and Mrs. America's dinner 
table. 

To date, with national sales declin- 
ing for most other brands, they've suc- 
ceeded remarkably well - - especially 
Max Cohen's and Henry Markus' Mo- 
gen David, of whose phenomenal rise 
Markus says simply: 

"Television and psychiatry did it." 

• • • 



For previous wine article see "Is your class- 
product ripe for mass sales?", sponsor, 23 October 
1950. sponsor thanks the following for helping 
its editors gather material for this article: Walter 
C. Elly, Wine Publications: Legh Knowles, East- 
ern division manager. Wine Advisory Board of 
State of Cat.; Art Gruber, Art Gruber Associates, 
Minneapolis; Meyer H. Robinson, secretary-trea- 
surer and sales manager. Monarch Wine Co.; 
Charles E. Patrick, Donahue S.- Coe A/E for 
Monarch Wine; John Brady Jr., Liquor Publica- 
tions, Inc.; Russell W. Miller, chief, statistics 
division, Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board; Ar- 
thur R. Kaufer, director of sales promotion and 
marketing, and Walter Heimann, assistant adver- 
tising manager. Quality Importers; William S. 
Maulsby, assistant advertising manager, National 
Distillers Corp.; Barbara Gaudietz, Irvin Myerson 
Agency, Chicago; Wine Institute Bulletin; Food 
Engineering; Tile Glass Lining; Wines & Vines; 
The Glass Packer; Advertising Age, as well as 
nllici. ils of Wine Corp. of America and Weiss 8c 
Geller, Chicago. 



SAM-NCS 

I Continued from page 35 

"average."' But, it will g 

useful clue to a station's efficiency. 



average." But. it will give admen a 



4. Program ratings show best 
locations in station schedules: As 

pointed out in the previous paragraph, 
cost-per-l,000-homes-delivered is a use- 
ful buying index. Once having spotted 
a station which delivers sizable audi- 
ences at a good price, the next step is 
to turn to program ratings, such as 
those of Pulse and Hooper. This sim- 
plified process is almost precisely the 
same method used by a space buyer 
who is using readership data to spot 
his best location in print media. 

5. Don't use program ratings 
(unless projeetible ) to determine 
cost-per-l, 000 hotnes: ''Neither 
readership figures nor ratings can be 
legitimately extended against circula- 
tion," Baker points out, "unless the 
sample of homes in which these mea- 
surements are made are representative 
of the entire circulation of the news- 
paper, magazine, or radio station." 

Such a practice of matching ratings 
which aren't projeetible beyond metro- 
politan areas (Hooper, Pulse, Conlan) 
against a station's complete SAM ra- 
dio, circulation figures, Baker feels, 
"may be completely deceptive," and 
can lead to erroneous radio station 
time purchases. 

6. Use great caution in setting 
up "'best buy" levels of coi'erage: 

A hangover from the days when sta- 
tion "coverage" was guessed in terms 
of engineering contours, the idea of 
"levels" of coverage can be misleading. 
"There is no magic in 50% that would 
justify its selection as the boundary 
of a 'primary' area," Baker states. 

"In most measurements of circula- 
tion, the range between 459c and 55% 
must be taken into consideration if 




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84 



SPONSOR 




WSB and WSB-TV provide for advertisers 

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In every survey ever made in Atlanta by 

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If you are interested in big portions 

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Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. Represented by Edw. Petry & Co. Inc. 



26 JANUARY 1953 



85 



Radio Station 



KFMB 



IS 

now 



CBS 



RADIO NETWORK 



in 



San Diego, Calif. 
(550 on Dial) 



John A. Kennedy, Board Chairman 

Howard L. Chcrnoff, Cen. Manager 

Represented by THE BRANHAM CO. 



KWJJ 



"On-theSpat" 

BLANKET COVERAGE 

This new four week plan gives you 175, 
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1011 S.W.6thAve. 

PORTLAND 
OREGON 

Not'l Reps. — WEED & COMPANY 




it s to be assumed that a 'primary" area 
is to include 50% penetration. In some 
measurements, the range may well be 
from 40% to 60%. A timebuyer may 
be making a more serious error 1>\ 
including a 53', county than by 
stretching the area to include a 46' - 
county. If there are 2.000 radio homes 
in the first county and 10,000 radio 
hoines, the station picture becomes dis- 
torted," Raker explains. 

{ 7. .troirl gonvrittiztttions about 
radio in rudio-tvlv vision areas: 

In some areas, TV has produced a sort 
of "doughnut" pattern of radio station 
circulation. In other words, the radio 
listening has sagged in the area cov- 
ered by the TV signals, then picks up 
again sharply outside of TV range. 
This is caused by simple engineering 
phenomena; radio stations generally 
reach out much further than TV out- 
lets, particularly 50 kw. stations. 

However, to assume that this is true 
in every case can be seriously mislead- 
ing. Many radio outlets in TV areas 
who have had no power changes or 
sizable radio home growths in their 
markets since 1949 have lost audience 
— but sometimes it's not entirely due to 
TV. Competition from new radio out- 
lets, a slackening of popularity of a 
radio network, stepped-up promotion 
or merchandising on the part of long- 
time competing stations — all these can 
affect radio stations in TV areas, in 
addition to TV. 

That the popular image of "dough- 
nut" coverage doesn't always apply was 
pointed out by Baker to sponsor in cit- 
ing a typical case. In a large, mid- 
Southern market, the 1949 BMB 
showed that some 92%> of a 50 kw. 
station's coverage was outside of the 
station's home county. Shortly after 
the 1949 BMB study was made, the 
market became an active TV area, and 
the TV set saturation has been growing 
rapidly ever since. Today, the 50 kw. 
station's over-all listening is off about 
20%, according to an SAM-BMB com- 
parison. 

Most admen might guess that the 
audience losses of this station would 
be more of a TV blowout than a slow 
leak, and that the 20%> is a bite out of 
the TV-covered home county and sur- 
rounding area. Such is not the case. 
Today, the station is getting about 
90% of its listening outside of the 
home county, according to SAM. Due 
to statistical sampling variations, this is 
almost the same percentage as shown 



in the 1949 BMB figures. Reason: The 
station is facing up well to TV compe- 
tition, is losing some ground to new 
radio stations in its entire area. 

Certainly, the station has lost some 
20', of its audience. And, it has re- 
cently cut its rates to an equivalent 
amount, to bring rates in line with 
audience. But the loss has been more- 
or-less uniform throughout its cover- 
age area, and the radio advertiser who 
passes up such a station, feeling that 
TV has put the death sign on its home 
county audience, would be making a 
grave mistake. Baker feels. 

8. I seful comparisons can be 
made* ?><-i if '<•<'!• IUIU BMB and 
I».U2 SAM data: The evaluation of 
radio stations in TV markets, as illus- 
trated in the previous paragraph, is 
helped greatly, Baker believes, by the 
fact that the SAM data is comparable 
to the 1949 BMB. This is important 
in charting any kind of trends based 
on radio station circulation. Nielsen 
Coverage Service data, although more 
extensive both in its radio and TV 
circulation reports and in its qualita- 
tive data than SAM, lacks this factor 
of comparability, according to Baker. 

Armed with a list of dates on which 
the major U.S. TV markets became 
active video areas, timebuyers can 
check just how much effect TV has had 
on radio audiences in various lengths 
of time. Also, the 1949 and 1952 re- 
lationships between audience-and-costs 
of radio stations can be compared in 
TV and non-TV areas, and the effects 
of power increases since 1949 can be 
judged. 

Close checking may r well show, in 
some cases, that radio outlets have 
gained audiences between 1949 and 
1952 in the face of stiffer radio and 
TV competition. This will add a use- 
ful extra dimension to the present-day 
knowledge of a station's audience size, 
and aid in judging time purchases. 




86 



SPONSOR 



.9. s i ii (irciiiiiiiiiii tin la can «»<• 
used for other-than-time buying 
purposes: "An agency can be of greal 
service to a client by helping to assign 
advertising costs properly to distribu- 
torships, sales territories, and the like. 
Already, several agencies have had spe- 
cial decks of SAM punched cards cre- 
ated which contain station circulation 
data and the distribution data of sev- 
eral of their clients. It thus becomes 
a simple matter to help a client to allo- 
cate advertising costs when a schedule 
is used in a spot campaign or for a 
network program," Baker told SPON- 
SOR. 

Stations themselves can I and prob- 
ably will) use SAM data to revise their 
program structures, knowing what 
counties and areas they are currently 



''Advertising is the counterpart in dis- 
tribution of the machine in mass pro- 
duction. It is mass distribution which 
makes possible mass production and the 
raising of the standard of living of our 
people to the highest level the world 
has ever known." 

FREDERIC R. GAMBLE 

President 

44's 



• • • • 



• • • 



covering, what their audiences are, and 
where they are not attracting large au- 
diences. 

Also, SAM data is likely to play an 
important role in future merchandising 
campaigns at local level. Stations and 
clients will know exactly what terri- 
tories are covered by a station and can 
thus match them against merchandising 
and promotional efforts to avoid waste 
motion and unnecessary expense. 

10. Gear SAM circulation data to 
"market" planning: States Baker: 
"Normally, for spot campaigns and for 
partial and regional networks, adver- 
tisers think in terms of areas — sales 
territories, distribution patterns, and 
so on. Timebuyers will do well to 
think in these terms when selecting sta- 
tions. SAM's area data are arranged 
in such a way that quick county-by- 
county comparisons can be made to 
determine 'best-station-in-county' for 
one county or a group of counties. This 
type of comparison may well yield 
one station or a group pattern for fur- 
ther consideration." 

(Note: This is not a trick timebuy- 
ers can do with the 400 SAM station 
reports, unless they want to do an aw- 
ful lot of cross-checking between re- 
ports. Special area reports will be 



prepared by SAM "at cost" tor agen- 
cies and advertisers, however, accord- 
ing to Baker.) 

11. "Ties" betireen stations van 
be broken with other related 
measures: Frequently, timebuyers 
will run up against a situation where 
two stations seem to have the same cir- 
culation, and an advertiser's budget 
can only buy one. Which is the better 
buy? "Ties can frequently be broken 
by using circulation data which shows 
the number of homes reached every 
day by a station — as contrasted with 
the number of homes reached once a 
week or oftener. A further refinement 
of this process is the 'average daily 
audience' which can be calculated with 
the formula reproduced on the cover 
of each SAM station report," Baker 
explains. 

"Another way to break apparent 
"ties' is to use program ratings. They 
may show that one station enjoys a 
larger 'share of audience' than an- 
other — even though they may both 
reach the same number of homes." 

12. Avoid classifying suit ions bg 
"types" in using SAM circulation 

data: Baker explains the danger in- 
herent in this practice as follows: 
"There are real differences between 
stations with regard to their circula- 
tion. But avoid classifying stations in- 
to 'types' of stations as having the same 
amount or kind of circulation. This 
kind of thinking forces stations into 
forms and shapes which many of them 
try very hard to avoid. 

"Some stations are very proud of 
the fact that their audience is chiefly 
among foreign-language groups, or 
among farmers, or among Negroes, or 
among the sports fans, or music lovers. 
The buyer must therefore look to other 
sources of information than mere cir- 
culation figures, and judge a station 
as well on its ability to achieve indi- 
viduality." 

13. Don't think of station circu- 
lation solely as popularitg con- 
tests: "Remember," Baker warns, 
"that station audiences are determined 
by a series of factors. Among them are 
the quality of the signal, the type and 
caliber of its programs, the competi- 
tion offered by other stations, the pop- 
ularity of its network affiliation, the 
promotional efforts of the station, etc. 
Formulas are no substitute for the ex- 
perienced timebuyer." * * * 




It's 
simple: 



YOU GET MORE 
CUSTOMERS 
PER DOLLAR 

on KROW... 

...in the $3 Billion 

San Francisco-Oakland 

Bay Area Market. 




• Pulse of San Francisco (Jan.- 
Feb., 1952) shows KROW giv- 
ing more listeners per dollar 
than any other station. 

• Pulse of Oakland (Jan. -Feb., 
1952) shows KROW leading in 
62 out of 68 quarter hours from 
7 a.m. to midnight! 

• No wonder more than 150 lo- 
cal, regional and national ad- 
vertisers use KROW as their 
leading bay area medium! 

• No wonder KROW has proved 
in scores of actual comparative 
sales tests that it gats more 
sales results per dollar! 

• 

For rates see listing 

or call 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO., Inc. 



KROW 

Radio Confer Bldg. 
19th ft Broadway • Oakland, Calif. 

Serving the Entire Oakland-San Francisco Bay Area 



26 JANUARY 1953 



87 




Ideal home for permanent tenancy! 
Perfect location (8:30-9:00 a.m. Monday 
through Friday) in well established 
neighborhood (Kansas City Primary 
Trade area). Dedicated recently by Bea 
Johnson (formerly Joanne Taylor) to the 
women of the Heart of America and oper- 
ated strictly according to the Heart of 
American plan. Immediate occupancy for 
advertiserwishing to reach large wealthy 
group who dominate 65% of Midwest 
purchases. The KMBC-KFRM "Happy 
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Call, wire or phone your nearest Free and 
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committments are recommended. 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Rural Kansas 



• • • 6th oldest CBS Affiliate • 



BMI 



Pi ii Up Sheet 

YOUR EVERYDAY GUIDE 
TO CURRENT SONG HITS 

The broadcaster faces a 
daily challenge of providing 
the best in recorded musical 
entertainment. 

To help meet this challenge 
BMI issues its monthly "Pin 
Up" sheet of BMI-licensed 
songs which can honestly be 
classed as Hit Tunes. 

Most broadcasting stations 
keep the BMI "Pin Up" sheet 
prominently posted as a con- 
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// you'd like your own 
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BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



SHELL CHEMICAL 

[Continued from page 37) 

Ammonia is one of mans most fa- 
miliar chemicals but it has been used 
as a fertilizer lit is rich in nitrogen) 
for only about 20 years. Shell's dis- 
tribution is confined at present to 
states west of the Rockies. 

II 4> ic Shell sells the farmer: Al- 
though Shell's agency, J. Walter 
Thompson, is always prepared to fire 
emergency advertising blasts and is 
primed with a flexible ad budget for 
that purpose, most time buying starts 
off with a schedule. It is revised fre- 
quently as the cycle of ploughing, 
planting, and harvesting progresses. 

Take the cotton schedule for Aldrin, 
for example. Hal O'Connell, Shell 
Chemical account executive at JWT 
(he handles Shell Oil, too), knows that 
during March and April the cotton 
farmer is normally bothered by thrips 
and cutworms. In May, it is the boll 
weevil. In June and July it is the boll 
worm. But if planting is late or early, 
the entire radio schedule must be shift- 
ed accordingly in the areas affected. 

In many areas, the boll worm has 
supplanted the boll weevil as No. 1 
destroyer of cotton. Like the weevil 
the worm attacks the payoff part of the 
plant — the cotton boll itself. Shell 
Chemical field reps keep a trained eye 
open for such infestation changes and 
radio commercials must be revised as 
these changes occur. 

During 1952, Shell bought more 
than 70 stations to sell Aldrin to cot- 
ton farmers in nine states — Alabama, 
Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mis«is- 
sippi. North Carolina, South Carolina. 
Oklahoma, and Texas. 

Dieldrin is also advertised as a cot- 
ton-pest killer. Because it is effective 
in hot climates. Shell has put on spe- 
cial radio campaigns for Dieldrin in 
the Rio Grande Valley and Mexico. 
Shell has found that Dieldrin used in 
combination with DDT is the most ef- 
fective killer of the boll worm and 
Dieldrin-DDT messages replace Aldrin 
in areas with heavy boll worm infesta- 
tion. 

D-D involves a slightly different ad- 
vertising approach than the insecticides 
for two reasons: (1) Soil fumigation 
is relatively expensive and (2) since 
soil fumigants kill plants, too, they 
must be put in the soil before plant- 
ing and time imisl be allowed for the 
fumigaut to dissipate. 

I)-I)s targel is the microscopic nem- 



atodes, a worm-like pest, and the best 
way' to kill it for sure is to inject the 
liquid D-D right into the soil. It turns 
into a gas which then permeates the 
soil thoroughly. 

Because of its cost, D-D is advertised 
for such crops as tobacco, celery, and 
tomatoes, where the dollar yield per 
acre is high. To get around initial 
price resistance, Shell radio commer- 
cials urge the farmer to treat only part 
of his land and then compare the re- 
sulls with the untreated area. The 
commercials are as personal and spe- 
cific as they can be within a minutes 
span. Here is a typical D-D commer- 
cial announcement: 

'"Tobacco growers: If root-knot nem- 
atodes have cut your tobacco profit, 
listen to what Avery Powers of St. 
Pauls, North Carolina, has to say about 
D-D, quote: T fumigated part of my 
tobacco with D-D during the 1951 sea- 
son. I made almost 2,000 pounds of 
tobacco per acre on the treated land 
. . . 247 pounds more per acre than on 
untreated land. This extra tobacco 



"A TWO WAY STRETCH" 

MAKES THE FIGURE 




IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOILING COMPANY 



SPONSOR 



sold for .$240 more per acre . . . many 
times the $15 I spent for trea'.ment.' 
End of quote. And Avery Powers' case 
is not exceptional. Tobacco growers 
everywhere recognize the value of D-D. 
Where root-knot nematodes are pres- 
ent D-D knocks them dead. There s no 
substitute for D-D made exclusively 
by Shell Chemical Corp. It comes 
ready to use in factory-sealed contain- 
ers. So, get in touch with I dealer's 
name I in (town). Phone I number) 
right now for your supply of D-D."" 

This commercial was beamed during 
the early part of last year, well before 
the tobacco was transplanted from the 
seed beds to the field. Because cold 
weather delayed tobacco planting in 
1952, a secondary campaign on radio 
followed the one originally planned. 

The unpredictability of weather and 
pests are not the only things Shell and 
its agency must be prepared for. Since 
Aldrin and Dieldrin are new, many 
uses for different pests and in different 
areas have to be established and ap- 
proved. This approval comes from the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, which 
must okay the use of insecticides ( 1 ) 
against specific pests, 1 2 ) for specific 
crops, (3) in specific areas. 

Early last year the department put 
its stamp of approval on the use of 
Aldrin for fighting corn rootworm in 
Iowa and adjoining states. Aldrin gen- 
erally comes mixed with fertilizer for 
this purpose, but the department's okay 
came after most farmers had already 
bought their fertilizer. 

Shell and JWT jumped into action 
with special radio commercials telling 
the farmer how Aldrin could be ap- 
plied to his field and worked in during 
harrowing and disking. Farmers who 
had not yet fertilized their fields were 
given radio instructions on how to mix 



Aldrin and fertilizer in cement mixers. 
The agency quickly bought 20 sta- 
tions in Iowa, Nebraska, and South 
Dakota. Each broadcast 30 announce- 
ments during the three-week campaign 
starting 10 March. A second cam- 
paign, just as speedily organized, fol- 
lowed the first after the Missouri Riv- 
er floods delayed corn planting. 

Time hiti/ing strategy: Ad Man- 
ager Keel says this about radio: "It 
can command the farmer's attention 
during certain periods when no other 
medium will work. Through research, 
we know these periods are in the earlv 
morning and during noontime. When 
the farmer is busy, he generally takes 
time out only to eat and listen to 
weather and market reports." 

Shell Chemical's time buying ap- 
proach, therefore, is more or less fixed 
to one pattern — two announcements 
per day during the week, one in the 
early morning and one around noon. 
Timebuyers look for adjacencies to 
newscasts, especially those containing 
weather and market reports. 

Stations are bought primarily for 
the coverage required. This involves 
the agency in the study of crop and 
infestation maps. Where two or more 
stations are competitive in coverage, 
the criterion, of course, is cost-per- 
1.000 delivered rural audience. Metro- 
politan power stations are occasionally 
used. They are often considered good 
buys for Shell Chemical in the early 
morning, when rates are low and lis- 
teners are primarily rural. 

In addition to radio Shell Chemical's 
ad money goes into (1) once-a-menth 
farm magazines, which Shell uses for 
detailed technical messages about its 
products, (2) farm newspapers, (3) 
billboards, and (4) technical literature 
and promotion material. * * * 



CHRISTINA ON RADIO 
' i lined from page 31 i 

She < hooses the questions with the idea 
"i iving the program variety, and her 
listeners information about new trends 
in gardening equipment, feed, insecti- 
cides, new and tried varieties ol flow- 
ers, as well as an occasional legend or 
anecdote about (lowers. 

Christina's ad policy: Christina's 
advertising expenditures have actually 
not riven in proportion to her success. 
From a total investment of $3,000 in 
radio in 1940, Christina Flowers spent 
75', of its $15,000 ad budget in L952 
on that medium. The remaining 2.V , 
of the budget paid for newspaper ads, 
strictly institutional catalogs which she 
occasionally sends out after mention- 
ing them on her program, direct mail 
— she uses statement inclosure and 
stuffers — as well as her booklet offers. 
Her newspaper advertising does not tie 
in with her weekly Monday morning 
radio program. The 100 or so inches 
of black and white that Christina Tin- 
ger uses per year plug only special 
sales. Sometimes, particularly during 
the holiday season. Christina rounds 
out her ad campaign with spot an- 
nouncements on other Oklahoma sta- 
tions: KOMEandKTUL. 

As she explains her advertising pol- 
icy to sponsor: "I do very little other 
than my Garden Club advertising, with 
the exception of a 13-week, 30-minute 
show on KOTV in 1951." (Christina 
liked TV, put on the show herself, but 
didn't have the time to continue it.) 
"Over a period of 13 years, I have used 
KVOO almost exclusively. We do very 
little newspaper advertising, and other 
than my stationery. I don't plug my 
radio show." 

Her lecture tours coupled with a pol- 




This is WHDH's Christine Evans! 

Mon. thru Fri. 9:35-10 A.M. and 1:00 to 1:30 P.M. 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 

e Boston Herald -Traveler Corp. 


WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



89 



FIVE NEW DEPARTMENTS 

that Sponsors Will Use 



How to make SPONSOR ever more useful to air- 
minded advertisers ami agencies is SPONSOR'S 
mission in life. In 1952 13 regular departments, 
each a use department, augmented the case his- 
tories, industry studies, research articles, and other 



use features highlighting every issue. 

Early in 1953 five new departments are being 
added. Each has a special use function; each will 
be invaluable to a large group of readers at radio 
and TV-minded agencies and advertising firms. 



1. SPONSOR-TELEPVLSE RATINGS OF TOP 
SPOT FILM SHOWS. Once monthly (effective 
29 December) SPONSOR presents a chart show- 
ing ratings of the 20 top spot films (mostly syn- 
dicated) in each market Telepulse surveys. 
Chart will be supplemented by other TV film 
data. In alternate issue, when chart does not 
run, definitive data on new TV film shows and 
commercials will be featured. 

2. TIMEBUYERS AT WORK. Effective 26 Janu- 
ary, the front section of each issue of SPONSOR 
highlights four timebuyers who are in the news. 

3. DIRECTORY OF NEW AND UPCOMING TV 

STATIONS. Effective 9 February, each issue of 



SPONSOR will list 10 key facts about new and 
upcoming TV stations that every TV-minded 
buyer will want to have. Date on air, competi- 
tion, number of sets in market, radio affiliation, 
radiated power, network affiliation, national rep, 
key executives are some of these. 

NEWSMAKERS IN ADVERTISING. Nine 
buyers and sellers of air advertising, including 
people at sponsor firms, agencies, networks, sta- 
tions, associated services, will be featured in this 
every issue department. Starts 26 January. 

Department five is number one in scope, prepa- 
ration, importance. It will start in March. Full 
details will be announced at a later date. 



► With these five new departments, and others that will join SPONSOR'S 
use roster as the need warrants, SPONSOR believes that in 7953 more than 
ever it will fulfill its purpose as the magazine radio and TV advertisers use. 



SPONSOR 



the magazine radio and TV advertisers use 






icy of personal service have helped es- 
tablish Christina as a well-known per- 
sonality in Tulsa. 

(Until 1952, Christina didn't use an 
advertising agency, but made her own 
contacts, and wrote and placed her 
own copy. However, last year she gave 
the account to the White Advertising 
Agency in Tulsa, with Pete White and 
Bruce Hall as account executives. I 

Her well-established 15-minute radio 
show actually has the strength of a 
15-minute commercial, although her 
shops are mentioned but twice on the 
air — at the opening and closing of the 
show. Summing up the format of her 
KVOO stint, Christina says: "Our 
theme song is 'Moonlight and Roses.' 
The announcer brings me on something 
like this: 'Each Monday morning at 
7:15, we bring you a meeting of Chris- 
tina's Garden Club of the Air. a presen- 
tation of Christinas Flowers, the Ultra- 
Modern Flower and Gift Shop at 18th 
and Boston Avenue and the Shop across 
the street from St. John's Hospital. For 
flower perfection follow Christina's di- 
rections. Now here is your president 
of Christina's Garden Club . . . Miss 
Christina. . . .' 

"At the close, a little more theme 
and mention of addresses and spon- 
sor — really, that is all there is to it." 

Direct results of Christina's show: 

However modestly Christina Tinger 
may sum up her radio achievement, 
her program promotes a constant 
awareness of the use of flowers in the 
home, in offices, as well as of the plea- 
sures of gardening. Today, the show 
draws an average of over 200 letters 
a week, without taking into account 
increases in response whenever a spe- 
cial offer is made. 

Last fall. Christina made $2.50 to 
$5.00 bulk offers, mentioning them just 



twice on one broadcast. These two 
mentions sold over 400 of the adver- 
tised items. 

On another broadcast, she offered a 
booklet called "Beautiful America with 
Roses." This one mention resulted in 
requests for 1,000 booklets within thai 
one week. 

Encouraged by the demand for book- 
lets that tell the story of certain lloueis 
and give tips on floral arrangements, 
Christina made another booklet offer 
on the air, suggesting that members ol 
the Garden Club request her "Living 
with Flowers." Each month she sends 
out 7.000 of these booklets, at a $700 
expense to her which she finds justified 
I crause she has found this booklet a 
valuable aid in keeping interest in flow- 
ers at a high pitch. 

An original "Corsage of the Week" 
contest, first sponsored in 1943. 
was met with such enthusiasm, that 
Christina initiated a regular "Corsage 
of the Week" in September 1952. Here, 
in the announcer's words, is how thi- 
give-away works: 

". . . Maybe I'd better explain how 
\ ou may be the winner of the 'Corsage 
of the Week." For the best question 
sent in each week, Miss Christina 
awards a corsage — we call it the 'Cot- 
sage of the Week.' Just address your 
question to The Garden Club, in care 
of KVOO, Tulsa. No matter where you 
live, if you are the winner — your cor- 
sage will be sent to you immediately ! 
Now. isn't this worth just a few min- 
utes of your time. Today, write Miss 
Christina your question on flowers or 
gardening and address vour card or 
letter to The Garden Club, KVOO. Tul- 
sa. And now. I see that time is up for 
today's Garden Club meeting — but 
come next Monday morning at 7:15 
when it's once again time for The Gar- 
den Club — be listening, won't you. . . 



A look at the floral industry: 

Despite a general upswing in the floral 
industry, Christina is aware of the 
challenge facing florists and is pre- 
pared to meet it. Since the beginning 
of World War II, people have been 
buying and using more flowers, but 
biggest and constant inroads are made 
into demands for flowers by charitable 
organizations which urge families to 
forego flowers lor funerals and to con- 
ti Unite to their favorite charities in- 
stead. > Christina has made it a pra 
tice in the last few years to send dow- 
ns to ever) I uncial in Tulsa free, with 
a card signed l>\ hei . I 

The Moral industry also suffers from 
the public impression that flowers are 
meant only for holidays and special 
occasions. \t these times, flowers are 
often higher priced, particularly since 
it is frequently the more perishable 
flowers rather than durable plants which 
are then in demand. These factors have 
contributed to the impression of con- 
sumers that flowers are high. The way 
the industry can counteract these snags 
in public relations is by an educational 
advertising policj rather than by con- 
centrating their ads on holiday seasons 
when the public is flower-minded any- 
how, and doesn't need the reminder as 
much as every day, Christina believes. 
Consumers need to be educated to the 
constant use for flowers in the home, 
she says, and the industry must gear 
itself toward a constant market. 

Major colleges and universities have 
been adding horticulture and floricul- 
ture departments over the past decade, 
and better trained growers, hybridiz- 
ers, and artists are joining state and 
city associations of florists in their 
schools and clinics. However, the k<\ 
to the problem. Christina feels, is still 
for florists to advertise all year, and 
in an informative wax. * * * 




This is WHDH's Ray Dorey! 

6:00 A.M. to 9:00 A.M. (Mon. thru Sat.) 7:00-7:30 P.M. (M-F] 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



26 JANUARY 1953 



91 



ROUND-UP 

{Continued horn page 67) 

WQXR for the past two and one half 
year- bul this is the first time that 
the) have heen grouped and offered 
for sale as a network. I Sales head- 
quarters are at WQXR. New York. I 
\Io-t of the network will carry WQXR's 
evening programs from (>:30 to 11:06 
p.m.. Monday through Saturday, and 
from 3:00 to 11:06 p.m. on Sundays. 
The majority of the stations will al- 
so tarry programs originating from 
WQXR during the daytime when they 
arc not broadcasting local programs. 
* * * 

The 10th Annual Brand Names Day 
conference takes place 15 April at the 
Waldorf-Astoria, New York. Louis 
Hausman, administrative v. p., CBS Ra- 
dio, has been named to the 16-niau 
planning committee for the event, will 
supervise entertainment arrangements 
at the Brand Names Day Dinner in co- 
operation with Lester Gottlieb, v. p. in 
charge of network programs for CBS. 




CLEVELAND'S 

en 

STATION 




5,000 WATTS— 850 K.C. 

BASIC ABC NETWORK 

REPRESENTED 

BY 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES 



Chairman of the planning committee is 
Edwin S. Friendly, v.p. N. Y. World- 
Telegram & Sun; other members in- 
clude: Edgar S. Bayol, Coca-Cola Co.: 
Howard R. Besuden. Procter & Gam- 
ble: Richard Borden. Atlantic Refining 
Co.: George W. Fotis. Remington 
Rand; Harrison Fraker. Topics Pub- 
lishing Co.; Gusreid V. Freund, Frank- 
fort Distillers Corp.; Monroe Green. 
A. Y. Times: Julius Haber, RCA Vic- 
tor: Richard E. Mueser. Hat Corp. of 
America; Richard A. Murray, A. Y. 
World-Telegram & Sun; Charles A. 
Rheinstrom. J. Walter Thompson; 0. 
A. Saunders. Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather; Bruce Watson. General Foods. 



KFAC will occupy new offices and 
studios in Los Angeles' Prudential 
Building as of 15 March. The station 
will have 6.000 square feet on the 
ground floor of the building, will have 
the benefit of the latest technical im- 
provements to aid in its main program- 
me purpose: to provide the finest pos- 
sible reproduction of good music. The 
new studios are on L.A.'s Miracle Mile, 
a district which is rapidlv becoming 
"ail a<?encv row" in that citv. In the 
immediate area of KFAC's new loea- 
idii are BBDO. CalVins & Holden. Car- 
locW. Mr-Clinton & Smith. Mogse-Priv- 
ctt. T. Waber Thompson, and Harrinff- 
ton-Richar^s. The new CBS television 
studio is six blocks north. * * * 



MEN. MONEY 

(Continued from page 101 

slam-bang from a sustainer? Of course 
you can't. Styles in statistication are 
changing. And in saying this we do 
not forget a hidden motive in the 
"Luigi" cancellation, namely, that Ital- 
ian-American owners of grocerv store* 
and viewers had been protesting to 
General Foods that certain characters 
stereotyped Italian- Americans. 
* * # 

Swing the light round and take a 
look at two magazines. One we shall 
not name but it has better than 2.000.- 
000 circulation. Yet this magazine has 
agony selling space because admen 
don't quite admire the editorial con- 
tent. Despite the statisticated circula- 
tion tale, the magazine looms in the 
thinking of too many clients, and per- 
haps unfairly, as "carbon copy. ' In 
short, short on allure. Contrast the 
magazine which lias 2.000. 000 circula- 



tion and trouble selling space with the 
theatrical weekly Variety, which has 
never once, in 47 years, ever told any- 
body how many copies it prints or sells. 
Completely unstatisticated though it is, 
the recent anniversary edition of Va- 
riety ran to 292 pages. 80% of it ad- 
vertising. Don't overlook personality. 

Back to the facing two directions at 
the same time and arguing two points 
of view simultaneously. Plainly the 
unanalyzable quality of personality, al- 
lure, gl'amour, sex appeal, it. zowie 
is a thing of supreme importance in all 
dealings w ith the public I i.e. consum- 
ers i . Again and again the unstatisti- 
cated personality breaks through the 
rigid rule that advertisers will onl\ buy 
on ire-cold arithmetic. 

But it comes out the same in the 
end. If its real allure-gramour. it 
won't take long to pile up a statisticated 
< onfirmation. So really there's no con- 
Hi* t so long as plenty of latitude is al- 
lowed for the newcomer to come 
through and so long as yesterday's 
statisticated values are not blindly wor- 
shipped. • • • 



BIG AGGIE LAND. 



Country- 

politan 
Market 

surpassed only by 
metropolitan NYC 
and Chicago. 

WNAX— 570 
Yonkton-Sioux City 

Represented nationally by 
The Katx Agency 

• 

CBS Radio 



92 



SPONSOR 



BETTER RATINGS 

{Continued from page 27) 

World War II. The NCS figure was 
17,706,930 for late spring; the NBC 
figure for the same period was 17,627,- 
300. The small difference, both NBC 
and Nielsen feel, lies in the fact that 
the NCS study counted in a lot of TV 
sets NBC usually misses. Such "lost" 
TV sets includes those that are custom 
jobs, sets made from kits, and those 
made by non-RTMA firms. NBC gets 
the bulk of its information only from 
RTMA members and their distributing 
organizations. 

3. Auto radios make up a huge 
"audience on wheels." The figure 
shown in the box on page 26 shows the 
number of families — 22,630,820 — who 
own one or more car radios in work- 
ing order. The total set count, since 
many families are multi-car families 
and have radios in most of them, will 
be even higher. The NCS figure on 
total car sets, when it's finally com- 
piled, isn't likely to be higher than such 
previous auto-set counts as BAB's esti- 
mate (January 1952) of 27,500,000 
radio-equipped cars. This is due chief- 
ly, to the fact that Nielsen omitted car 
radios "not in working order and not 
soon to be fixed," and because even 
the best previous auto-set studies were 
done from samples only a fraction of 
the size of the 100,000-home NCS 
study. 

4. Multiple-set homes represent an 
important segment of the broadcast 
audience. Some 43.7% of the nation's 
43,849,460 radio families— nearly 20,- 
000.000 homes — are multiple-set homes, 
and own two or more radios in work- 
ing order, according to NCS. TV, the 
NCS study also found, didn't drop an 
axe on radio. Out of all the radio 
home* in the country, NCS found that 



39% of them were radio-onl) and 61' - 
were TV or TV-radio. But. in the 
multiple-set homes only, NCS found 
that 50% of the three-set radio homes 
were radio-only and 50 '.y were TV or 
TV-radio. Conclusion: I A owners 
don't cancel out radio with TV view- 
ing: many of them land they're usu- 
ally an upper or upper-middle-class 
home) simply add more radios, or 
move radios into other rooms around 
the house. 

5. Many of the preceding finding- 
will affect the circulation data from 
NCS. Stations who subscribe to the 
"Comprehensive" Ser\i:c of NCS will 



"By all means use film when it proves 
beyond a question of doubt that it can 
do the best job of sellings; for you. But. 
under no eireumstanees, put all your 
eggs in the celluloid basket. It has an 
insidious way of drying up your own 
creative personality and the personal- 
ity of the products vou have to sell." 
PAUL PHILLIPS 
Radio and Television Director 
The iitkin-Kvnelt Co. 



receive breakdowns in their station re- 
ports which show weekly circulation 
(daytime and nighttime, and totals) 
by "single radio set" and "multiple 
radioset" homes. Also, these NCS re- 
ports will show similar circulation data 
in "homes with car radio." Thus, 
timebuyers can build up station lists 
which feature stations that are par- 
ticularly strong in multiple-set homes, 
or which have a strong appeal to mo- 
torists. 

The advantages of such a process 
accrue from being able to pinpoint 
special audiences for. say, automotive 
products or a food product at a time of 
day when kitchen radios la major ra- 
dio placement area in multiple-set 
homes I are in use. * * * 



510 MADISON 

' : i niicd from page 12 I 

RADIO MAP 

I lii- is lo ih. nk \ mi ver) much in- 
deed for sending me the two copies of 
your World Commercial Radio Map, 
requested in my letter to you. 

Your kindness in meeting in\ re- 
quest i< grealK appreciated and the 
maps in question will be invaluable. 

Since I wrote to sou the first copy 
of SPONSOR has come to hand and it 
make- \er\ interesting reading. 
Allan Blomfield 
Film & Radio Manager 
W . S. Crawford Limited 
London, England 



TV IN AUSTRALIA 

Thank you for sending us a copy of 
sponsor's first "International Report 
to Sponsors." We congratulate you on 
this publication — we feel it is an ex- 
cellent idea and would be a valuable 
medium in this country, although tele- 
vision, as far as Australia is concerned. 
is still around the corner. 

Frank Goldberg 

Governing Director 

Goldberg Advertising i lust. I 

Sydney, Australia 



MARS ON RADIO-TV 

We read your article on Mars and 
tbe candy industry with great interest. 
(See "'Radio-TV best sales tools we 
ever had' — Mars," sponsor, 15 Decem- 
ber 1952.) 

Congratulations on a fine coverage 
and reporting job. 

John P. Beresford 
Account Executive 
Cecil & Presbrey, Inc. 




This is WHDH's Fred B. Cole! 

Mon. thru Sat. 10:00 A.M. to 12:00 NOON 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



26 JANUARY 1933 



93 




IN HOUSTON 

with Growing 
Audiences in 
RADIO and 
TELEVISION 



daytime audience 

6 





Neilsen Coverage Service, May, 1952, 
shows 410,570 daytime radio homes . . . 
30% more than comparable 1949 BMB figures. 

nighttime audience 





Neilsen Coverage Service, May, 1952, 
shows 364,320 nighttime radio homes . . . 
11% more than comparable 1949 BMB figures. 




Total TV sets in 
irea en January 1, 1953 

225,000 

an increase ol 91% 

ever set count en 

January 1, 1952. 







Frank \\ hitv. president of NBC, brings to his 
new job the distinction of hating been a key 
executive of three networks {before NBC, Columbia, 
and Mutual). Unprecedented is the fact that within 
the period of one year he was president of two 
different nets. He has been in broadcasting for 15 
years, prior to which he was treasurer of the 
Literary Guild. Stage Publishing, and Newsweek. 



Frederie W. Zir. founder and president of rhe 
company which bears his name, has added a new 
merchandising gimmick to his transcribed Guy 
Lombardo Show. Ea<h local sponsor gets $2,500 
worth of Gruen Curvex watches when he signs a 
'i'2-week contract. Local announcers phone listeners 
during the program and award a watch each week 
to the person who identifies the "mystery medley."' 



Jai'fe Ditratt, advertising manager of Simoniz Co.. 
says of its recent alternate-week buy of The Big 
Story, "We're not gambling. TV has proved its 
effectiveness in selling our line of cleaners, polishes, 
ami waxes for car and home. These products lend 
themselves to dramatic demonstrations and 'before 
and after' use contrasts.'' Company continues its 70- 
week old participations in the Kate Smith Hour, 
besides the recent TV buy. 



T'om JfrDoilliC'ff. director of program develop- 
ment of Foote, Cone & lidding, fooled a lot of New 
Yorkers on New Year's Eve. For an hour-long show 
aired at 11:30 p.m. over seven stations (WNEW, 
JTl/C'l/. WC.nS, WJZ, WOR, WNBC, WMCA), Tom 
taped the music of Gum Lombardo in an NBC studio, 
used lire audience and convinced listeners they were 
at a lire party. Rheingold beer teas the sponsor. 



94 



SPONSOR 




Chicago Television 



FIRST in Programming — 

More than 25 hours per week of NON-FILM local programs prove a constant 
and successful effort to provide the best in TV for viewer and advertiser. 

FIRST in Audience — 

The average WNBQ rating for all quarter-hours is 17 PER CENT greater 
than the second station, 

(American Research Bureau, November 1952) 



FIRST in Sales Power- 
Ask any of the many WNBQ clients. 



*-„ 



YES, SOME SPOTS ARE BETTER THAN OTHERS . . . 

Chicago televis»<> n 



Represented by 
NBC SPOT SALES 



WNBQ 

CHANNEL5 




26 JANUARY 1953 



95 



V 



New England's 

fasfesf- 
graw/ing 

6 led is Eastern 
Conn... Served best 
by its largest city 

'NORWICH thru 



1 




(Continued) 




Some of Eastern 
Connecticut's big 
installations include 

• DOW CHEMICAL 

(Six miles from Norwicti) 

• ELECTRIC BOAT CO. 

(Submarines) 

• SUB BASE, GROTON 

(Ten miles, nearly 15 ,000 people) 

• PHIZER CHEMICAL 

• AMERICAN SCREW CO. 

• U. S. FINISHING CO. 

• AMERICAN THERMOS CO. 
and hundreds more. 

Here is the #1 Hooper 

station with the best Local Music 

and NeWS programming and 





Now 



one low rate 

6 00 AM-1015 PM 



MajorSalej 
Ike of i ' 
Eastern 
Conn. 



contact John Deme, Mgr. 

*Norwith 37,633 New London 30,367 




I flu in "Red" Reynolds, radio-TV director for 
Fletcher D. Richards, Inc., is credited with selling 
American Machine & Foundry Co. on the use of 
CBS TV's Omnibus. The firm's approach is unique 
as it hopes not only to show its defense role to the 
public, but to do a straight selling job to decision- 
makers in the audience. Imaginative programing to 
sell their imaginative manufacturing is copy theme. 



Hubbell Robinson, v.p. in charge of CBS Tl 
network programing, made neivs when he announced 
George S. Kaufman would return to This Is Show 
Business. The acerbic wit's remark, which he says 
uas intended as a slap at over-commercialization of 
Christmas, was considered an affront by many viewers 
who complained. Critics, others defended Kaufman, 
Shorv goes sustaining 24 January: includes Kaufman. 



huifene Ktitz has just moved up to the presidency 
of the Katz Agency, replacing his father who 
became board chairman. With the exception of 
30 months he spent with OW1 in Washington and 
London during the war, Gene has been with the 
organization since 1929. Prior to that, he was 
an advertising salesman and later a police reporter 
on the Daily Oklahoman in Oklahoma City. 



Robert M. Ganger, president of P. LorUlard 

Co., made a prediction last November that by 1960 
as much as 50% of cigarette sales will be accounted 
for by king-size and filter types. That the trend 
is well under way is substantiated by Business 
Week estimates of 1952 cigarette sales which 
show that king-size are up 54% and various 
filter types leaped up 66% over 1951. 



Da riff iff. Crandeli, new supervisor of television 
production at N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc., brings a 
wealth of experience to the post. Starting with a B.A. 
in drama and an M.A. in theatre, he did free-lance 
radio writing, acting, and producing on the Coast, 
worked in summer theatres, TV assignments, and, as 
an NBC TV director, handled such shows as Colgate 
Comedy Hour, Cameo Theatre, and Bob & Ray. 



?6 



SPONSOR 



iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
i .NTERNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS • • • INTERNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS • • • IHH 



Canada settles 

with U.S. TV 

nets; rates cut 



Weed's Canadian 

business up 10%; 

CJON added 



Alaska net expects 

boom year, lists 

new sponsors 



World radio 

audience totals 

600 million 



Radio best 

in Latin areas, 

Vladimir reports 



Chinese, Japanese 

on KONA (TV) in 

Hawaiian Islands 



Colgate lauds 

Aussie radio 

for success 



26 JANUARY 1953 



U.S. TV nets have now settled squabble with Canadian Broadcasting 
Corp. over share of sponsor's dollar. CBC's 2 TV stations, CBLT in 
Toronto and CBFT in Montreal, plan to add ABC, CBS, NBC shows soon 
as possible. (Du Mont hadn't joined boycott.) Terms of settlement: 
approx i mate l y 50-50 split ^ sponsor to pay only $750 an hour for CBLT 
(instead of $1,500) and $375 for CBFT (instead of $500). CBC dropped 
policy of charging for unused faci lities , crews. 

-IRS- 

Peter McGurk, Weed & Co.'s expert on Canadian radio, reports firm's 
Canadian business reached new high past 12 months, t opped 1951 by 
10%. Reasons, aside from "hard work on our part": (1) sponsors* in- 
creasing awareness of big multi-billion Canadian market ; (2) growing 
appreciation of fact Canadian radio can be bought cheaper in U.S. in 
that agency doesn't have to set up complete new office. Weed has 
added CJON, St. John's, Newfoundland, to list of over 30 Canadian 
stations it reps. 

-IRS- 

New sponsors over Alaska Broadcasting System's 6-station net announced 
by Alaska Radio Sales' Roy V. Smith: American Tobacco (BBDO), "Ameri- 
can Way"; Rexall Drug (BBDO), "Amos 'n' Andy"; Blatz (McCann-Erick- 
son) and K & L Distributors, Seattle, baseball; Borden (Y&R) , daily 
participation in "Milady's Memo." ABS expec t s 1953 to be record year. 

-IRS- 

Pan American Broadcasting Co.'s consultant, Dr. Arno G. Huth, esti- 
mates total radio sets in world rose from 56,765,000 in January 1936 
to 120 million in January 1941, 170,750,000 in January 1950, and 200 
million in fall 1952. Among leaders: Germany, 14 million; Britain, 
10.4 million; Japan, 9.5 million; France, 7.4 million registered, 2 
million estimated undeclared sets. He concludes: "World radio audi- 
ence totals over 600 million listeners." 

-IRS- 

Radio still gives best coverage in Latin American countries, chiefly 
because of illiteracy, according to Irwin Vladimir, president of Irwin 
Vladimir & Co. Discussing recent trip with SPONSOR, he cited Honduras 
where entire press reaches only 30-35,000 out of 1.5 million pop. 

-IRS- 

KONA, one of 2 new Honolulu TV stations, has begun broadcasting Chi- 
nese, Japanese programs once weekly. Packard Motors canceled Presi- 
dential inauguration film over KGM3-TV after last issue of SPONSOR 
went to press. (See "Why radio is strong in Hawaiian Islands, 
SPONSOR, 12 January 1953.) 

-IRS- 

Quote from Australian Colgate-Palmolive 's ad manager, K. J. Begley: 
"Australians use more Palmolive soap p er ca p ita than an y other nation 
in the world. Much credit for that has been due to our extensive 
use of radio advertising." (Australian "Broadcasting & Television") 

97 




Does Madame Commissioner know? 

Perhaps by the time these lines tome 
out the FCC will have handed down its 
final decision in the ABC-UPT case and 
the merger will have gone into effect. 
But it would seem to he of interest for 
the future of the broadcast medium to 
make the record clear on one point of 
the several controversial ones that have 
surrounded this case. 

Commissioner Frieda Hennock has 
been relentless in her hammering on 
one note in her opposition to the mer- 
ger. The background of her antago- 
nism is not so relevant here as her per 
sistence in restating that the stations 
affiliated with ABC would not be hurt 
by the continued delay in arriving at a 
resolution of the case. 

Talking as we have to ABC affiliates 
in our travels around the country, we 
think that Madame Commissioner is 



both factually and delinquently wrong; 
factually, in terms of the amount of 
revenue that they have recently been 
getting from the network, and delin- 
quently. in the sense that she patently 
hasn't gone to the trouble of asking 
them herself. 

The arithmetic is simple. For the 
first nine months of 1952 ABC re- 
ported a slight profit for radio but sub- 
stantial losses in TV revenue. Even 
though ABC benefited from the time 
bought during the political campaign 
it is doubtful whether by the end of 
year the network as a whole got back 
to the break-even point. 

From the way the affiliates have ex- 
pressed themselves to us, they're in- 
clined to link their individual state of 
health to the health of the network. 
They don't understand why anyone on 
the Commission should think it no 
longer necessary to speed the final de- 
rision in the matter. Or, have the op- 
ponents of the merger on the FCC the- 
ories of their own relative to the need, 
or reasons for existing, of networks? 
Aside from the fact that affiliates need 
the programing and revenue from net- 
works, the Commission might be re- 
minded of the record of service that 
the networks have built up over the 
past 25 years. 

How crucial the situation has be- 
come for many an ABC affiliate may be 
measured by this: In our swing around 
the country recently a number of ABC 
stations told us that, because of the 
sharp cut they've experienced in net- 
work revenue, they were seriously con- 
sidering going independent. Madame 



Commissioner Hennock may retort to 
these woes with a "Then let them eat 
cake," but it happens that the affiliates 
prefer a break and income from the 
network is looked upon by them as a 
substantial portion of their staff of life. 

Stop rushing for cover 

It's about time that radio and tele- 
vision stopped running with the rabbits 
and took their place among the lions 
when it comes to reacting to the roars 
and the bleats from pressure groups. 
The newspaper field is respected to a 
large degree for the strength it has 
shown in standing up to pressures from 
similar sources. Over the years news- 
paper advertisers have taken their cue 
from this steadfastness and shrugged 
off the outbursts of fanatics, the emo- 
tionally unstable, and publicity seekers. 

Timidity in dealing with pressure 
groups can only lead to more insidious 
snapping of the whip and more timid- 
ity. Advertisers, along with broadcast- 
ers, should consider that the breaking 
point has already been reached and 
start taking pause whenever the pres- 
sure boys put in their deadly work. 

Once such a policy of resistance has 
been adopted, advertiser's sales man- 
ager won't be so readily inclined to 
rush into action whenever the sponsor 
gets that "get-him-off-the-air" phone 
call from, for instance, that Syracuse 
chainstore operator, whose greatest 
boast, incidentally, is that he's got a 
trophy room full of heads of people 
he's had lopped off in television. 



Applause 



Educational TV 

Of interest to educators, advertisers, 
broadcasters, FCC, and others assaying 
the need and demand for educational 
TV facilities are two recent experiences 
in Baltimore. 

First, there was a school strike which 
prompted I < > n \ Provost, v.p. for radio 
and TV of the Hearst Corp., to offer 
\\ BAL-TV's facilities to the Hoard of 
Education. This was accepted with the 
suggestion thai other stations be in- 
vited to participate, making as much of 
1 citywide test as possible. WAAM 
(TV), WFBB. and WWIN joined in 



bringing the classroom to the Balti- 
more children. In addition to provid- 
ing the technical help and facilities for 
l he broadcasts, WBAL-TV. for exam- 
ple, furnished time valued at about 
$6,000. While not all of this was com- 
mercially lost to the station, a consid- 
erable portion was. When the returns 
were in, it was discovered that the TV 
classroom wasn't any more popular 
than the conventional variety: that it 
lakes all the coercion a mother can 
muster to keep her child viewing or 
listening. 

Quite a differenl >ior\ emerged from 
an all-day i closed circuit) demonstra- 



tion of surger) and medical informa- 
tion, facilities for which were again 
furnished by WBAL-TV to the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. The experiment, de- 
signed to learn whether closed circuit 
TV could lie used effectively to bring 
new medical data to doctors in remote 
areas, inspired this comment from the 
University's president, Dr. H. C. Byrd: 
"As long as there are stations like 
WBAL-TX providing the facilities and 
fine technical staff to help the Univer- 
~it\ to fulfill its dream of bringing edu- 
i ation into the home. I see no need 
for. nor would 1 back, an educational 
TV channel." 



98 



SPONSOR 




almost lO^of fhe 
nations -food sales 
takes place in 

WJRs brimanj 
coverage area, i 




-the great voice, 

of 
(Jie great fakes 



WJR MARKET DATA 

% of total 
U.S. market 

Population 12,601,300 8.3 

Radio Homes 3,785,540 8.6 

Farm Radio Homes 328,990 5.9 

FOOD SALES $ 3,266,766,000 9.4 

Retail Sales $13,613,431,000 9.3 

Drug Sales $ 464,447,000 10.3 

Filling Station Sales $ 739,614,000 10.1 

Passenger Car Registrations 4,116,934 10.2 

The tremendous volume of food sales in WJR's primary 
coverage area speaks for itself — almost 10 per cent of the 
national total! Here is an area vital to your national food 
sales — and an area which WJR covers like no other 
single sales force. Get your share of food sales in this 
area economically by using one influential sales voice. 
Use WJR, the Great Voice of the Great Lakes. 

For further information call WJR or your Christal 
representative today! 




ALMOST 10 PER CENT 
OF ALL OF THE NATION'S SALES 
TAKE PLACE IN WJR'S 
PRIMARY COVERAGE AREA. 




FREE 

SPEECH 
MIKE 



1^ 



WJR, Fisher Building, Detroit 2, Michigan 

WJR Eastern Office: 665 Fifth Avenue, New York 22 

Represented Nationally by the Henry I. Christal Company 

Canadian Representatives: Radio Time Sales, (Ontario) ltd. 

Radio — Ammnco't Greatmtt Advrtitmg Mmdium 



WEAS SwarLaU the Movement 



T 






As the first station in America to point the merit 
and profit of Negro programming, WEAS is 
justifiably proud. And we sincerely salute all 
those who have followed our first example in recognizing 
the Negro market's vast potential. And naturally 
we are gratified that the latest Pulse of Atlanta reveals 
WEAS still tops all rivals in the Negro programming field. 



WGOV KWEM WJIV WEAS 



Valdoitn 



5000 WATTS 



Wesf Memphis Ark. 
Memphis, Tenn. 

1000 WATTS 



Savannah, Ga. 



1000 WATTS 



Atlanta ■ Decatur, Ga 



10,000 WATTS 






CALL YOUR NEAREST 
FORJOE OFFICE OR STAR 
CANDLER BUILDING 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 



ilA 



MR FRANK YOUNG 

N B C 

30 ROCKEFELL£« PLAZA 

Ntw vo«* to n. y m 



BHHHHHHH^HH 




lagazine for Radio and TV advertisers 




WHAT AB-PT 

BEHOLD! I™**™*- 



page 27 




^4 New ... 





illys-Overland spends 
1,800,000 on air to 
ve car prestige sendoff 

page 30 




NET RADIO IN 
A COMEBACK? 

page 32 



Cometh In Blareh To 
The Land Of 

Milk mill IIoiioy 




What a sponsor should 
know about net cut-ins 

page 38 



IN 



SIN'S MOST £kow-<=Sull 



STATION IN GREEN BAY 





ioston Edison employees 
double as TV talent 
to pare program costs 

page 40 



HAYDN R. EVANS, Gen. M S r . — Rep. WEED & CO 



New and upcomin 
TV stations listed 
with market data 

page 42 



COSTS 



MISSOURI 



KAN! 



rY'S OLDEST CALL LETTERS 

1922 
1953 



WHB NEIGHBORIN' TIME 

Advertisers who sell to the masses have been quick 
to ride herd with this dinner winner — 2Vi hours of 
noon-time Saddle Soap Opera from "Triangle D 
Ranch," the Cow^ Country Club . . . with music by 
Don Sullivan and his Western Band, and the country 
philosophy of Deb Dyer. Bruce Grant is master of 
ceremonies, assisted by his side-kick, Pokey Red. 
Al. Bud and Pete enliven the proceedings with their 
musical novelties and wisecracks. Charles Gray gives 
the AP and local news report at noon. Broadcast 
from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily, WHB Neighborin' 
Time carries participating spots ("live" or minute 
transcriptions ) and sponsored quarter-hours. Ask 
for availabilities quickly to get your share of results 
when the chuck wagon comes 'round! 

"BIG SEVEN" BASKETBALL * K. C. "BLUES" BASEBALL 
* "BIG SEVEN" FOOTBALL and Other Sports 

WHB's ace play-by-play sportscaster, Larry Ray, is now in the winter 
season of forty-seven basketball games, broadcast direct from the 
campii at Kansas State College, the University of Missouri, the Uni- 
versity of Kansas and other "Big Seven" schools. April 16 he begins 
the baseball season, with 154 games of the Kansas City "Blues" (New 
York Yankee's No. 1 farm team) at home and away, sponsored by 
Muehlebach Beer. Next fall, ten "Big Seven" conference football games. 
And in between, golf, tennis, fishing and all other sports — included 
nightly on his 6:15 Sports Round-Up, sponsored by the Union Pacific 
and Broadway Motors (Ford). A few availabilities are still open — so 
get off the bench now if you want to team up with Larry to sell your 
product to the WHB;g Market's biggest sports audience! 




1 1 1 , ; i j i . 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 

n 

K • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS*'nYgHT 



DON DAVIS 

fllSlfcfNI {^ 

JOHN T. SCHILLING 

CfNffAL UANAClt 



JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



Willi N K.I II (TUB 
<>l Mil AIR 

I ln- 
it! — pre.< 

— or 
well-known 

the 

slmu and .imii" 



With "Oil" Wells as 
Master of Ceremonies 

His name is really Earl 
Wells — but a voice as 
smooth as oil, modulated 
to perfection — has earned 
him the nickname of 
"Oil." Monday through 
Friday, from 2 p.m. to 

()il pr< 
the latest popular records 
— and the old standard 
Two solid hours 
and 45 minutes of won- 
derful listening, with 
shoil 

ill. it make thi 

b features the 
Billbo 

the \\ mi 
announi 

« nlml ( )n on. 
the leading phi 

on the a 

i 



■§■§■■■1 




AB-PT network 
likely to seek 
new affiliates 



ABC to put 
emphasis 
on comic 

programing 



Frank 

White 

acquaintance 

bound 



CBS expects 

big Hollywood 

production 

accent 



Bayuk boxing 

getting the 

boxed-in 

treatment 



Reps ready 

drive on 

cigarette 

expenditures 



High on agenda of AB-PT network after merger will probably be bolster- 
ing of relationships with present ABC affiliates and quest for new 
ones. ABC had been hampered in competition with NBC and CBS by cov- 
erage disadvantages. It will in all likelihood bank on streng t hened 
programing lineup to attract new affiliates. In addition, offers of 
greater compensation for affiliation are logical steps as AB-PT moves 
to step up competitive pace. 

-SR- 

Showwise Bob Weitman, who will head up AB-PT 's programing opera- 
tions, will probably make strong bid for top comedy talent . Intima- 
tions are that he will try raiding other networks along with building 
some not-so-well-known comic personalities. Weitman is well conver- 
sant with available talent though he has not been able to take any 
steps prior to merger. (See article on merger, page 27.) 

-SR- 

NBC ' s new president, Frank White, will do much hopping around country 
during next several weeks, talking to affiliates in district groups. 
Purpose of visits will be mostly to get acquainted. Says he won't 
make any "pitches." Has Los Angeles stand booked for 16 February. 
While with Mutual White ranked as about the most traveled network 
head in history of business. 

-SR- 

CBS TV figures that 80% of network-produced shows will be coming out 
of its Hollywood studios in next 6 mont h s. Capacity of this new Coast 
factory is 28 half-hour shows per week. Because production cost is 
so much lower there than in New York, network estimates it will hit 
capacity production there by end of 1953. It has expansion blueprints 
all ready to meet further needs. 

-SR- 

Promoters of fight telecasts for Bayuk cigar on ABC TV Saturday nights 
are running into stiff pressure from competitors in business of book- 
ing bouts for other sponsored programs. Fighters who sign for Bayuk 
program suddenly find themselves in big demand, for instance, by In- 
ternational Boxing Club. Ray Arcel, promoter-contractor for Bayuk, 
feels pressure is inspired by another sponsor of network boxing. 

-SR- 

Station reps are girding for harder try at cigarette spot business. 
Spokesmen figure s pot radio and TV should ge t $20,000,000 at least as 
their share of $80,000,000 it is estimated cigarette brands will spend 
for advertising during 1953. Believe competitive moves into king-size 
should make spot important contender for resulting expanded ad budgets. 



SPONSOR, Volume 7, No. 3. 9 February 1953. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publl ations. Inc.. at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Circu- 
lation Offices 510 Madison Ave . New York 22 $8 a year in U. S. 19 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1919 at Baltimore. Md. postofflee under A«t 3 March 1879 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 9 February 1953 



Zenith holds Zenith Radio Corp.'s latest argument in behalf of fee-TV: More than 
small towns 20 million Americans will be without nearby TV station unless pay-TV 
will depend is e s tablished to finance small t o wn stations. Argument voiced by 
on fee-TV H. C. Bonfig, Zenith sales v. p. , is that although TV channels have 

been set aside for 887 cities below 25,000 in population only 83 ap- 
plications for such towns have been filed with FCC. 

-SR- 

Film blurb New York producers of film commercials are confident they will be back 
production in production by 1 March. Negotiators for Screen Actors Guild appear 
may resume to be leaning toward general concept of repay m ent formula which had 
1 March been advanced by ad agencies. Major roadblock to settlement now re- 
maining is definition of what constitutes "new spot." Agencies con- 
tend that when copy line only is changed in film commercial, revision 
should not constitute a new spot and hence be subject to same pro- 
rated royalty as any other commercial. Union insists that once sound 
track is changed all credits for repayment are wiped out, which, say 
agencies, would make talent cost of the commercial prohibitive. (See 
"Will SAG demands hurt spot TV," SPONSOR, 6 October 1952.) 

-SR- 

Downtrend Special sales plans (like Pyramid and Power), intensive merchandising 
in net radio plans, and other devices have served to slow up stead y downtrend in 
leveling off network radio sales which began in 1948. In fact, CBS last year sold 
more quarter hours than it did in 1948. Prediction for 1953 is this 
downtrend will level off. (See analysis of current status of network 
radio sales starting on page 32. ) 

-SR- 

Sun Oil Sun Oil is shopping around for a network TV show. Account for present 
in market is using schedule TV spot announc e ments. Agency: Hewitt, Ogilvy, 
for TV show Benson & Mather. 

-SR- 

Single Trend toward single rate, which SPONSOR analyzed in detail in 29 

rate December 1952 issue, is apparently taking on added pace . Mutual has 

trend reduced, in effect, nighttime rates to daytime level, while ABC has 

speeds up adopted equalized rate for its & stations. 

-SR- 

Quiz shows TelePulse, comparing network TV programing in December 1952 and 1951, 
on network reveals that program type which g ot lar gest incr ease in time was quiz- 
upbeat audience participation. Trade comment on this development: It prob- 
ably reflects increasing tendency among advertisers with limited bud- 
gets to get away from high-priced glamor shows. 

-SR- 

Radio gets Radio will continue to get largest share — $2,000,000 — of Wrigley Gum 
biggest share budget in 1953 as compared to 1952. However, in terms of dollars 
of Wrigley radio will receive half million less than in 1952. Henry L. Webster, 
budget Wrigley ad manager, says difference represe nts mostly rat e redu ction. 
Network TV's share will be same as last year's — $800,000. Wrigley 
ad budget for 1953 is $8,700,000; was $7,540,000 in 1952. (For Wrig- 
ley's 1953 plans, see P.S., page 24 in this issue.) 



SPONSOR 







New Haven's prosperous industries 

make it a rich market, deserving 

the attention of every advertiser and 

his ad agency. Most efficient way 

to reach the buyers in this lucrative 

market is through WNHC. It's 

the "community center" for fine 

entertainment and news — all with a 

strong local flavor. 

To keep your products 

in the homes of New Haven — 

sell the people at home via WNHC. 



in new haven 




The City Printing Company is typical of the hundreds of small enterprises that 
have grown into prominent and successful business establishments in 

New Haven. From its start in a loft in 1919, City Printing Company has expanded 

to this piesent-day modern plant employing 65 persons and serving 

companies throughout the country. 



n h c 




flew ll3Ven New England's firs! 
complete broadcasting service 

Represented nationally by the Katz Agency 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



the magazine Radio and TV 



advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



The \BC-UPT merger: meaning to sponsors 

As SPONSOR goes to press, decision in ABC-UPT merger is imminent. Here 
are details which blueprint the significance of the merger to radio-TV advertisers, 
listings of the personnel involved, background of the alliance, other facts of 
interest to sponsors as well as to their agencies 

II ill us moves into high soviet g 

Out to sell potential passenger car purchasers on the quality and high style of 
its new line, Willys is plunging $1,800,000 into prestige-type radio and TV 
programing, winning many new dealers 

Is net radio staging a eomehaek? 

Participation plans, rate adjustments, merchandising, cut-in arrangements, and 
tailor-made networks are among the gimmicks used by the nets to brake the 
slide in billings. As a result of lower costs and greater service now offered by 
network radio, many oldtimers are returning and newcomers are jumping in 

11 hat merehandising vonsultants did for Purina 

By intensive, experienced central planning, followed by close support and 
encouragement at the local level. Purina squeezed the last ounce of value out 
of its farm-radio promotion contest 

TV puzzler: ivhat new markets to add 

Advertisers and their agencies are taking longer, sharper looks at blossoming 
TV markets. Agencymen are striving to arrive at a set of rules to apply to 
their clients' market needs and to their advertising budget 

What a sponsor shoultl know ahout net eut-ins 

Advertisers are finding local cut-ins are a means of combining the advantages 
of network and spot operations. Sponsors can qet guaranteed time slot, yet 
plug specific brands in particular markets. Local dealers may be spotlighted 

Utility employees tlouhle on TV to pare vosts 

For under $60,000 a year, Boston Edison Co. gets year-'round weekly TV show 
by having regular home economics staff double into half-hour program which 
pulls up to 4.000 letters a month 

Complete list of new ami ttpeoming TV stations 

All stations which have been granted construction permits since the lifting of 
the freeze are listed herein with target date for going on air, number of sets in 
the market, market sales rank, power, rep, network, other important data 



27 



30 



32 



34 



37 



3S 



40 



42 



COM I NC 



What timehugers tvant to knotv ahout I III 

Upcoming SPONSOR study will detail facts about UHF. Coverage estimates to 
date, quality of reception, results with convertors will be covered 

23 February 
Spot radio business report 

Survey of current campaigns, estimate of dimensions of current spot radio 
boom with analysis of trends in buying 

23 February 



9 February 1953 
Volume 7 Numb 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT W ORK _■.___ 6 

MEN, MONEY 8C MOTIVES ___. 10 

510 MADISON 12 

NEW AND RENEW 17 

MR. SPONSOR, H. Katz 22 

P. S. 24 

RADIO RESULTS 52 

NEW SYNDICATED TV FILMS 56 

AGENCY PROFILE, R. Doiley 60 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 62 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 64 

ROUND-UP 68 

NEWSMAKERS IN ADVERTISING 92 

INTERNATIONAL REPORT 95 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 96 



Editer 1 President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 

Executive Editor: Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jafte 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackion, Evelyn 

Konrad 

Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President - Advertising: Norman Knight 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coope 

(Western Manager), Maxine Cooper (Eastern 
Manager), Gust J. Theodore (Chicago Repre- 
sentative), Wallace Engelhardt (Southern 
Representative), John A. Kovchok (Produc- 
tion Manager), Cynthia Soley, John McCor- 
mack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Plati 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Sati (Sub 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearmo< 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly in SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.. 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, and 
Advertising Office! : 510 Madison Ave.. New Tork 21 
N. T. Telephone: Ml'rray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
161 £. Grand Ave., Suite 110. Telephone: Superior 7-9868 
West Coast Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard, Loe Angeles 
Telephone: Hillside S089. Printing Office: 8110 Ela 
Ave. Baltimore 11. Mil. Subscription!: United States 
18 a year. Canada and foreign SO. Single copies *0t 
Printed Id U. S. A. Address all correspondence to 511 
Madison Avenue. New York 22. NT MTJrrti HIH I 1TT» 
Copyright 1953. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Still More Jobbers 

in Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas 

Praise 
KWKH 



JOE T. MONSOUR, President, 
Monsco Supply Company, 
Shreveport, SAYS: 

"KWKH does a good job 
for us" 




M. A. DICKSON, President, 
Shreveport Druggist, Inc., 
Shreveport, SAYS: 

"Whole-hearted thanks 
to KWKH" 




JOHN B. WILLIAMS, Owner, 
Food Brokerage House, 
Shreveport, SAYS: 

"KWKH coverage is 
excellent" 




JC/very good media man knows that buying radio 
time should involve more than a cut -and -dried 
analysis of rates, power, network affiliation, etc., etc. 
Every station has a "personality" . . . has a tangible 
record, either good or bad, for influencing its lis- 
teners and producing sales. These qualities are best 
appraised by local business men who hear the 
station, who use the station, and who know what 
it can do every day. 

Read the excerpts at the left from letters written 
us by three typical jobbers in the KWKH area. 
They testify to KWKH's advertising impact — to 
KWKH's ability to produce sales at low cost! 

Get all the KWKH facts. We'll be glad to send them. 
Write direct or ask your Branham representative. 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 

Texas 



SHREVEPORT! LOUISIANA 



The Branham Company 
Representatives 



Arkansas 



Henry Clay, Genera/ Manager 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 




49 th STATE 



By Jack Burnett 



With Statehood for Hawaii, on- 

sidered a practical certainty before the 
new Congress adjourns, this 40th mar- 
ket of the U.S.A. may take its rightful 
place in timebuyers' eyes. And, with 
Hawaii's third largest industry, mali- 
hinis (visitors) making a bid to over- 
haul the two big revenue producers, 
sugar and pineapple, the market should 
move steadily higher on the list. Right 
now, plans are being made for three 
huge new hotels in W'aikiki. 

Here are a few facts a t hand 

worthy of note for your next spot cam- 
paign : 

There are 7 7 9,000 radio homes 

in the Territory according to the 1950 
census. Of these 84,400 are on the island 
of Oahu, including Honolulu. The bal- 
ance of 35,600 are on the five neighbor 
islands. In population, the Honolulu 
market exceeds that of San Diego, Cali- 
fornia and Columbus, Ohio. Retail sales 
exceed Oklahoma City and Providence. 
Food sales are greater than New Orleans 
and Denver. General merchandise sales 
are larger than Omaha or Hartford. 
Drug sales are considerably larger than 
San Antonio, Texas. Furniture house- 
hold and appliances exceed sales in 
Nashville, Tennessee or Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. Honolulu should be on any 
list that includes these cities. 

Further proof of buying power 

is the fact that the family income of 
Hawaii is larger than that of any state, 
and residents of the Territory pay more 
in Federal Income Taxes than 14 states. 

No market in the U.S.A. j s more 

adapted to advertising through radio. 
It takes 14 newspapers to cover the 
same field that Hawaii's Big, Popular 
Station can accomplish. With 10,000 
watts on 690 kilocycles, every corner of 
the Islands can be readily reached. The 
single strength proof is there, of course, 
but the best proof of all is the fact that 
KULA has 21 local advertisers in the < ii\ 
of Hili), Hawaii s second largest city, 
and the most distant point from Hono- 
lulu located on the Rig Island of Ha- 
waii, 200 miles distant. There arc 17 
regular local advertisers on the Island 
of Maui and II on Kauai. 

Please write to US for any infor- 
mation that will be of interest. 





-r.i 



Mrs. Edna Cut heart. J. M. Mathes, Inc., re- 
cently went through quite a hassle in connection 
with Canada Dry's switch from Super Circus via ABC 
TV to Terry and the Pirates on a spot basis. The 
sponsor decided that the network's "must" list 
didn't fit the product's distribution pattern so the 
switch to spot was decided. Show is noiv seen in 
54 markets, including Honolulu, at various times. 



Robert Tatum. BBDO, has to keep an eagle eye 
on TV station target dates so that he can schedule 
radio and TV announcements for Crosley TV as 
quickly as each market opens. Prior to his almost 
two years at BBDO, Bob broke in at Compton. 
and admits that buying time for P&G is a real 
training ground for anyone. His other accounts 
include Schaefer Beer, and Vicks (TV only). 



Richard Hurley, Compton Advertising's asst. 
head timebuyer, is directly concerned ivith the new 
spot campaign for CampbelTs Pork & Beans, as 
tvell as with the constantly active P&G products, 
Ivory Flakes and Drene. Formerly manager of 
WV AM, Altoona, Pa., he finds that his experience 
on the "other side of the fence" is a valuable 
asset. He and Mrs. H. expect a child soon. 



.Albert Peteavaae, Ted Bates & Co., is kept 
hopping these days buying some of the heaviest 
schedules he's ever handled. For CBS-Columbia TV 
sets he is pacting as much as 21 nighttime minutes 
per week in the country's six largest TV markets. 
And Anahist is buying plenty of spots to cash in on 
those winter colds. Sometimes AI yearns for those 
carefree space selling days he enjoyed in Honolulu. 



SPONSOR 



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1,000,000 
UNDUPLICATED 
VIEWERS PER WEEK 

WHEN YOU BUY 

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Every week, more than 1,000,000 Southern 
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the Los Angeles Angels and Hollywood Stars. 
Almost half of these fans tune "Baseball" four 
or more times per week. The average viewing 
time for all fans is 5.2 hours a week. That's 
nearly one-third of the total time "Baseball" is 
on the air! 

These amazing facts were disclosed through 
a special survey made by ARB in Sept. 1952. 

To catch this big, sports -minded Southern 
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1000 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 9, California • 1440 Broadway, New York 18, N. Y. 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



D MORE 

ORS AR 





JUDY CANOVA 




DAVID ROSE 




DICK HAYMES 




MIMI BENZELL 




RAYMOND MASSEY 




ORLD STARS 

he greatest names in show 
business . . . big, dramatic 
stars who are big box office 
nationally . . . are now avail- 
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amazing quantity of top-qual- 
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WORLD ARTISTS 

From hillbilly to Metropolit, 
Opera stars . Arncrii 
leading vocalists and 
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lions with listening pleasure 
that's a pleasure to sell ! 



WORLD SPECIAL 
CAMPAIGNS 

Attention-getting, sales-mak- 
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and special selling campaigns 
are designed for all types of 
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Every week . . . sparkling, new 
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WVHLLS nut Ll\ I I JIIVU HI U5— Colorful, sponsor-selling broadsides . . . complete, audience-building 
wnotional portfolios ... and exciting, sales-clinching audition discs are provided by World to help stations sell! 



EDDY HOWARD 



MORE AND MORE STATIONS 
ARE SELLING WORLD! 




"In my opinion, you have 
the most complete and pro- 
gressive service of its kind." 
VVMCA, New York, N. Y. 
M. M. Fleischl 
General Manager 

'"We wanted a service that 
our station could sell. We 
took WORLD and the re- 
sults prove that we made a 
wise choice." 

WKHM, Jackson, Michigan 
Walter Patterson, 
General Manager 

"We've found that 

WORLD, plus production 

on the local level, spells 

SALES!" 

KMOD, Modesto, California 

Gene" D'Accardo 

Program Director 

"W e are delighted with 
WORLD. The reason is sim- 
ple ... we are making money 
with your service." 

VYABI, Bangor, Maine 
Lee Gorman, Jr. 
AAanager 

"We are Indeed pleased with 

WORLD. It is definitely 

paying its way here plus a 

nice profit." 

VVLAG, LaGrange, Georgia 

Edwin Mullinax 

General Manager 

"It is my sincere opinion 
that 'any* station — in 'any' 
market can make money 
with your service!" 
KTFS, Texarkana, Texas 
David M. Segal 
General Manager 




MONICA LEWIS 




WALTER HUSTON 




ROBERT MONTGOMERY 




THE THI 




ERT MAXWELL 




RAY BLOCH 





that's what 
you like about 
the South' s 

Baton Rouge 

1952 was Baton Rouge's most spec- 
tacular year — and '53 will be as 
good as '52. That's Economic Analyst 
Roger W. Babson's prediction, borne 
out by these criteria of progress: 

General business activity, up 

13%* 
Assessments, up 11% 
Sales tax collections, up 

8.9% 
Postal receipts, up 5.1% 
Bank debits, up 5.2% 
Retail sales, up 15% 
Dept. store sales, up 10% 
* All %s express '52 gains over 51. 



With a $178,688,000 industrial ex- 
pansion program under way, Baton 
Rouge as a market for your products 
is well worth investigating ... as is 
WJBO, the booming voice of boom- 
ing Baton Rouge. 




WFtUATlD WITH THE STATE-TIMES AND MORNING ADVOCATB 
rURTHtt DATA FROM OUR NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY CO. 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



Noted tit passing 

A little sad, but very fascinating, is the story of Douglas Coulter 
who died suddenly 21 January at the age of 52 as he was preparing 
to leave his home in Scarsdale for his NBC TV producer's job in 
Manhattan. Events, and his own hermit-like inclinations, had made 
Doug somewhat obscure in recent years. Now in death, and in the 
death notices, the spotlight was full beam again. He was credited, 
and rightly credited, with a record of radio program "firsts" second 
to nobody's, and this column extends that to include even the veteran 
John U. Reber of J. Walter Thompson. 



With their unsurpassed flair for the belated gesture, the celebrities 
of show business and the brass of advertising filled the Scarsdale 
home of this too-little-honored pioneer with floral tributes worthy 
of a Chicago alderman. Theirs was an unmistakable awareness that 
Doug, not the first man nor the last to do so, had lived beyond the 
epoch in which he made history into a succeeding generation that 
knew very little history. 



The strangeness of the Coulter saga consists partly in the kind of 
man he was and the kind of existence a quirk of circumstance forced 
upon him. Doug was a complex man, not easy to know, introspective 
and unpredictable. People who knew only the hard-bitten broadcast 
executive will hardly credit that he was a lover of books and music, 
a man much alone with his thoughts. 



From his native Baltimore, and Johns Hopkins University, Doug 
went forth as an instructor in Latin. English, and — get this — 
Physical Education to the American University in Cairo, Egypt. 
This was hardly the expected background for a man later hired by 
N. W. Ayer to look into this new foolishness called radio, circa 1924. 
He was a one-man department in the ad agency which above all 
agencies was dedicated heart, soul, and 16%% to the proposition 
that newspapers were and always would be the backbone of adver- 
tising. Coulter conceived the radio shows, wrote the scripts, went out 
and sold them to Ayer clients, and then came back and cast, pro- 
duced, and directed them in the studio. 



As time went on, Doug Coulter made radio history, became the 
vice president of one of the first big agency radio departments. He 
bad more nighttime billing for a while than any other agency, lost 
out to Blackelt-Sample-Hummert only because Ayer had no soap 
operas. Those were days of chance-taking. Everything was an ad- 
venture. Harry Ommerle, then at Ayer, now at CBS, perhaps Doug's 
closest friend and executor of his estate, recalls the early 1930's as 
"a lot of fun." But it is a nice question whether the younger men 
(Please turn to page 86) 



10 



SPONSOR 



AN EAR FOR AN ERA, 

an eye for an ear 



N 



s 




MAN and boy, we've been in radio for 
thirty years and now we're adding 
television. Target date is mid-April. We 
feel a little like the guy who was a human 
target at the State Fair — his job was to 
stick his head through a hole in a big canvas 
and dodge baseballs. Things went along fine 
for season after season. He became adept as 
a coyote; it took a mighty fancy shot to 
bean him. Well, he got beaned proper one 
day and sat down on a cactus. That gave 
him an idea. He fixed things up so he could 
stick his head through the canvas, painted 
a target on his southern exposure, and 
behind him folks threw darts. 



The transmitter antenna will rise 833 feet. 
From it, powered with 100,000 watts, our 
visual signal on Channel 4 will have an esti- 



mated radius of 98 miles, reaching a poten- 
tial audience of 591,140 people. No, they 
don't all have TV sets. But give 'em a couple 
of months or so. Texans move fast. 

So does our AM signal — right into our 
78-county, 5-state coverage-and-market area 
which accounts for Amarillo's highest-in-the- 
nation per capita retail sales figure. 
Choose your weapon — baseballs or darts. 



KGNC 



Amarillo 




AM b TV 



NBC AFFILIATE 



710 KC 

9 FEBRUARY 1953 



10,000 Watts 



Represented nationally by The O. L. Taylor Company 



11 



competition 
got you 
up a 
TREE? 




Relax . . , 
use CKAC 
Montreal 



1. Huge coverage — 2 out of 
3 French radio homes in 
Quebec. 

2. Hundreds of thousands of 
faithful listeners day and 
night, as reported by 
B.B.M. 

3. Selling power second to 
none — over 7,500,000 
box tops in 1952. 

CBS Outlet In Montreal 

Key Station of the 

A TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives: 

Adam J. Young Jr. - New York, Chicago 

Omer Renaud & Co. — Toronto 




Madison 

FARM SECTION 

The 1952 farm market study in 
sponsor 1 29 December 1952 1 is the 
best that has ever appeared. 

By charting a year-by-year trend in 
this almost-exclusively radio-dominated 
area, you are performing a service that 
is unduplicated anywhere else in the 
radio advertising field. Perhaps the 
only negative reaction I have to your 
article stems from the necessity of your 
following this up-to-date trend. It is a 
fact in the past year or so the farm 
market has actually decreased in sig- 
nificance. A comparison of its current 
state, however, with its condition a dec- 
ade ago reveals a considerably differ- 
ent picture and one which might be 
more attractive to the less informed 
sponsor. 

Among those astute farm advertisers 
who know what they're doing with 
farm advertising, this article fits like 
a glove. It is only for those unin- 
formed firms that I would wish a long- 
er-term trend shown. This latter fact 
seems important to me because it is 
here I lirlir\ c that one ol radio's greal 
assets lies. Those advertisers of farm 
producers' equipment either are now 
using or have in the past useo 1 radio to 
reach their industrial market. Presum- 
ably they will again in the future. Those 
firms who are not strong users of radio 
to reach this market have been those 
consumer goods advertisers who have 
either counted on their national maga- 
zine space to cover this area or else 
have ignored the concept of the farm 
market completely. It's this tremend- 
ous source of revenue for radio sta- 
tions in farm areas that must be tapped. 

I believe that with intelligent use. 
your article can fill the bill for both 
producers* equipment advertisers and 
consumer goods advertisers, and taken 
in combination with sponsor's previ- 
ous articles, the long-term story is defi- 
nitely there. Again my congratulations 
for a very comprehensive job. 
R. David Kimble 
Director of National Promotion 
BAB 



Inasmuch as our booklet was pub- 
lished early in 1951 before the Census 
figures were available, and your fine 
reporting brings these figures up to 
date, I am wondering if we in turn 
may have the privilege of using, with 
proper credit, your interpretation as a 
supplement to our earlier presentation. 
We would like your permission to 
reproduce the article. "'Farmers in 
1953: fewer, richer, tighter — with 
$14.2 billion net to spend," along with 
the graph and charts on page 28. 

S. B. Wildrick 

President 

Wildrick & Miller. Inc. 

New York 

• Reprint rights for SPONSOR article!, may be 
obtained by writing to SPONSOR for permission. 



Congratulations on a terrific farm 
market issue. Frankly, I think it is 
one of the biggest boosts the farm di- 
rectors have ever received and I know 
it will help us all a lot. 

Phil Alampi 

WJZ Farm & Garden 

Radio-TJ Director 



I want to congratulate sponsor for 
the excellent story in the December 29 
issue on Farm Radio and TV. It cer- 
tainly tells the farm story. I hope that 
some of the advertising agencies and 
advertisers trying to reach the rural 
and urban audiences realize that they 
can get results if they give the RFD's 
a chance. 

I will bring your article to the atten- 
tion of the NARFD membership, by 
putting a small note in the February 
issue of RFD Chats. 

Harold J. Schmitz 

Farm Service Director 

KFEQ 

St. Joseph, Mo. 



We are glad that our booklet. "Few- 
er .. . Larger . . . Richer.*' proved 
helpful to you as a guide in building 
your facts about the farm market. 



SPONSOR-TELEPULSE RATINGS 

We are 20th Century-Fox Television 
Productions were very pleased to see 
Crusade in Europe made such an ex- 
cellent showing in \ our first TelePuIse 
rating. 

Actually. Crusade in Europe is do- 
ing even better as many markets are 
third runs with Los Angeles being 
fourth. Buffalo's 56.0 rating was ob- 
tained on second run. 

P. A. Williams 
20th Century-Fox Television 
Productions 



12 



SPONSOR 




Darling, They're Playing Our Song 



John Beck had a problem of classic 
simplicity. He wanted to find out 
how to persuade grown men to imi- 
tate wild ducks. 

John Beck sells athletic goods. WMT 
sells time. (Musical bridge here, 
"Mating Call of Athletic Goods Store 
lor Eastern Iowa Radio Station.") 
After locating a copywriter with 
mallard instincts, WMT went to work. 
The trick was turned with a recording 
of a duck call and some rather choice 
pintail prose. Beck's sold 288 duck 



calls, twice as many as they sold all 
last year, plus 288 decoys, plus 41 
duck call records — all in lour weeks, 
and before the season opened. 
The entire project went oil without 
a loose quack, except for one minor 
annoyance. We had neglected to say 
that our duck call was recorded, and, 
during the fourth week of the cam- 
paign, a rather nasty canvasback 
drake broke into Studio A demanding 
to meet "that girl with the lovely 
voice." 



Moral: 




WMT reaches all the ducks and 
most of the people in Eastern 
Iowa. 



CEDAR RAPIDS 



Represented by The Katz Agency • Basic CBS Network • 600 kc • 5,000 watts 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



13 




in RADIO and TELEVISION 



daytime audience 




Nielsen Coverage Service, May, 1952, 
shows 410,570 daytime radio homes . . . 
30% more than comparable 1949 BMB figures. 

nighttime audience 




Total TV sets in 



ry 1, 1953 




Nielsen Coverage Service, May, 1952, 
shows 364,320 nighttime radio homes . . . 
11% more than comparable 1949 BMB figures. 



225,000 

an increase of 94% 

ever set count on 

January 1, 1952. 




JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and 
General Manager 




Nationally Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY AND CO] 



TV PIONEERING 

Thanks so very much for your TV 
pioneer editorial. This is timely and 
to the point and, most certainly, is ap- 
propriate as part of the current record. 
Incidentally, in connection with his- 
torical matters, I suppose you are 
aware of the efforts at Columbia Uni- 
versity and Pennsylvania State College 
to record the pioneers of radio as well 
as TV. Both schools are making an 
excellent start in that direction. 

John E. Fetzer 

President 

Fetzer Broadcasting Co. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 



That was a mighty interesting (and 
useful) round-up of TV pioneers in 
the current "Sponsor Speaks." Since 
you invited additional nominations, 
how about our boss, John H. Poole? 

John has been operating the only ex- 
perimental UHF station in the West 
for the last four years: KM2XAZ. He 
built it himself originally on the roof 
of his office in Long Beach, with as- 
sistance from the Stanford Research 
Institute. Later he moved it to the 
top of Signal Hill, and just last year 
to the top of Mount Wilson, a mile 
above Los Angeles. 

KM2XAZ telecasts regularly for spe- 
cific schedules. In addition to receiv- 
ers among technical men in both broad- 
casting and radio-television manufac- 
turing, John assured additional circu- 
lation for his tests by personally buy- 
ing and distributing free 500 conver- 
ters, mostly to "hams" who agreed to 
mail him regular reports of UHF re- 
ception in varying geographical and 
climactic conditions. 

Naturally all of us are highly grati- 
fied that the FCC granted the John 
Poole Broadcasting Co., Channel 22, 
Los Angeles, where we hope to be in 
operation with KPIK in September of 
1953. 

Robert J. McAndrews 
Commercial Manager 
KBIG 
Hollyivood 



Reading your excellent glossary of 
TV's pioneers, I was no little surprised 
to find that WSAZ-TV had been over- 
looked. 

From our beginnings in '48 to our 
commercial opening in '49 to our en- 
tering the long-distance micro-wave 
business in '50, we have had the un- 



mistakable feeling that we were pio- 
neering something! 

Ours was the first private relay sys- 
tem, bringing network television to the 
hinterlands, that was successful enough 
to be a permanent fixture. Today we 
are still very happy with it. WSAZ-TV 
was the first "full-scale" small-city TV 
station. We had no network, we had 
no audience — so, we opened up and 
learned to live with live studio and re- 
motes. WSAZ-TV is the first "high- 
power" post-freeze station, with our 84 
kilowatts on low-band channel 3 being 
the world's most powerful as early as 
last August. We have since pioneered 
a 100 kilowatts split audio video an- 
tennas directional array. 

Converting three separate local radio 
markets into a mass TV market of near- 
ly 150,000 television-equipped homes 
in the space of three and a half years 
has been so fraught with journeys into 
the unknown that now we scarcely rec- 
ognize a "normal" condition when we 
see it! 

WSAZ Radio will be 30 years old 
this year; WSAZ got its TV construc- 
tion permit five years ago this year in 
the absence of other venturesome souls. 
We may not be pioneers, but we have 
felt mighty like Daniel Boone peering 
into Eastern Kentucky on many oc- 
casions. 

L. H. Rogers 
Vice President 
WSAZ 
Huntington, W . Va. 



FARM RADIO DIRECTORS 

As agency for a large manufacturer 
of dairy and poultry feeds, we are 
vitally concerned with farm radio and 
its related directors and radio perso- 
nalities. 

In your 29 December issue you car- 
ried information on the National As- 
sociation of Radio Farm Directors and 
the stations concerned. 

Please send us complete information 
to enable us to become an associate 
member of this organization. If you 
have a complete list of stations and 
their radio farm directors, please send 
it to us. Also, any information con- 
cerning the functioning and organiza- 
tion of this association. 
John H. Miller 
Lloyd Mansfield Co., Advertising 
Buffalo 

• For information conrerninp membership in 
the National Ass'n of ltariio Farm Directors write 
to Chuck Worcester, WMT, Cedar Rapid*., Iowa. 



Li 



Soles'^" 



ScM^ H & Vll^ mR 




• 6:00 to 9:00 A. M. 

• 12:05 to 12:30 P. M. 

• MONDAY thru FRIDAY 



2 5 YEARS 
IN SCRANTON RADIO'S 

PROMOTION WHICH INCLUDES: j 

• Full Page Newspaper Ads j| 

• Dealer Mailings '? 

• Promotional Spots 2 

• Newspaper Listing ,< 

• Newspaper Publicity £ 
Coverage of 209,166 Radio | 
Homes ... A Radius of 38'/ 2 Miles 'f 

• ,< 

SOLID MARKET COVERA6e| 
. . . LOW RATES . . . AND THAT MAGIC j 
INGREDIENT . . . LOCAL SALES POWER! | 

Ask The Boiling Company for Details M 



yVQA* 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



15 




... 



Here's the guy people 
buy from in Memphis 

One of the truly great radio personalities in Memphis is 
Aubry Guy. 

Heard daily over WMC from 7:00 to 8:00 A.M., 
his bright chatter, and selected popular recordings make 
it the top morning show in Memphis. 

For 1 5 years, Aubry Guy has been synonymous with 
"seir in Memphis. 

Today his style is paying off 
bigger than ever before. 



r Selling Southern Style 



DIXIE 

Merry-Go-Roun 

featuring 

Aubry ' 

Memphis' leading disc jockey 
7:00-8:00 A.M. D 



Reprinted from the December 
10, 1952, issue of the Memphis 
Commercial Appeal. 



town, 
tan." 



MC 10 BROADCAST I 
SERVICE INTERVEWSi 



Far East Sailors Will Talk 
To Relatives 



During the Christmas holidays just past, Aubry Guy 
went to Korea. 

There, he made hundreds of recorded interviews 
with Memphis and Mid'South servicemen. 

He sent these recorded interviews back to play 
for the families of these servicemen throughout the 
Mid'South area, direct on his morning broadcasts. 

Merchandising features like this keep Aubry Guy 
and the Dixie MerryGcRound on top of the news, 
and in tune with the vast audience the program en' 
joys. 

If you have something to sell in Memphis, Aubry Guy 
'guy" to do the job. 



stone Age 
jat, sport- 
pespond- 
ling all 
arsonal, 




the 



WMC 

^ MEMPHIS^ 



NBC 5,000 WATTS 790 K.C. 

National representatives, The Branham Company 

WMGF 
WMGT 



260 KW Simultaneously 

Duplicating AM Schedule 

First TV Station in 

Memphis and the Mid-South 
Owned and Operated by The Commercial Appeal 



MERRY-GO-ROUND SHOW 

Aubrey Guy of WMC, WMCF and] 
WMCT, The Commercial Appealj 
stations, will report on his visits 
to Pearl Harbor on Dixie Merry- j 
Go-Round at 7 this morning on, 
WMC. 

Tomorrow morning on the same; 
program Mr. Guy will discuss his? 
trip to Wake Island, whose com- J 
mander at i 
the time if 
was at- 
tacked by 
the Japa- 
nese was 
Rear Admr 
W i n field 
Scott Cun- 
n i n gham 
(U. S. Navy 
retired ) of 
Memphis. 

Mr. Guy 
is m a king 
the trip 
with 
George Sis- 
report- 



For complete details as to availabilities on the Dixie Merry-Go-Round, con- 
tact your nearest Branham Office or write, wire or 'phone Earl Moreland, 
WMC, Memphis. 



16 



SPONSOR 



JVew and renew 




it 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



1. 



jVetc on Rttdio Networks 



2. 



4. 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


American Bakers Ass'n 


Poote, Cone & Belding 


CBS 


202 


Bcltonc Hearing Aid Co 


Olian & Bronner 


ABC 


108 


Brown Shoe Co 


Leo Burnett 


ABC 


167 


Consolidated Cosmetics 


Frank E. Duggan 


CBS 


201 


Eno, Scott & Bowne 


Atherton & Currier 


CBS 


201 


Falstaff Brewing Corp 


Dancer- Fitzgerald-Sample 


MBS 




Ferry-Morse Seed Co 
General Foods Corp 
Andrew Jergens Co 
Liggett & Myers 

1 Chesterfield) 
Skinner Mfg Co 
A. C. Weber Co 


McManus, John & Adams 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
Robert W. Orr 
Cunningham & Walsh 

Bozell & Jacobs 
Bozell & Jacobs 


CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
ABC 

ABC 
MBS 


202 
99 

295 

35 


J. R. Wood & Sons 


BBDO 


MBS 


554 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Bakers Starlight Theatre; Sun 6-6:30 pm; 22 Feb; 

52 wks 
Life Begins at 80; W 8:30-9 pm; -1 Feb; 50 wks 

(exc. 11 Feb I 
Smilin' Ed McConncll; Sat 10-10:30 am; 17 Jan; 

52 wks 
Arthur Godfrey; M-F alt days 10-10:15 am; 6 Jan; 

52 wks 
FBI in Peace 6 War; W 8-8:30 pm; 7 Jan; 52 wks 
Meet Millie; Th 8-8:30; 8 Jan; 52 wks 
Mr. Keen; F 8-8:30 pm; 9 Jan; 52 wks 
Came of the Day; daily, varying times, dep on st 

of game; to concl; thru 27 Sep 
Garden Gate; Sat 9:50-9:45 am; 21 Feb; 14 wks 
Robert Q. Lewis; M-F 4-4:05 pm; 21 Jan; 10 wks 
Time for Love; Th 9-9:30 pm; 15 Jan; 52 wks 
Les Griffith & News; M 7:55-8 pm; 26 Jan; 52 

No School Today; Sat 9:30-10 am; 28 Feb; 13 wks 
Queen for a Day; W 11:30-11:45 am seg; 21 Jan 

52 wks 
Linny Ross Show; Sun 1 .15-1 :30 pm; 1 Mar; 52 wks 



Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Campana Sales 
Christian Science Publ 

Society 
International Shoe Corp 
Longines-Wittnauer Watch 

Co 
Toni Co 

Toni Co 


Wallace, Ferry & Hanly 
Walton Bufferfield 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald 
Victor A. Bennett 

Leo Burnett 

Leo Burnett 


CBS 

ABC 

NBC 
CBS 

ABC 

ABC 


193 
32 

105 
163 

317 

122 


Bill Shadel News; Sat 11-11:05 am; 24 Jan; 52 wks 
Christian Science Monitor Views the News; T 9:45- 

10 pm; 24 Feb; 52 wks 
Howdy Doody; Sat 8:30-9:50 am; 21 Mar; 52 wks 
Symphonette; Sun 2-2:30 pm; 4 Jan; 52 wks 

Crime Letter from Dan Dodge; F 8-8:30 pm; 23 

Jan; 52 wks 
Tennessee Ernie; M,W,F 3:15-30 pm seg; 27 Jan; 

5? wks 



\ New National Spot Ratlio Rusiness 






SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET 


CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


American Chicle Co 


Dentyne chewing gum 


Dancer-Fitzgerald- 


Scattered mkts, na- 


Annct campaign; st 9 Feb; run 






Sample, NY 


tionwide 


thru early June 


Cuban Sugar Growers 


Sugar industry 


Cunningham & Walsh, 


150 mkts 


Annct campaign; st April; 39 


Assoc. 




NY 




wks 


Dale Dance Schools 


Social dancing 


William Warren, lack- 


NY, Chi, S.F., Bos- 


Parties; also 10-min musical 






son & Delaney, NY 


ton, Mpls, Wash, 
D.C., Baltimore, 
Newark, Phila 


progs; daytime wkends only; 
tests; campaign in each city 
depends on results 


Carrett & Co 


Virginia Dare Wine 


David Mahoney, NY 


80 scattered mkts 


1-min e.t.'s in & around male- 
interest progs; st early Feb; 
about 10 wks 


Kiplinger Washington 


"Changing Times" 


Albert-Frank-Cuenther 


20 scattered mkts 


1 -min parties in early am progs; 


Agency 


mag 


Law, NY 




end of Jan beg of Feb; 1-wk 
campaign 


Penick & Ford Ltd 


My-T-Fine desserts 


BBDO, NY 


30 radio mkts 


Anncts; st mid-Feb; 13 wks 


Rexall Drug Co 


Rexall products 


Ronalds Adv Agency, 


French-language stns, 


Anncts; 3 times wkly; st Jan: 






Ltd, Toronto 


eastern Canada 


run 1 yr 


Sinclair Refining 


Gasoline 


Morey Humm & John- 
stone, NY 


Mkts in distrib areas 


Annct campaign early am time; 
st early Mar; run thru '53 


Swift & Co 


Jewel shortening 


J. Walter Thompson, 
Chi 


35 southern mkts 


15-min Ernest Tubbs prog; 3 
times wkly; 2 Feb thru 1 
May 



National Rroadcast Sales Executives 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Herbert Bachman 
Max E. Buck 
Guy Capper 
Charles Cassidy 
Milton Chapman 
Bun Clapperton 
James C. Cole 
Ralph Davidson 
George S. Dietrich 
Jack B. Donahue 
Wilson Edwards 
Robert R. Flanagan 
Jack Frazier 



Headley-Reed, LA, dir prom & res 

King's Super Markets, sis & adv mgr 

ABC TV Spot Sales, NY, sis stf 

KLX, Oakland, acct exec 

WABI, Bangor, Me, asst local sis mgr 

KPOA, Honolulu, acct exec 

WJER, Dover, Ohio, mgr 

KSL-TV, Salt Lake City, acct exec 

NBC Spot Sales, NY. sis stf 

KNX-CPRN, LA, acct exec 

KSDO, San Diego, acct exec 

WQAN, Scranton, Pa, mdsg stf 

WLW, WLWT. Cinci, TV mdsg exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 



KPIX, LA, dir sis prom & pub 

WNBC-WNBT, NY. dir mdsg, adv, sis prom 

Headley-Reed TV, NY, acct exec 

KCO, SF, acct exec 

Same, local sis mgr 

KONA, Honolulu, dir local sis 

WFTV, Duluth, Minn, stn & sis mgr 

KCMB-TV. Honolulu, local sis mgr 

Same. Eastern sis mgr 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, SF, acct exec 

Same, asst mgr 

Same, mdsg dir 

Same, dir of mdsg 



In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network and Spot); 
Station Representation Changes; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 








Numbers niter names 
refei to \ in- and Re- 
new categor \ 

Welvin B. II right I I) 
4. V. Sedgwick I li 
Ralph Davidson i 1 1 
Craig Waudsle) i 1 1 
G. T. Lincoln (4) 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



17 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



Xetr find renew 



NAME 




pr «¥ ' (pf 



r AR- 






Joseph Coodfcllow 
Frank Crindley 
Coorge C. Hatch 
Hal W. Hoag 
Ned Hullinger 
Frank Hunt 
Ceorge Hurst 
Ceorge Jeneson 
C. Oilman Johnston 
Norman Kay 
David M. Kimel 
DiA King 
Francis T. King 
Nona Kirby 
Ceorge A. Koehler 
Edward Larkin 
Cregory T. Lincoln 
Ed Lytle 

Robert C. McCausland 
Harry K. McWilliams 
Paul H. Martin 
Craig Maudsley 
Lynn L. Meyer 
Dean Milburn 
William Miller 
Tom Morris 
Wirren M. Morton 
Bill Murray 
Jack Paige 
Bob Reitzel 
Elzey M. Roberts Jr 
Arthur M. Sedgwich 
Harold P. See 
Mike Shapi-o 
Ceorpe T. Shupert 
Manning Slater 
Carleton D. Smith 
Kenneth W. Stowman 
Tom Swaffo'd 
C. Merritt Trott 
Henry Unte-meyer 
Willia~> S. Vernon 
Bert West 
Harry Wheeler 
Peter Wood 
Melvin B W-iijht 
William R. Wyatt 
l"nins |. Zolo 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NBC Spot Sales, NY, eastern radio sis mgr 

ABC, NY, ABC stn clearance de->t 

Intermountain Net, Salt Lake City, pres 

Free Cr Peters, NY, western mgr 

ABC Western Div, Hywd, mgr stn rels 

Reinhard Bros, Mpls, adv, sis prom mgr 

KCBS, SF, natl sis rep 

WOR, WOR-TV, NY, midwest sis mgr 

WBBM, Chi, asst sis mgr 

KSDO, San Diego, acct exec 

WLAW, Lawrence, Mass, sis stf 

WLOL, Mpls, sis stf 

KIKI. Honolulu, sis prom mgr 

WLAW, Lawrence, Mass, sis exec 

WFIL, Philadelphia, radio sis dir 

CBS, Spot Radio & TV Sales, LA, mgr 

WPIX, NY, sis rep 

Western Adv Agency, LA, acct exec 

U.S. Air Corps, captain 

Columbia Pictures, NY, exploitation mgr 

KFXM, San Bernardino, Cal, natl sis mgr 

Own ad agency, Seattle & LA 

Intermountain Net, Salt Lake City, vp 

Free & Peters, Chi, acct exec 

WCBS, NY, sis mgr 

Bozell & Jacobs, Mpls, exec 

WOR-TV, NY, acct exec 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, NY, sis rep 

Intermountain Net, Salt Lake City, cp 

CPRN, SF, mgr 

KXOK, St Louis, vo 

KAHU, Waipahu, Oahu, vp, gen mgr 

KRON-TV, SF, dir TV 

WFAA-TV, Dallas, exec 

Pee-less TV Prodns, NY, vp 

W1CC, WICC-TV, Bridgeport, Conn, vp chg sis 

NBC o&o Stn Ooers, vp & dir 

WFIL-TV, Phila, TV sis dir 

KCBS, SF, acct exec 

WBAL, WBAL-TV, Bait, sis stf 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, NY, acct exec 

WABD, NY, acct exec 

CPRN, NY, rep 

WCOP, Boston, comml mgr 

Real estate broker, Juneau, Alaska 

KSL, KSL-TV, Salt Lake City, exec 

Forioe & Co, vp chg midwest div 

MRC TV Not Sales, NY, act exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 



WRC. WNBW, Washmgton, DC, dir sis 

Headiey-Reed, NY, acct exec 

Same, chmn bd dir 

Same, vp 

ABC, NY, regl mgr radio-TV stn rels depts 

KSTP, Mpls. acct exec 

CBS Radio Soot Sales, LA, mgr 

Also KHJ-TV, LA, midwest sis mgr 

CBS Radio Spot Sales. NY, acct exec 

Same, mgr Lawrence sis office 

Same, sis mgr 

KSTP-TV. Mpls, acct exec 

KONA, Honolulu, acct exec 

Same, natl sis mgr 

Same, asst to gen mgr 

CBS TV Spot Sales, mgr LA office 

WLW-T, Cinci, s!s rep NY office 

KFXM, San Bernardino, Cal, acct exec 

WABI, Bangor, Me, acct exec 

Screen Cems, NY, dir adv & pub rel 

Same, gen sis mgr 

KONA, Honolulu, dir natl sis 

Same, pres 

Same, mgr Ft. Worth office 

WBBM, Chi, sis mgr 

KSTP, Mpls, acct exec 

ABC TV Sales, NY, acct exec 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, NY, acct exec WCBS 

Same, exec vo 

KNX-CPRN. Eastern sis rep, NY hq CBS Radio Spot Sales 

Same, pres 

KCMB, Honolulu, local sis mgr 

KRON-TV & FM, stn mgr 

KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Tex, comml mgr 

United Artists TV Corp, NY, vp & gen mgr 

Same, bus & s!s mgr 

Also WNBW, WRC, Washington, DC, mgr 

WFIL, WFIL-TV, Phila, gen sis mgr 

CBS Radio Soot Sales, SF, acct exec 

WBAL-TV, asst sis mgr 

WCBS, NY, sis mgr 

Blair-TV, NY, acct exec 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, SF, mgr 

WLAW, Lawrence, Mass. regl sis mgr 

KONA, Honolulu, icct exec 

KCMB. KCMB-TV. Honolulu, mdsg dir 

Ceorge W. Clark, Chi, vp chg eastern div 

Prlwa-d Pet-v. Chi, TV sis stf 



5. 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Clark T. Ames 
R. Craig Campbell 
Fredrick C. Egloff 

C. F. Greenwood 
Alvin F. Criesedieck Jr 
A. J. Hammer 
Alfred J. Hughes 
Ceorge B. Koch 
Walter Lefebre 
Joseph T. Lewis 
Cy Nussdorf 
Harvey Orkin 
M. W. Osborne 
Embanuel Sacks 
Timothy J. Stone 
Andrew H. Talbot Jr 
John G. Weaver 
Ceorge Weissman 
R. Bruce Wightman 



|l 



Philip Morris, vp chg prodn 
Lever Bos, NY, asst to sis vp 
Acoustical Prods Div, Natl Cypsum Co, 

Buffalo, ad mgr 
Pabst Sales Co, Chi, eastern div sis mgr 
Falstaff Brewing Corp, St. Louis, asst adv mgr 
RCA Victor, Camden, asst to dir regl offices 
Eversharp, west coast div mgr, hq LA 
B. F. Goodrich, Cleve, agric chem stf rep 
Sylvania Electric, radio-TV div, district sis mg: 
Toni Co. Chi, brand manager Prom 
Alfred Dunhill of London, adv mgr 
Own public rels firm 
B. F. Goodrich, Clevel, adv mgr 
RCA, NY. stf vp 

John Mather Lupton, NY, acct exec 
Chi Herald-Amer, Chi, prom mgr 
Swift & Co, Chi, adv mgr 
Philip Morris, NY, asst to pres 
Falstaff B'ewing Corp, St. Louis, asst gen sis mg. 



NEW AFFLIATION 



Same, bd dir 

Same, asst natl accts sis mgr 

Sylvania Electric, Buffalo, radio & TV adv stf 

Same, eastern regl sis mgr 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, mgr SW region, hq Dallas 

Same, regl mgr SW sis region, hq Dallas 

Same, adv mgr 

Same, dir new TV mkt devel 

Same, brand superv all perm wave prods 

Lewal Industrial, NY, adv mgr 

Lewal Industries, NY, natl sis mgr 

Sams, intl sis mgr 

Same, mgr RCA Victor record dept 

Lever Bros, NY, asst brand adv mgr Surf & Swan 

Pabst Brewing Co. Chi. pub rel dir 

Crosley Div, Avco, Cinci, mgr adv, sis prom 

Same, vp 

Same, gen sis mgr 



6. 



\eic Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR 



M. A. Bruder & Sons, Phila 

Colorglo Products, LA 

Consolidated Sewing Machine Supply Co, NY 

G. C. Inc. San Gabriel, Cal 

Jerant Co, Cal 

Kaiser-Frazer Corp, Willow Run, Mich 

Kaiser-Frazer Corp, Willow Run, Mich 

Oshkorh B-ewing Co, Oshkosh, Wis 

Radio & Television, NY 

Regal Amber B'ewing Co. SF 



PRODUCT (or service) 



Paints, building & maintenance materials 

Automobile polishes ( Slick glaze cream) 

Viking sewing machines 

Pinwae home permanent 

Formula "21" Lanolin Compound 

Kaiser-Frazer autos 

Kaiser-Frazer autos 

Beer 

Brunswick radio & TV receivers 

Regal Pale Beer 





AGENCY 




Abner 


J. Celula 6 Assoc, 


Phila 


Philip 


J. Meany Co. LA 




Ben E 


aldwin Adv, Hywd 




Byron 


H. Brown & Staff, 


LA 


Ben E 


aldwin Adv, Hywd 




Wm. 


1. Weintraub, NY 




Wcst- 


Marquis. LA (Pacific Coast area! 


C. Wendel Meunch & Co 


Chi 


Weiss 


& Celler. NY 




Guild. 


Bascom & Bonfigli. 


SF 



fc 



^ 



Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 

II. Untermcyer (4) 
C. G. Johnston (4) 
Mike Shapiro (4) 

Elzey M. Roberts (4) 
Geo. T. Shupert (4) 

William Miller 
Merritt Trott 
A. J. Hushes 
1 1 hi i ey Orkin 
Cy Nussdorf 




SPONSOR 




Move your merchandise 



ri 



eht 



now: 



In Seattle you need Salemaker Jr. — the thrifty 
spot saturation plan — to move your merchandise. 
Call or wire KRSC National Sales or our nearest 
rep for complete details. 




sells ALL the big 
Seattle Market 



Represented by: 

EAST: Geo. W. Clark, Inc. 

WEST: Lee F. O'Connell Co. 
Los Angeles 
Western Radio Sales 
San Francisco 






It takes time to sell goods today. It takes 
network radio time to sell goods to the most 
people. And it takes time on the plus network 
to sell goods to the most people at the lowest 
cost. These simple facts are attested by some 
of the best minds in marketing, with some of 
the biggest (and some of the smallest) budgets 
in the business: last year they hired 17% 
more of our time than in 1951! Behind this 
expert testimony, you'll find two key reasons 
why it pays clients to spend time with us. 



CAKES TIME 



First, the 60,000,000 people living in Non-TV 
America spend twice as much time tuned to our 
stations as to anybody else's. And second, we 
price our time by a new, unique formula* that 
keeps costs synchronized with actual values 
— in TV areas as well as in the rest of the U. S. 
Small wonder Mutual sponsors so consistently 
convert time-pennies into sales-dollars! We can 
demonstrate how you can, too ... in no time. 




MUTUAL 

the PLL T S netw ovk 

of oQo sta tions 



'Effective Jan. 1, 1953. Details on request. 



EVER , 
Y A CITY? 




WEMP 

and found 

Milwaukeeans 

prefer • 



MUSIC 



Another reason for the year 'round 
popularity WEMP enjoys in homes, 
stores, offices, clubs and cars — day 
and night. 



NEWS 



They get plenty on WEMP. Thirty 
times daily, prepared by Milwaukee's 
second largest radio news department 



SPORTS 



More play-by-play sports broadcasts 
12 months in the year than any other 
Milwaukee station. In addition, Earl 
Gillespie, Wisconsin's favorite, does 
™ three sportscasts daily. 

^ They add up to consistently high 
ratings all year long. Remember, for 
$100 to $300 per week, or more, a WEMP 
spot campaign delivers 2 to 2'/2 times 
more audience per dollar than any net- 
work station in town.* Call Headley- 
Reed! 

' Be i i 'Hi latest available Hooper 
Comprehensive an. I sit ,v lis rales. 

IHfiDP 



MILWAUKEE'S 

24-HR. A DAY 

STATION 




fcSpiaf 



Herman A. Ktiiz 

V.P. & sales director 
Jacob Rupport Brewery 

The man who is a key figure in the Ruppert comehack team started 
his selling career at the age of 13. After a year of supplying his 
classmates' and neighbors' stationery needs, Herman shifted his sell- 
ing ability to liquid refreshments, becoming the lone drummer for 
the Country Club Soda Co. of Springfield, Mass. — a business owned 
by his father who also drove the firm's horse and wagon. Herman 
is still busy selling, but it would take an endless procession of horses 
to haul the quantity of beer sold today by the Jacob Ruppert Brewery. 

Sales figures tell the story: Net income for nine months of 1952, 
$1,373,198, versus $685,979 in same period of 1951. Quite a change 
from the net loss of $1,662,465 in 1949. To keep this trend moving in 
the right direction Ruppert will pour 70' i of its $3,000,000 ad bud- 
get in 1952 into radio and TV advertising. 

Two keys opened the door to success: the development of a new 
beer called Knickerbocker ( which while light enough for modern 
tastes still retains the full flavor of the ingredients) and the selling 
techniques used successfully by Katz in New England. (See "How 
Ruppert wooed the women and won," sponsor, 20 October 1952.) 

As he puts it. "I've seen the reaction of the average person to some 
of the wilder advertising claims, and I want no part of it. We say 
three things for Knickerbocker: That it's extra light, frosty dry, and 
less filling — all three of which can be easily proved by anyone just 
by drinking Knickerbocker beer. And I can't think of a better way 
to sell than by using the human voire; that means radio and TV. 

"Take, for instance, our recent efforts with Ruppiner. our dark 
beer which has quadrupled sales in the past year. We knew that this 
beer would have particular appeal to the foreign element of New 
York City. So, as you have so often advocated in sponsor, we 
turned to foreign language radio and now advertise Ruppiner in 
Polish, German, and Yiddish over specialized urograms." 

A graduate of S1IK (school of hard knocks). Herman abandoned 
formal education at the age of 15 and working with bis father for the 
nexl 17 years developed the Country Club Soda Co. into one of the 
leaders in its field in New England. He became sales agent lor 
Rupperl in L936 and was so successful in his territory that the parent 
company ca'led on him when it got bogged down in red ink in 1949. 

Although be puts in a strenuous week in New York, Herman always 
heads for home in Rrookline. Mass., on Friday afternoon^. * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 




Storer Broadcasting Company 
TOM HARKER NAT. SALES MGR 488 MADISON AVI NEW YORK 



Represented Nationally 
by KATZ 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



FACTS ABOUT 



T 



u 



IN LOS ANGELES 



Baseball in '53 

EXCLUSIVE RADIO 
BROADCAST 

on 

KFWB 

The Hollywood Stars 
Pacific Coast ->*** 

Champions r™^ 



1952 
Pulse Ratings 
gave 

KFWB 

Play-by-play 

Baseball broadcasts 

with Mark Scott 

THE 

HIGHEST BASEBALL 
RATINGS 

in Southern California 



COST 
PER THOUSAND 
AS LOW AS 
46c 

Available for whole 
or part sponsorship 



Contact today 



BRAHHAM 
COMPANY 



27m® 

of service in 

America's 

IHIRO IARGIST 

MARKET 



NIW tO«K 

CHICAGO 

SAN r«*ncisco 

LOS AKOtli* 

CHAALOTTf , 

OITIOIt 
MIANTA 
MIMPH4S 
i ST. lOUIt 
1 DALLAS 



lO S A 



NC ELES 



HARRY MAIZUSH 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 




"Tintair learns front Toni" 
15 January 1951, p. 30 



See: 
Issue: 

SllblCCt* R e fi nan ced home hair-coloring linn 
returns to network television 



The newly packaged, streamlined Tintair which hit the market 
some six months ago may be a horse of a different color, but the 
management of Bymart-Tintair is as convinced of the power of TV 
as it was in 1951, at the time of its all-out TV campaigns. At that 
early beginning of the new product's history, the firm invested close 
to $4,000,000 in advertising, allotting most of the 1951 budget to its 
two prestige shows — Meet Frank Sinatra on CBS Radio and Somerset 
Maugham Theatre on NBC TV. After an initial unprecedented up- 
surge in sales, the company found that it was overextended. 

Today, after a reorganization, Tintair has refinanced to the tune 
of $300,000 (from Board Chairman Martin L. Straus II and his 
partner, Carl Byoir), with further financial backing to be raised 
from stockholders. 

Tintair is again seriously courting TV. Dave Garroway's Today 
(NBC) and John Reed King's There's One in Every Family (CBS) 
are the two programs which will be used for the firm's test run. 
Mitchell Finlay, Tintair advertising director, as well as Ruthrauff & 
Ryan (Tintair's agency since 1 January 1953) both feel confident 
that TV will jack up Tintair sales to the product's earlier aspirations. 

Says Martin Oeehsner, Ruthrauff & Ryan A/E: "We feel TV has 
the greatest impact for our type of product, and it's safe to say that 
we will be heavily in TV during the coming year." 

Merchandising of Tintair's five-minute participations in the afore- 
mentioned shows is still in the discussion stages. Agency and man- 
agement confidence in both programs notwithstanding, sales resulting 
from these participations will determine the length of Tintair's initial 
TV run. In the meantime, both Mitchell Finlay and R&R are busily 
shopping around for a show Tintair can sponsor as its own. "We are 
planning to sponsor our own program again," Tintair's ad director 
explains, "as soon as we find the right vehicle." 



"Wrigley's 25 years in radio" 

17 November 1952, p. 29 
1 December 1952, p. 26 

SllbjCCt: Radio rate slash saves Wriglev 
$500,000 

Consistently the highest network radio user among gum firms and 
consistently largest gum seller, Wrigley expects that 1953 will be 
radio cut-rate year for the company with no change in programing. 
Attributing the revisions in Wrigley's 1953 ad budget to net radio's 
nighttime rate slash last fall, Advertising Manager Henry L. Webster 
hopes that Wrigley will be able both to stay in its position of suprem- 
acy and leave its radio scheduling unimpaired at a cost of some 
$500,000 less than in 1952. As figures below show, radio will stay on 
I "I i as getting t lie largest slice of Wrigley's ad budget: 








1952 


1953 


Network i 


'UtiiO 


82.500.000 


$2,000,000 


Newspapers 




1.240.000 


1,950,000 


Outdoor 




1,650,000 


1,850,000 


Car cards 




1,000,000 


1,500,000 


Network Tl 




800,000 


800,000 


Magazines 




350,000 


600,000 



Total 



7,540,000 



8. 700,000 



24 



SPONSOR 




In Kentucky, there's an EASIER ™ 

way to pick the radio winner! 

In Kentucky, a tremendous part of our total buying power 
is crowded into a relatively small region. 

Yes, 51.3% of Kentucky's food sales, 59.8% of its drug sales and 
55.3% of its total retail sales are made in the area 
covered by WAVE alone! To reach the remainder, you need 
many of the State's other 46 radio stations. 

That's why WAVE continues to get the cream of so many 
"radio-in-Kentucky" budgets — much of it on an exclusive basis. 



Ask Free & Peters for all the facts. 



5000 WATTS 



NBC 



WAVE 

LOUISVILLE 




Free & Peters, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



25 



-^ 




No other advertising medium in the Carolinas digs 
so deep as radio — no other radio station in the 
Carolinas equals WBT's total coverage. With WBT 
and imaginative, experienced Doug Mayes on your 
staff, you can spade up sales in fields relatively 
untouched by other Carolina advertising media. 



COLOSSUS OF THE CAROLINAS 




CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



Represented Nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



I 



BRUARY 1953 



^Li> 



Robert II. O'Brien, 
lltC Executive V.P. 

Comes out oj I nited Paramount 

Theatres where he is secretary- 
treasurer and u director. II ill 
remain secretary and a v. p. oj 
the parent company in addition 
to exec c./'. post with the ABC 
division. Born Helena. Mont.. 
1904, he is an attorney and a 
former commissioner of Se- 
curities Exchange Commission. 
Joined Paramount Pictures Inc. 
in 1945, was secretary of com- 
pany from 1916 through its 
1949 dissolution by court action 



/.citii«."(l II. fioltlenson, 
AB-PT President 

Was elected president of ' nited 
Paramount Theatres in January 
L950. Pom in Scottsdale, Pa., 
1905, graduate ol II an aid Col- 
lege and Harvard Law School. 
Placed in charge of theatre op- 
erations for Paramount Pictures 
in 1941. became a v. p. in 1942. 
Is first vice president of Theatre 
Owners of America. Active in 
charities, he was co-founder of 
United Cerebral Patsy Ass n in 
lVi9, nas been elected its presi- 
dent for each year since then 



Itobert I . Kininer. 

ABC President 

Has been president of IBC 
suite 29 Decembei L949. Came 
to the nelu orh us n wc< presi 
dent in L944, shortly after Ed- 
ward J . \oble bought it from 
III I. lids in charge of pub- 
licity, war news coverage until 
1916 when he bet ante exec. i.p. 
Born in Stroudsburg, Pa., in 
1909. From 1939 through 1911 
he wrote a newspaper column 
with Joseph Alsop. Entered the 
in in | in 1941, discharged as 

military intelligence lieut. col. 



ABC - HPT merger: its 



meaning to advertisers 



J^_s this issue of sponsor went to press, a deci- 
sion from the FCC approving the merger plans 
of the American Broadcasting Co. and United 
Paramount Theatres seemed imminent. Coming 
after literally years of negotiation (ABC first 
sought a company to merge with as early as 
1947), the biggest development in network 
broadcasting since the separation of ABC from 
RCA in 1943 was thought to be all but official. 

What would the merger mean to advertisers 
and to the radio and television industry? What 
changes were imminent? To get the answers 
SPONSOR has been at work for months, studying 
the two companies, the problems they face, and 

9 FEBRUARY 1953 



the lengthy record of their testimony before the 
FCC. Out of this study emerged a report which 
starts on the following pages. It is broken down 
under key topics and written in question-and- 
answer style. Though gathered without access to 
official statements from executives of the merged 
companies (because it was written before they 
were free to speak), it represents the best in- 
formed analysis possible till now of where AB- 
PT is headed. It covers topics which range from 
the broad significance of the merger to such spe- 
cific matters as will the network launch produc- 
tion of its own TV films. It includes biographic 
sketches of five key AB-PT executives. 



27 



► ► 



SIGNIFICANCE 



f$. Illicit will be the broad effects of 
the merger on the radio and television 
industry and on advertisers? 
A. Competition will be heightened. For 
the first time since its inception as a 
si parate network in 1943, ABC will 
have the resources to play in the same 
league as NBC and CBS. United Para- 
mount, with some $31 millions in 
working capital, is in a position to 
make substantial programing, person- 
nel, and facilities investments. 

The merged company will now be 
able to enter the market to buy name 
talent, including top comedians. It 
will use a strengthened program line- 
up as a lever in acquiring new affiliates. 
The network has been hampered to 
date because it I rails NBC and CBS in 
number of affiliates having broad cov- 
erage. It will seek to attract major sta- 
tions in both radio and television. 

If the merged company succeeds in 
its objectives, present ABC advertisers 
will be the first to gain in terms of in- 
creased audience and coverage. All 
advertisers who are prospective net- 
work sponsors will gain since they will 
have a wider range of choice. 

Short-range effects of the merger 
might include: ll) A change in the 
pattern of TV station clearance: ABC 
( as well as Du Mont I have been at a 
disadvantage in vying with NBC and 
CBS lor clearance of programs in one. 
two, and three-station markets: with a 
stronger programing line-up. AB-PT 
may be able to wrest more clearances 
from its two chief competitors. (2 I 
Keener competition from AB-PT will 
in turn stimulate the oilier TV net- 



works, already beset by complaints 
about program cliches, to increased 
program efforts. 

Radio, in particular, may gain 
si rength from the merger. ABC has 
been a weak link in bargaining for 
billing, hovering close to the red as 
it has in the recent past. With fresh 
money to invest on programing and 
facilities, the network will be able to 
function as a rate-card operation, elim- 
inating special deals with science. 



I 



BACKGROUND 



€|. What led up to the merger'/ 
A. ABC had long been looking foi 
means of competing on the level of 
NBC and CBS. It realized television 
would add to its need for heavy capi- 
tal, bad been seeking a company to 
merge with since 1947. Over several 
years ABC entered discussions with 
two movie producers, a record com- 
pany, an electronics firm, and with 
CBS. It was seeking primarily a com- 
pany; which had show-business experi- 
ence and knowhow, a good earning 
record, and adequate capital. 

Negotiations with CBS were aban- 
doned when executives of both com- 
panies came to the conclusion that mer- 
ger of the two networks would not be 
in the public interest. Other negotia- 
tions ended in disagreement over price. 
Finally. ABC approached United Para- 
mount Theatres early in 1951. 

UPT had been interested in broad- 
casting long before this point. It owned 
an outstanding TV station in Chicago. 
\\ BKB. through its subsidiarv. Bala- 
ban & Katz. It was awaiting the end 




of the freeze to renew its application 
for channels in four other markets. The 
company was also familiar with radio 
operations through partial ownership 
of WSMB, New Orleans. Accordingly, 
the ABC proposal was received by UPT 
with high interest. 

On 23 May 1951 agreement to merge 
the two companies was formalized, 
jiending FCC approval. FCC hearings 
began in January 1951, lasted through 
April. Until a decision no steps could 
be taken to effect the merger other than 
policy discussions on top management 
level between the two companies. All 
direct steps were frozen. 



PERSONNEL 



Ali-I'T wilt make film shows lor television to compete with other nets now that it has new 
financial resources. Production will probably take place ill 4BI -owned Vitagraph lot above 



Q. Who are the key executives of the 
merged company? 

A. Leonard H. Goldenson, president of 
UPT. becomes president of the new 
company, to be known as American 
Broadcasting-Paramount Theatres. Ed- 
ward J. Noble, chairman of the board 
and chief stockholder of ABC. remains 
active in the merged company as chair- 
man of its finance committee. Robert 
E. Kintner, presently president of ABC, 
remains as president of the merged net- 
work, to be known as the American 
Broadcasting Division. The executive 
vice president of the network will come 
out of UPT. He is Robert H. O'Brien, 
secretary-treasurer and a director of 
UPT. He will serve as financial vice 
president and secretary of the merged 
companies, though turning over his du- 
ties as treasurer to another officer of 
the company. 

Vice president in charge of program- 
ing at the network will be Robert M. 
Weitman, now vice president of UPT. 
Earl J. Hudson, president of United 
Detroit Theatres. Michigan subsidiary 
of UPT. will be vice president in 
charge of the West Coast operations of 
the network. John Mitchell, now op- 
erating head of WBKB. will manage 
the Chicago operations for the network. 

Q. What are the facts concerning trade 
speculation that Kintner s role is tem- 
porary? 

A. Throughout the lengthy FCC pro- 
ceedings. Kintner was the chief witness 
for ABC. He pointed out to the FCC 
that the merger yvas undertaken with 
the desire that he and Edward Noble 
remain active in the new company. It 
is unlikely under the circumstances that 
his role is that of caretaker until UPT 



28 



SPONSOR 



can familiarize itself with network op- 
erations. Kintner, it looks certain, will 
play the top roll at ABC during the pe- 
riod of adjustment and rebuilding. 

IJ. What will happen to other execu- 
tives of ABC? 

A. Probably most of them will remain 
in their posts. At least until the merged 
organization is running smoothly there 
will probably be no major changes. 
Any other comment now on executive 
additions and subtractions is in the 
realm of speculation. No one knows. 



111111111111111 "I"""" iii""""iii""iiiiiiiiiiiii.::. . . ,11111111 ,. mm 111 iiiiini mn 



PHILOSOPHY 



Q. With what basic beliefs are the ex- 
ecutives of UPT coming into the net- 
work operation? 

A. First, UPT executives have strong 
faith in radio. They feel that it has 
never reached its full potential as a me- 
dium and are confident that it will 
continue to play an important role in 
home entertainment. They see the ra- 
dio audience not in terms of a mass 
but in terms of a series of minorities 
adding up to a mass audience. They 
will probably attempt to appeal to the 
minority audiences through specialized 
programing. 

By minority audiences they mean 
housewives in the kitchen, people in 
automobiles, special-interest groups. 
When asked about his view of the fu- 
ture of radio before the FCC, Leonard 
Goldenson cited figures on the more 
than 20 million automobile radios and 
multiple radio sets as important fac- 
tors in his faith in radio's future. He 
noted that radio set sales were running 
ahead of television sets and that the 
low cost of small radio sets had made 
it possible for radio to follow the lis- 



This story based on months of analysis 

This article is based on months of study of the 
FCC hearings record concerning the ABC-UPT 
merger, on exhaustive analysis of UPT and its 
key personnel. It was written last week when the 
official announcement of the merger seemed immi- 
nent. But because sponsor went to press before 
the actual announcement, and both ABC and UPT 
wished to avoid anything prejudicial to the out- 
come of the hearing, the article was prepared 
without going to officials of either company for 
statements or comments. We believe this the most 
practical interpretation of ivhat to expect from 
AB-PT that can be available at this time. 




Robert M. Weitman, 
Programing V'.P. 

Is managing (lira tar of New York 
Paramount Theatre he is credited 
with developing many stars, includ- 
ing Frank Sinatra, liditin K;\c. Red 
Skeltdn. He entered t'/iramounl's 

Managers Training School in 1928 
after graduating from Cornell I nil . 



t( ner as he moves around in his home. 

UPT executives approach television 
from the point of view that more can 
come out of the tube than what we're 
seeing now. They hope to make the 
new ABC a mecca for creative talent 
interested in developing new program- 
ing forms and high-level entertainment 
of every type. 

They don't mean to indicate by stat- 
ing these objectives that they are plan- 
ning to leave practical considerations 
behind. High on their list of program- 
ing objectives is acquisition of a line- 
up of top-rated comedy shows. But 
they will attempt to keep their pro- 
graming line-up well balanced with em- 
phasis on news and public-service. 

Development of new talent for TV 
will probably get major attention from 
the AB-PT program planners. UPT's 
major outlet in New York, the Para- 
mount Theatre, has long been known 
as the birth place of dozens of enter- 
tainment careers and its manager, Rob- 
ert M. Weitman, will be vice president 
in charge of programing for AB-PT. 



PROGRAMING 



:■:• 



Q. What specific plans are there for 
bolstering ABC radio programing:? 
A. Specific plans are being kept under 
cover for competitive reasons and be- 
cause AB-PT is not vet readv to com- 



Earl J. Hutlson, 

V.P. Charge of West Const 

Now President and General Man- 
ager of I I'T theatres in Detroit. 
he has had long experience on the 
(.nasi, litis been an \l(, 1/ producer 
and written movies. If as publisher 
ill Motion I'iitiirr \fews. Joined De- 
troit thenars division of I I' I l<)31 



init itself to a particular programing 
approach. It is possible that one of the 
important benefits to AB-PT radio pro- 
graming will come through the net- 
work's hoped for acquisition of TV 
comedy stars. ABC was a leader in use 
of transcribed programing in radio. 
AB-PT might well follow suit with 
taped shows produced in conjunction 
with its prospective new television fare. 
This would give AB-PT radio program- 
ing a boost at low cost. 

It's probable that intense effort will 
be expended in developing programing 
on the network designed to fit the 
needs of housewives and travelers in 
automobiles — in effect what indepen- 
dent stations have done, though not 
necessarily using the same d.j.-type 
format. Music, news will get emphasis. 

Q. What about, television? 
A. AB-PT plans are probabl) not set as 
far as television is concerned. But it's 
apparent that acquiring top corned} 
stars gets first priority. From the im- 
portance attached to comedians it 
would appear that comics not signed 
up b\ the other networks will be the 
target for capital gains or other offers 
Irom AB-PT. Moreover, the network's 
top echelon is confident that it can de- 
velop its own comedy talent. Famous 
stage personalities who were dcxeloped 
under the direction of Robert Weitman 
{Please turn to page 90) 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



29 






Willys moves into high society 

Reentering passenger-ear field, 50-year-old auto firm, never a big air user, 
now spends $1,800,000 for prestige and eulture on radio and TV 



WW hen Willys-Overland Motors re- 
entered the passenger car market last 
year with a low-price economy car, the 
Aero-Willys, instead of trying to reach 
the mass market with popular air en- 
tertainment, it threw the classiest pro- 
graming on radio and TV at its poten- 
tial customers. 

At first glance, this high-tone air 
strategy seemed like a wild pitch. 
Wasn't Willys-Overland taking a big 
chance? As it is, there is probably no 
greater gamble in the U. S. business 
world than the introduction of an auto- 
mobile. A huge capital investment is 
required; existing auto firms with mil- 
lions of cars on the road have a big 
edge in the all-important replacement 
market; competition for good dealers 
is keen; challenging the automotive 
goliaths, Chrysler, Ford, and General 
Motors, is considered nothing less than 
audacious. So an amateur might con- 
clude that mass appeal is the answer. 

But admen close to the auto business 



consider the cultural tone of Willys- 
Overland air advertising a smart move, 
feel that it is part of a carefully con- 
trived sales plan. After all, it has been 
pointed out, it isn't likely that Willys- 
Overland moved hastily. The firm has 
been talking passenger cars ever since 
World War II ended. 

What, then, is the thinking behind 
the programing which attempts to leave 
the impression that if you appreciate 
the finer things in life, you'll appreci- 
ate the Aero-Willys? Here is how 
Willys-Overland looks at the situation: 

One of the biggest barriers to clear 
in introducing a new car is the con- 
sumer psychology hurdle. An auto- 
mobile is the second largest investment 
made by families who don't buy yachts 
and mink coats — and that includes 



case history 



nearly all of them. The family, of 
course, thinks hard about substantial 
things like price, performance, and 
specifications. But precisely because 
the new car investment is so large, 
some of the more subtle factors of psy- 
chology loom importantly. 

Briefly, this means that the family 
wants a car it can be proud of, a car 
that is regarded highly, a car its neigh- 
bors won't look down on. This ap- 
proach, admen feel, pays off in the 
long haul as well as the short. Willys- 
Overland, which engineered and manu- 
factured the never-to-be-forgotten jeep 
(and still is cashing in on it), will not 
have its pockets bulging with Govern- 
ment contracts indefinitely. Willys- 
Overland, in short, must accumulate 
good-will and a passenger car reputa- 
tion for the future. 

Some auto experts consider the very 
fact that Willys-Overland made its war 
and postwar reputation on jeeps and 
similar utility vehicles all the more 



iKUdLlIVI! To get consume) confidence in new, low-priced auto bULU I lUN" 



Known primarily as maker of famous jeep ami utility cars, Willys- 
Overland has to convince consumer it can make a good passenger car, 
too. ISeiv light Aero-Willys is aimed at most competitive auto field 





SVMPUflWY '<'"'•" »//v.s ddicrlisinf. 
i lYirnUNI QBS Radio's Philharmonic-Symphonj * 



30 



SPONSOR 



reason for its current air strategy. 
Families want a car to be more than 
an efficient mechanism. It must con- 
note style and artistry. What better 
way, therefore, than to suggest culture, 
leisure, luxury. 

The auto firm also is making a play 
for dealers with its programing. The 
importance of dealers in the auto busi- 
ness cannot be overestimated. I hey 
can make or break an automobile and 
not only are auto firms always scout- 
ing for aggressive, financially health) 
dealers but dealers themselves often 
keep an eye peeled for opportunities to 
latch on to a car with good sales possi- 
bilities, high marketability. 

Willys-Overland strategists kept this 
in mind when they made their decisions 
on air programing. And the firm re- 
ports that its prestige programing has 
been effective lure in attracting deal- 
ers. Apparentlv. hard-headed business- 
men go for the educated accents of 
Willy s-Overland's programing just as 
much as consumers do. 

Willj/s* program buys: Willys-Over- 
land whelped its new car early in 1952. 
It was a cautious delivery. There was 
no thunderous advertising explosion. 
A few sporadic radio spots were paid 
for bv dealers, but the broadcast fan- 
fare didn't start until the fall. For the 
'52-'53 broadcast season, Willys-Over- 
land plunked down $1,800,000 on radio 
and TV. Here are the choices made by 



IiIiikiii fiends Willys-Overland 

Ward Canaday, Willys president and 

chairman of board, was with company 

during World War I. left to go into 

advertising, then came back in 30s 

In pushing Willys' first passenger 

auto since pre- World War II days, 

Canaday is betting that a light 

economy car will appeal to consumer 

Canaday is active in many fields. He 
qualifies as housing expert, served 

Federal Government in this capacity. 
His home is in the Virgin Islands 




the firm and its agency, Ewell & Thur- 
ber Associates: 

1' The Aero-Willys bowed grace- 
fully to national air audiences on 19 
October with sponsorship of the New 
York Philharmonic-Symphony con- 
certs, a one-and-a-half hour Sunday 
afternoon program on CBS Radio. The 
concert series runs for 28 weeks on 
about 200 stations in the U.S. 

The Philharmonic - Symphony pur- 
chase caused some eyebrow lifting in 
broadcast circles. The orchestra had 
been without a sponsor since 1949, 
when Standard Oil of New Jersey un- 



dertook sponsorship for a season. Pre- 
viously, U. S. Rubber had paid for the 
concerts from 1943 to 1947. The or- 
chestra has been broadcasting since 
1930 but orchestra trustees rejected 
commercial sponsorship until the or- 
chestra became hard-pressed for funds. 
2. First sponsor to buy in, Willys- 
Overland also purchased CBS TV's 
great video experiment, Omnibus, 
another one-and-a-half hour Sunday r 
afternoon show. Apparently getting 
into the habit of gambling. Willys- 
Overland signed up for the Ford Foun- 
i I 'I case turn to page 77) 



• shows, the strategy being, to associate Aero-Willys with "finer" things in life, to arouse consumer pride in the car 




MNIBUS 



Willys bought CBS' TV experiment sight 
unseen. Its rating noiv tops its competitors 



INAUGURATION 



// illys joined GM and Packard in 
radio-TV coverage ol neivs events 



GARROWAY 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



To push its '53 models, Willys 
is now on NBC TV's Today 

31 




Typical new net business: Milner Products, a non-user 
of net radio, recently signed for new Pine-Sol show with Robert 



Q. Lewis and Chordettes (center and back row). Seated, left, is 
Milner's H. S. Cohoon, executive v.p.; at right, CBS's John Karol 



Is net radio staging a comeback? 

Network sales levels dropped 10% in '48-'51, but eased onlv 1% in '51-'52 



iwetuork radio's sales no-edive of 
1948-1951 is beginning to level off. In 
some cases — particularly CBS Radio 
and Mutual — the number of sold quar- 
ter-hours of network time is heading 
into a climb from the nadir of L951. 
This slowing-down of the drop in 
network sales is reflected in ihe charts 
on these pages. These figures show that 
there were 82 fewer sponsored quarter- 
hours in network radio in December 
1951, as compared with December 
1948, last big sales peak for the major 
webs. The drop between December 
1951 and the lasl month of 1952, how- 
ever, was only 10 sponsored quarter- 
hour slots. I'redictions are for a defi- 



32 



nite climb to near-1948 radio levels. 

The slump hasn't been licked yet, but 
the brakes are on. Sales officials of the 
radio webs show a confidence and lack 
of apologetic selling today. Network 
program impressarios are coming up 
with new. low-priced ideas, often delib- 
erately conceiving them as "something 
radio does better and cheaper than TV." 

Nighttime network radio, as these 
special sponsor charts show, has suf- 
fered much more than daytime radio. 
But even nighttime radio, thanks to a 
good deal of repricing and revamping, 
is healthier than it has been in several 
\ears. ABC Radio has held most of its 
1951 nighttime business and Mutual 



has made some nighttime gains. All 
networks are doing about as well, or 
better, in daytime radio today than 
they were five years ago. 

Financially, too, the situation is 
brighter. Last year, ABC Radio billed 
about $700,000 more in gross time 
charges than in 1951; Mutual billed 
about $3,000,000 more (although new 
discount structures lower both net in- 
creases). Similarly, NBC and CBS are 
now running at a level about 10-15'; 
higher than last year and are likely to 
continue the increase during 1953. 

Many a non-user or new client has 
recentlj bought network radio. O-Ce- 
dar Corp., successful user of spot TV, 

SPONSOR 



now also sponsors a portion of ABC 
Radio's Breakfast Club to get the full 
impact of daytime network radio in TV 
and non-TV homes. J. R. Wood, maker 
of Artcarved Rings, recently signed for 
a Sunday quarter-hour show on Mu- 
tual, after years of being a print-media 
user ( see story on network cut-ins. 
page 38 of this issue ) . 

CBS Radio points proudly to those 
sponsors — Kingan Meats. Milner Prod- 
ucts. I. J. Grass Noodle Co.. and others 
who are now clients of Columbia's ra- 
dio web and who were non-users of 
network radio in the past. NBC cites 
such major postwar advertisers as Rey- 
nolds Metals, a pioneer part-sponsor of 
NBC's Big Show, who recently signed 
for full sponsorship of the Tuesday - 
night Fibber McGee show. 

Many old familiar faces are back in 
network line-ups. too. Appliance-mak- 
ing Admiral Corp.. a big-lime TV pio- 
neer a few seasons ago and most re- 
cently a steady NBC TV advertiser 
with Lights Out. is back in the network 
radio fold, sponsoring a weekly 25- 
minute news show on CBS Radio. Lib- 
bv-McNeill & Libbv. and Johnson's 



status report 



Wax, famous names in network radio 
in the early 1940's who later dropped 
nut. are back with Nick Carter and 
news shows respectively on Mutual. 

On NBC, Miller Brewing— who had 
used network radio with little success 
in the past — is now back with the Tues- 
day-night First Nighter show. ABC 
Radio counts Gruen Watch Co., an- 
other big-time TV user in recent sea- 
sons, among its "revived" business, 
with Gruen sponsoring a radio-TV ver- 
sion of Walter Winehell. 

These are just a few of the new cli- 
ents in network radio, and a sampling 
of old clients who have been lured 
back. In the broad picture of network 
broadcasting, it is largely their adver- 
tising dollars which have helped pull 
radio networks out of the 1948-1951 
slump into a general recovery during 
1952 and the first month of 1953. 

What has caused this "rediscovery" 
of network radio, and the parallel i i — * - — 



in both billings and sponsored time? 

I "i one thing, the high < osts of I \ 
network broadcasting- — and the attrac- 
ts e time-and-talent prices of radio — 
have brought man\ a T\ -dazzled ad- 
vertiser to an abrupt halt, and made 
him take a long look at network radio. 

For another, the increased tempo of 
radio research — particular!) the cover- 
age studies of A. C. Nielsen and Dr. 
Ken Baker, the various studies of extra- 
set and out-of-home listening, and sales 
studies like NBC's "Radio Hofstra"- 
has tended to make radio, in close-up, 
look bigger and better. 

The major radio network-, watching 
their net earnings on gross radio bill- 
ings slide downward steadily after 
1948, have contributed to the rediscov- 
ei J . Radio webs, once the initial "buck 
fever" of television subsided, have 
come up with round after round of new 
price formulas, sales gimmicks, and 
added features. A few: 

J. Participation plans: Kadi of the 

major webs has a short-term plan for 

network advertisers, such as ABC Ra- 

i Please turn to page 80 1 



Such sponsors as these, new radio clients enter- 
ing, old ones returning, spark network upbeat 



abc 



Durkee Famous Foods 
Gruen Watch Co. 
Hotpoint, Inc. 
Lambert Pharmacal 
O-Cedar Corp. 
Seeman Bros. (ISylast) 



cbs 



Admiral Corp. 
American Bakers Assn. 
Cannon Mills 
I. ]. Grass Noodles 
Kingan & Co. 
Milner Products Co. 



I mbc 



Burlington Mills 
Deepfreeze Products 
Johnson"s Wax 
Libby, McNeill & Libby 
G. M. Pfaff Sewing Mach. 
J. R. Wood (Art. rings) 



I nbc 



American Chicle Co. 
Armour & Co. 
Hazel Bishop* Inc. 
Int'l Cellucotton. Kleenex 
Miller Brewing Co. 
Reynolds Metals 



IU lit-IUTtl slump in .void network tiuurter-hours 
was leveling hg end of f.V.12. mag stttrt upswing 





DAY 


NIGHT 


TOTAL 


Total sponsored quarter- 
hours* 4 net works, first 
week of December 1948 


535 


339 


S74 


Total sponsored quarter- 
hours, 4 networks, first 
iveek of December 1951 


529 


263 


792 


Total sponsored quarter- 
hours, 4 networks, first 
week of December 1952 


543 


239 


782 



Treiiils: As figures above show, the drop in total sponsored quarter-hours 
on the l<<ur major radio networks IB( . < BS, \fBS, and NBC -betweei 
the end of 1948 ami IT>I amounted to 82 time periods. However, the loss 
between the last months of 1951 and L952 was only 10 quarter hours. 
/)> all indications, the nine is leveling. Biggest losses hare been in night- 
time network radio, hardest-hit by TV. Biggest gains have been made in 
daytime network sales, where sponsored quarter-hours are now l..v, highei 
than 1948 daytime level. Most active networks, saleswise, are CBS and l//>'"> 
I BSs total level is nou 3.2% higher than in 1918: Mutual's is only 1.6 
liner. Stor\ starting at left explains hou repriced, revamped networks 
hare iron bach ail clients who deserted radio, meanwhile landing new ones. 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



33 



r 



■ 


' 







Hnr you can help ***> 

Jkmmhaiion h t 

W r 




<&f CH01VS * 

What if is 

The Purpose 
Time Table 

Kfepinq up inferesf 
The Finisher 










rUKINA btLLo lib LUNItbl! G. M.Philpott, company advertising boss, talks to radio executives 



iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii iitniiiiiiiiii iiimiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiuin 



What 100 merchandising consultant 

Feed firm, staging promotion contest among farm-radio stations, £ v 

demonstrated hon careful planning down 



J J om h ould \ nil go aboul hii ing 
]()U merchandising consultants in as 
many markets? 

Faced with this problem, the average 
adman might envision reams of corre- 
spondence, long-distance calls, and 
wild-goose chases by the dozen. But 
the Ralston Purina Co. in effect got the 
services of 100 local-level merchandis- 
ing specialists this past fall without a 
frantic scramble. The company staged 
a farm-radio station promotion contest 
which provided it with merchandising 

34 



ideas galore and plenty of lively sales- 
making promotion besides. 

The Ralston contest is a model wor- 
thy of study by any advertiser— agri- 
cultural or otherwise — who sells his 
product through a far-flung group of 
independent local dealers. It demon- 
strates how careful planning, aggres- 



erchandising 



sive contest promotion, plus the person- 
al touch can bring important results. 

The aggressive Purina admen and 
their agency, Brown Bros., St. Louis, 
not only laid out a complete promo- 
tion campaign for local-level radio ad- 
vertising but also went to a great deal 
of effort to sell it to the stations. They 
followed this up by riding herd on their 
radio outlets during the contest. They 
checked progress carefully, kept punch- 
ing with fresh jabs of enthusiasm and 
with additional radio purchases where 

SPONSOR 



i 



KLRA, which received prize for especially 
good tape recordings, "interviews" hog at 
mid-point of Purina dealer demonstration 



WKOW holds meeting with Purina dealers, 
sales at kick-off of campaign. Station 
man covered 3,000 miles taping interviews 



II \I(.T received special award for its Tl 
coverage. Treatment of a sick pig is ex- 
plained by Purina salesman Bob Trice, r. 




W'MT Farm Director Chuck Worcester re- 
cords weight gains of Purina-fed hog dur- 
ing a live demonstration at dealer's store 



KVOO had problem of supporting 23 dealers 
in campaign, discussed problem at a "get 
acquainted" dinner given by the station 



WLAC puts on remote from Purina dealer's 
store. During campaign station held a 3%- 
hour broadcast in store with own stars 



AIVIONG THE WINNERS! Prizes were free tickets, transportation to \eu Year's Da) football games 



IIMllllUllllllt llllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll' llllllllllllllllll llllli:il!l!ll[ll! lllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllll illlllltlllllllffi llllllllllilllllll llllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllt llllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll 



(I for hiriiiii 

*rchandisiiig ideas galore, 
al level brings sales payoff 



stations were especially live promoters. 

Purina's immediate purposes in run- 
ning the contest were these: 

!• To test and choose promotion 
and merchandising ideas. 

2. To encourage closer cooperation 
of radio stations, Purina salesmen, and 
Purina dealers. 

3. To show Purina dealers what 
radio could do for them with hep pro- 
motion, and to prove Purina is on the 
ball promotionwise. 

4. To point up to stations that Pu- 

9 FEBRUARY 1953 



rina had faith in radio (Purina is said 
to be the nation's No. 1 farm-radio ad- 
vertiser ) ; to make stations feel that a 
successful Purina promotion was grist 
for the station's own sales pitches to 
other advertisers; to get firm station 
support for Purina's sales efforts. 

S. To bring the attention of the 
farm audience to Purina feed products 
by blowing up its name via hard-hitting 



promotion and merchandising plans. 
Stations entering the Purina contest 
had to follow a simple promotion pat- 
tern laid down by the company. They 
were asked to run a series of livestock- 
growing contests in which an animal 
fed with a Ralston product was 
matched with one given other feed. 
The Ralston-fed animal wins every time 
but how the station varied the atten- 



pillllllllllllllllllll!ll!llllllllllllllllllllll!l 

How Purina got most out of farm-radio promotion contest 

► Firm worked out complete outlines of promotion contest beforehand, teas not 
content to merely ask stations for promotion help. During contest. Purina rode 
herd on stations, kept careful tabs on what they were doing to support campaign 

► Purina and agency. Brown Bros., sent out task force of executives to sell 
contest to stations. Group appeared at 11 regional meetings, pointed out that 
Purina icould spend more on farm radio in 19H2 than in all other media combined 

► Stations were advised by Purina on best promotion techniques, were urged 
to invite salesmen and dealers to meetings, to make recordings of interviews 

in dealers* stores. Purina bought additional time from stations doing good job 

g ► Campaign was built around two basic promotion gimmicks that had been tested 

for years by Purina. They tvere live demonstrations and were designed to show how 
pigs and hens flourished with Purina feeds, or "chows" as they are called on farms 



dant hoopla determined its standing in 
the competition. 

Nearl) 100 of 000 radio stations Pu- 
rina buys responded to its promotion 
bugle with presentations and 23 were 
named winner?. The winning stations 
along with local dealers who had 
worked with them received free tickets 
and transportation to New Year's Day 
football bowl games. (What each of 
the winners did is described in brief 
later in this report.) 

The company is making no secret of 
its feeling that the contest was a big 
success. It ran ads in trade papers to 
say so and to salute the winning sta- 
tions. Copy pointed out that radio had 
turned the promotion devices into 
"community projects known to every 
man. woman, and child. There were 
pig scrambles, parades, dances, enter- 
tainments, fund-raising devices, con- 
tests. . . . They built store traffic and 
increased sales and prestige for the 
Purina dealers. They put the radio sta- 
tions in the community spotlight, too." 

The contest bore the smooth, unmis- 
takable imprint of a professional hand. 



This was due partly to Purina"s long 
experience in radio and its ranking as 
a top farm-radio advertiser. But there 
were three factors in particular that 
had a lot to do with the final form of 
the contest. They were ( 1 ) the use of 
two well-tested promotional gimmicks, 
I 2 I the fact that Purina could pick the 
brains of those stations which stood out 
in a previous 1951 promotion contest, 
and (3) a small-scale promotion effort 
in the South, also held in 1951, which 
stressed station-dealer-salesman coop- 
eration on the local level. 

This experimental Southern cam- 
paign convinced the Purina-Brown 
strategy staff that more intensive local- 
level cooperation would pay off ex- 
ceedingly well. As a result the '52 con- 
test went far beyond the '51 contest in 
that respect. ( For the story of the 
1951 contest, see "How Purina profit- 
ed by farm station contest," sponsor, 
25 February 1952.) 

Here are some details on the three 
factors mentioned above: 

1' The two promotional gimmicks 
had been used in a number of Purina 



fall campaigns. They are known as 
"Mike and Ike" and "Lay and Pay" 
demonstrations. Here's how the "Mike 
and Ike" promotion works: The dealer 
gets a pair of young pigs from the same 
litter which weigh about the same. 
They are put in stalls in or right out- 
side the store. "Mike" is fed Purina 
Chows and "Ike" is given a straight 
grain diet. The 'dealer keeps track of 
the weights of both animals and posts 
them. "Mike," of course, gains fast- 
er. The specific purpose is to show 
farmers how grain can be saved by 
feeding a good supplement and how 
fast hogs can be readied for the mar- 
ket on a Purina diet. 

The "Lay and Pay" demonstration 
usually involves five or six hens kept 
in cages in the store. They are all fed 
Purina Layena and the dealer keeps 
daily records of the egg production of 
each hen. Results show how well hens 
lay and pay with good feed and prop- 
er management. 

Both ideas are based on the sound 
advertising maxim that a buyer is more 
(Please turn to page 74) 



Purina shows stations faith In ratllv: Maury Malin, top 
right, Purina's Choiv Department ad tnanager. holds up, at Chicago 
regional meeting jor station executives, dummy check dramatizing 



fact that Purina was spending $1,450,000 on farm radio in 1952 
compared with $1,290,000 on all other media. This meeting was 
one of 11 in which the company sold promotion contest to stations 







feutai 



, ;■ 







These are 10 points to ehei'k before adding u market to your 
TV line-up. uvvording to inung lending titnebugers 

► Are there enough families in the area covered by the station whose potential purchase of the 
product will be large enough to justify the future cost of that market? 



Is the market already adequately covered by outside TV stations? 



What is the opening rate in regard to the market's sales potential? Overpriced? Or can 
you wait until the potential becomes more distinct? 



What other accounts are going into that market? 



Make sure to estimate what the rate will be in a year or two so that you are fairly confident 
that you are establishing a worthwhile franchise for your client. 



Make sure the percentage of TV penetration is high enough to make the market a good buy; 
that is, there will be an ample number of family sets. 



Will the product's ultimate budget be sufficient to keep the market on the list, or is it the t\pe <>i 
market you will be inclined to drop so as to be able to meet rate increases in other markets? 



Even though the market is adequately covered by an outside station, will the addition of a local 
station in that market help the client's dealer relations to justify the additional payment? 



How important is the market to your client's product, in the event his major competition 
is already on a local station? Is the station rate out of line with the sales potential? 



If the market is being well covered by an outside station but at an unsatisfactory time, does 
the availability of a preferable spot on the local station in that market justify its addition? 

NOTE: The above is a distillation of the check points offered by timebuyers in 12 
important New York ad agencies as the result of an inquiry conducted by SPONSOR. 



TV puzzler: what new markets to buy 

SPONSOR poll discloses admen less disposed to adding new markets; 
groping for formula that can be applied to coverage problems 



j^ tations in some of the newly opened 
and upcoming TV markets are discov- 
ering that national advertisers may not 
provide them with the sort of Klondike 
rush they had anticipated. 

These stations are finding, much to 
their dismay, that a freeze of sorts has 
set in on time buying. Advertisers and 
agencies — especially the big ones — for 
the first time since the lifting of the 
freeze are taking long looks at the new- 
er secondary and tertiary markets. An- 
other disquieting factor is the move- 
ment among several top agencies to 
reduce the business of selecting TV 

9 FEBRUARY 1953 



markets to a formula, or slide-rule 
basis. 

sponsor has conducted an inquirj 
on these two trends by addressing the 
following two questions to ad man- 
agers, media directors, research direc- 
tors, timebuyers, network station rela- 
tion officials, and station reps: 

I. To what do you attribute the 
marked slowdown in the adding of new 



controversy 



markets to hookups ol sponsored net- 
work programs? 

'*• Is it practical at the present 
stage of TV's development to deter- 
mine the importance or value of a sec- 
ondary market according to a specific 
set of rules.' 

The survey, in summary, disclosed 
that budget exhaustion was an impor- 
tant factor in the buying slowdown 
and that there exists among admen 
some disparity of opinion as to wheth- 
er TV at this point Lends itself to a 
regimented buying pattern. 

I Please turn to page !!.'•> i 



37 



What a sponsor 
should know 
about network cut-ins 



§@me two dozen network eSients today spend 
Q l.OOO.O^O annuaEly for Eoeal, regional inserts 



M he map tit right illustrates a dra- 
matic fact: General Mills airs a single 
network radio show, ABC Radio's Bill 
Ring, to sell simultaneously at least five 
different GM products in as many re- 
gions of the U. S. Moreover, some of 
these brands are sold in distribution 
"islands" deep inside another GM 
brand's territory, and periodic rota- 
tions are made between entire regional 
brand promotions. 

General Mills' secret: regional and 
local cut-ins made during the commer- 
cial portions of Bill Ring. No less than 
27 cut-ins were involved during the 
typical mid-1952 week mapped here. 
Total cost, in addition to the usual 
time-and-talent charges varies between 
$350 and $600 per week. And GM op- 
erates similarly with many other radio 
and TV net shows it sponsors. 

Such cut-ins on network shows — not 
counting the healthy annual business 
in network "co-op" programs — are big 
business today. As sponsor went to 
press, more than two dozen leading ad- 
vertisers were using large-scale region- 
al or local cut-ins in conjunction with 
their network radio and TV shows. 
Currently, these advertisers are spend- 
ing money at a total annual rate of 
nearly $1,000,000 for radio and TV 
cut-in charges. 

With "national" air planning giving 
way more and more to "market-by- 



commercials 



market" planning, the total number of 
cut-in users at the network level-— and 
the total amount of money they will 
shell out in service costs — will prob- 
ably be anywhere from 20% to 50% 
higher by next year, network officials 
and sales executives predict. 

From the network point of view, the 
growing use of cut-ins along with net- 
work shows is another step forward in 
achieving increased flexibility. In the 
eyes of station reps, who feel that big 
cut-in operations like General Mills' 
Bill Ring are poaching on spot broad- 
casting, cut-ins seem to be an attempt 
by networks to do something which 
spot radio-TV does better. 

Cut-ins are employed by many ma- 
jor-league advertisers. Current and 
near-future users of network cut-ins, 
radio and TV, include: P&G, General 
Mills, Philco, General Foods, Bristol- 
Myers, Johns-Manville, Quaker Oats, 
State Farm Insurance, Continental Bak- 
ing, Cannon Mills, Manhattan Soap, 
Carter Products, Club Aluminum, and 
Gillette Safety Razor. 

What's behind the increased use of 
network cut-ins, often in operations as 
large and as flexible as that typified by 
General Mills' Bill Ring? Are cut-ins 
useful? Do they work better for some 
advertisers than for others? Are they 
worth the trouble? Such questions are 
often being asked today by advertisers 
and agencies who have kept close tabs 
on the rapidly shifting trends of net- 
work broadcasting. 

SPONSOR herewith presents a round- 
up ol information on the subject of 




Symbols represent GM's cut-in brand 
* Red Star T& Rex 



▼ Purasnotc 
O White Deer 



O Local cut-in 
done in oil n 
brand area\ { 



38 



network cut-ins. Later in this report, 
new data on cut-in costs, policies, and 
cut-in problems will be discussed. The 
majority of the data were gathered by 
sponsor from interviews with network 
sales and operations officials, and by 
talks with several leading agencies who 
have cut-in-using clients. 

Advertisers now using cut-ins fall 
roughly into two main categories. 
First, there are the advertisers who un- 
hook one or more stations from their 
network radio or TV show in order to 
insert a local or regional commercial 
for another of their products. Sec- 
ondly, another large group of advertis- 
ers blanket the nation with dealer and 
distributor cut-ins, unhooking every 
market on their network in order to 

SPONSOR 



at General Mills makes one net show do work of five with aid of cut-ins 




artous 

terry Brands 

i rotating cut-in 
(Musis. Usually fed re- 
tonally from Hollywood 



Explanation: Map above shows complex 
cut-in operation done on General Mills' Bill 
Ring show, Monday -Friday, 12:30 to 12:15 p.m. 
Stations airing show are mapped; the others aren't 
shoivn. Cut-in system shown, used during mid-\952, 
enabled GM to: (1) duck around major TV areas in 
East and Midwest, (2) air regional plugs for GM brands 



insert 30-second (or less) local name 
plugs for their retailers. 

Here are five examples of such cut- 
in usage, from both categories. They 
include: a soap manufacturer, a build- 
ing materials firm, a baby food spon- 
sor, a textile house, and a jewelry con- 
cern that makes diamond rings. 

Procter & Gamble: P&G is prob- 
ably the biggest buyer of cut-ins. P&G 
shows, particularly daytime serials on 
NBC and CBS Radio, are often only 
the framework for a series of local and 
regional airselling jobs. These shows 
are aired, of course, across the coun- 
try under P&G's banner. But commer- 
cials often appear in a patchwork-quilt 
(Please turn to page 70) 



piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 



Four tips on using network radio-TV cut-ins 

/Xpplications: Cut-ins on network shows, locally and regionally, have two 
basic uses for clients. (1) Cut-ins can "insert" a second air commercial in a 
local market or major region. (2) Dealer names can be tied to network plugs 

Service costs: Station and/or network cut-in service charges are based 
on use of extra facilities, such as switching and extra lines, and must be esti- 
mated for each operation. They are small (5-10%) part of total show cost 

Talent costs: Since cut-ins are usually done from transcriptions (radio) 
and films [TV), special commercials may be needed. Costs are similar to spot 
commercials. Also, local radio-TV announcers may get $2-30, if scales apply 

l%et policies: Mutual and ABC are generally more receptive to radio cut- 
in. deals than are NBC and CBS. In TV, ABC and Du Mont are most likely to 
permit their use on large scale. Policies change; checking nets is a must 



^liniiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH^ 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



39 




INTERWOVEN INTO RECIPE CHATTER ON "ELECTRIC LIVING" SHOW ARE DEMONSTRATIONS OF MANY APPLIANCES. PICTURES AT RIGHT SHO 



Can you use Boston Edison's low-cost formula? 



Utility employees double on TV 

For under 81.000 a week, firm airs home* economics show that sol 




J.WM '<*"} a local advertiser with a 
$60,000 T\ budget in a L,000,000-set 
market finds himself either splurging 
on a seasonal promotion or settling for 
a regular campaign of LO-second an- 
rioum emcnls. But neither of these 
courses appealed to the Boston Edison 
Co. and ils advertising agency. John 
C. Dowd, Inc. 

How this compaii) developed an in- 
teresting, audience-attracting, 52- week- 
a-year program at a total cost ol $1,000 
;i wick might well be a model for other 
advertisers who have one eye on T\ 

and the other on costs. 

Man) utility firms loda\ concentrate 
on "public service" programing. Bos 
ion Edison's "Electric Living" pro- 
gram on \\ BZ-TV ever) Tuesday after- 



40 



noon interlards recipes I using electric 
mixers, refrigerators, ranges, etc. ) 
with commercials which swing from 
the friendl) services supplied by the 
company's 3.500 employees to the ben- 
efits, convenience, and advantages of 
electric living. No specific manufac- 
turer's line of appliances is plugged, 
hul stress is often laid on a particular 
item such as an electric roaster. 

Secret of the program s low cost is 
the fact that ever) performer on the 
show is a regular full-time Edison corn- 
pan) employee whose TV activities are 



case history 



secondary to his other duties. Respon- 
sible for this unusual concept are Bos- 
ton Edison's public relations \ .1*. 
Thomas H. Carens and TV Director 
Robert Cunningham working with 
^gencymen J. Norman McKenzie. ac- 
< ounl exec, and Radio-TV Director 
Ted Pitman. 

Contributing to the problem is the 
fact that the goal of most utilities is a 
twofold one: 111 creating and main- 
Luning good public relations, and I 2 I 
load-building via increased sale and 
use of appliances. But both of these 
objectives must be pursued subtb . Bos- 
ton Edison officials discovered that 
when thc\ put radio station WEEI 
(for Edison ElecJrical Illuminating Co.. 
but since purchased b) CBS) on the 

SPONSOR 




j (; iT ON TV AND AT REGULAR BOSTON EDISON JOBS 



uare costs 



ippliances and wins good will 



air in 1924 and announced that the en- 
tertainment furnished "will engender a 
friendly feeling toward our company." 
The Massachusetts Department of Pub- 
lic Utilities promptly received a letter 
from one skeptic charging that "Radio 
Station WEEI is a bald-faced ruse to 
make people stay up late — and burn 
more electric lights!" 

The thousands of warm letters re- 
ceived by the firm since the TV pro- 
gram started are evidence that today's 
good will efforts are better received by 
the public. 

Now in its 70th week on the air, 
"Electric Living" reaches TV families 
at an annual cost of $.0715 per fam- 
ily, according to September 1952 es- 
timates. 



• * • 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



On iht* air und off thv jj<n 

EUCTRIFr 

YOUR 




Bill Syran mis as m.c. oj "Electric Liv- 
ing" program, also delit ers commercials 
lor the electric appliances being featured 



I s a district manager, Bill funis his pub 
lie relations work easiei because oj cus 

turners' familiarity uith him through TV 




Tricks such as broiling a turkey arc dem- 
onstrate/I l.\ Marion Taylor, whose warm 
approach draws man) fan letters week!) 



"l«0UMTi., ■ "-"WIS 

//( the Boston Edison home service kitch- 
en Motion liaises and distributes rnanv 
oj the recipes which have icon her fame 




Kay Lynch, another home economist, 
makes appetizing salads and mouth-water- 
ing desserts seem simple using appliances 



Purchasers of new electric ranges are 
often surprised when Kay turns up at 
their home to gire demonstrations, hints 




Boston Edisoris answer to Betty Eurness 
is Hazel White, whose friendly sales pat- 
ter has hypoed sales of elei trie appliant es 



Complaining customers are easily molli- 
fied by a home visit Irom Hazel who 
often sidles many kitchen problems 







J^ 



\ i 







ft. 




1 




* 


r J ^ m 




bfcll 


















.*t<^ 




^— 















II 

Bo.y Score 

Total no. of U.S. stations on 
air, incl. Honolulu (as of 28 
Jan.) '37 

No. of markets covered _ "5 

No. of new-station applications 

pending (approx.) — 780 

No. of CP's granted .. 20» 

No. of grantees not yet on air 180 

No. of TV homes in U.S. .21,234,100 

Per cent of all U.S. homes with 

TV sets 44.8% 

Per cent of all homes in TV 

coverage areas 0I.;»% 



"3 



Scenes like this one — construction of RCA Su- 
pcrstile antenna — can be seen all over USjt. 



Key facts o 

SPONSOR'S special list 



a^ponsor, starting with this issue, 
will regularly publish a chart listing 
newly opened and upcoming stations. 
The type of information given in the 
instance of each station reflects a poll 
made by sponsor among advertisers 
and agency people to find out what sort 
of material would be most useful to 
them in the matter of selecting mar- 
kets, media planning, etc. 

The charts carried on the adjoining 
and subsequent pages list the 209 CP's 
granted to television stations since the 
lifting of the freeze in April 1952. 
However, the listing as a regular fea- 
ture will be limited to stations which 
have received their CP's but are not 
vet on the air along with stations which 
have but recently started operating. 

Of the 209 post-freeze authorizations, 
29 stations are on the air; added to the 
108 pre-freeze stations the number of 
stations actively telecasting, as of spon- 
sor's going to press, came to 137. 

The number of stations affiliated 
with networks totals 118. which repre- 
sents 74 markets, according to the 
A T & T's Long Lines Department. 

^On 28 January eight more commer- 
cial grants were made: Fort Dodge. la. 
iCh 21): Memphis. Tenn. (Ch 13): 
Johnson City. Tenn. I Ch 11) : Roswell. 
N. M. (Ch 8) : Salem. Ore. (Ch 24) : 
Tyler, Tex. (Ch 19) : Temple, Tex. (Ch 
6): Charlottesville. Va. (Ch 64). De- 
tailed listings on these stations will ap- 
pear in a subsequent issue of sponsor. 




new and upcoming TV stations 



ii l. -i ins every station licensed since lifting of freeze 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

New and upcoming TV stations 

(CP's granted since lifting of freeze on 14 April 7952 through 28 January 1953) 



City and state 



labama 



Market 
rank 



Call letters 
& channel 



Power (kw) 



Visual 



Aurai 



Net affil. 



No. TV 
stns on 
air now 



No. sets In 
mkt now" 



Licensee-owner 



Manager 



Sales rep 



lirmingham 


27 


WJLN-TV(48) 


nk 


230 


120 


2 


141,000 


Johnston Bdcstg. Co. 






WSGN-TV(42) 


nk 


1,000 


500 






Birmingham News Co. Henry P. John- Blair-TV 
ston 


ladsden 


164 


WTVS(2I) 


April '53 


22 


II 







Jacob A. Newborn Jr. 


Mobile 


85 


WALA-TV(IO) 


14 Jan. '53* 


316 


235 


NBC. ABC 2 


17,000 


Pape Bdcstg. Co. Howard Martin Headley-Reed 






WKAB-TV(48) 


29 Dec. '52 


22.5 


12 


DuM.CBS 




Pursley Bdcstg. Serv. Forjoe 


Montgomery 


127 


WCOV-TV(20) 


Mar. '53 


88 


44 


CBS 


4,000 


Capital Bdcstg. Co. Hugh M. Smith Taylor 
(WCOV) 


Arizona 


















Fucson 


124 


KCNA-TV( 9) 


nk 


25 


12.5 







Catalina Bdcstg. Co. 






KOPO-TV(l3) 


1 Feb. 53 


316 


160 






Old Pueblo Bdcstg. Co. 






KVOA-TV( 4) 


Mar. '53 


II 


5.5 


NBC 




Arizona Bdcstg. Co. R. B. Williams Raymer 
(KVOA) 


Arkansas 


















Port Smith 


184 


KFSA-TV(22) 


May '53 


265 


145 





1,500 


Southwestern Publ. Co. Weldon Stamps Pearson 
(KFSA) 


Little Rock 


96 


KETV(23) 


nk 


17.5 


9.9 





2,200 


Great Plains TV Properties 






KRTV(I7) 


15 Apr. '53 


22 


12.5 






Little Rock Telecasters Pearson 


California 


















Bakersfield 




KAFY-TV(29) 


Apr. '53 


20.5 


II 


All four 




Bakersfleld Bdcstg. Co Forjoe 


Fresno 


71 


KMJ-TV(24) 


May '53 


105 


53 







McClatchy Bdcstg. Co. Raymer 


Los Angeles 


3 


KPIK(22) 


Sep. "S3 


540 


320 


/ 


1,275,000 


John Poole Bdcstg. Co. 






KUSC-TV(28) 


nk 


46 


26 






Univ. of Southern Cal. 


San Bernar- 
dino 


68 


KITO-TV(l8) 


Fall '53 


87 


49 





51,188 


KITO. Inc. Hollingbery 


hk Not known 


















i" Most prospective startir 


lg dates h 


ive been obtained 


from the actual grantees, others 


from trade 


sources. Many must be deemed only 


approximations. 


** The number of TV sets 


designated 


in each market are 


necessarily approximate. In most 


cities with 


stations already on 


the air. NBC TV 


Research figures are used ; all others are estimates from various sources. 


t Rankings so marked inc 
jso designated and the mar 
lAshland: Holyoke, Mass.: 


irate that the city itself is actually only part of a market which has this rank (markets are 
<et city-group are here listed: New Britain, Conn.: Hartford-New Britain; Waterbury, Conn.: 
Springfield-Holyoke; New Bedford. Mass.: Fall River -New Bedford; Bethlehem & Kaston. Pa. 


iassilU'd according to Metropolitan Area population as defined by Sales Management). Citl< 
New Haven-Waterbury: St. Petersburg. Fla. : Tampa-St. Petersburg; Ashland. Ky : Huntlngtor 
AlentovmBcthlehem Easton; Hazleton, Pa.: Wilkes -liarre-Hazloton. 


Blank scaces indicate infc 


rmation unavailable at press 


time. 












9 FEB 


RUARY 


1953 












43 





















































City and state 


Market 
rank 


Call letters 
& channel 




On-air date* 


Powe 


r (kw) 


Net affil. 


No. TV 
stns on 
air now 


No. sets in 
mkt now' 


Licensee-owner 


Manager 




Sales rep 
















Visual 


Aural 
















lanta Barbara 




KEY-T( 3) 


May '53 


50 


25 


All four 


40,000 


Santa Barbara Bclcstg. & 
TV Corp. 


Colin M. Selph 


Hollingbery !»' 






















Ml 


ialinas 




nk(28) 


nk 


105 


60 







Salinas- Monterey TV Co. 






itockton 


91 


KTVU(36) 


nk 


145 


78 







San Joaquin Telecasters 




li< 






















■1 


Colorado 






















olo. Springs 


179 


KKTV(II) 


7 Dec. '52 


250 


125 


ABC, CBS, 1 
DuM 


25,000 


TV Colorado. Inc. (KVOP 
KGHF) 


James D. Russell 


Hollingbery ^ 


1 




KRDO-TV(l3) 


Apr. '53 


240 


120 






Pikes Peak Bdcstg. Co. 
(KRDO) 


Joe Rohrer 


McGillvra 

j If 


►ciirer 


26 


KBTV( 9) 


2 Oct. '52 


240 


120 


CBS, ABC 2 


85,000 


Colorado TV Corp. 


Joseph Herold 


Free & Peters 






KFEL-TV( 2) 


II Jul. '52 


56 


28.5 


NBC, DuM 




Eugene P. O'Fallon 
(KFEL) 


Gene O'Fallon 


Blair-TV 


| 




KDEN(26) 


Spring '53 


1 10 


55 






Empire Coil Co. 




ll 


1 




KIRV(20) 


Sep. '53 


89 


53 






Mountain States TV Co. 






i 
F'tieblo 


167 


KCSJ-TV( 5) 


Mar. '53 


12 


6 





4,000 


Star Bdcstg. Co. (KCSJ 


Douglas D. 
Kahle 


Avery- Knodel . 


■ 




KDZA-TV( 3) 


Feb. '53 


10.5 5.3 






Pueblo Radio Co. (KDZA) Dee B. Crouch 


McGillvra 
























kOnnecticut 






















*'ridgeport 


35 


WICC-TV(43) 


Feb. '53 


180 


91 


ABC 


5,055 


Southern Conn. & L. 1. TV Philip Merryman 
Co. (WICC) 


Young 






WSJL(49) 


nk 


99 


60 






Harry L. Liftig 






fir Britain 


32 1 


WKNB-TV(30) 


8 Feb. '53 


205 


105 


CBS 


300,000 


New Britain Bdcstg. Co. 
(WKNB) 


Peter B. Kenney 


Boiling [ 


etv London 




WNLC-TV(26) 


Auq. '53 


105 


54 





25,000 


Thames Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WNLC) 


Gerald J. Morey 




Vaterburg 


301 


WATR-TV(53) 


Mar. '53 


245 


125 





345,000 
Waterbury- 


WATR. Inc. 


Samuel R. Elman 


Rambeau 




















New Haven 























New Haven 






lorida 

t. Latulerdale 


WFTL-TV(23) 
WITV(I7) 


Mar. '53 

nk 


too 

18.5 


56 
1 1 


1 



50,000 


Gore Publ. Co. (Ft. Lau- 
derdale Daily News) 

Gcrco Investment Co. 
(WBRD) 


J. W. Dickey Weed 


aheland 


WONN-TV(l6) 


nk 


85 


43 







WONN-TV, Inc. 




ensaeola 


143 WAFA-TV(I5) 


June '53 


20 


10 





1,000 


Southland Telecasters 


C. W. Lamar Jr. Young 


t. Petersburg 


45t WSUN-TV(38) 


May '53 


83 


42 





8,000 


City of St. Petersburg 


George D. Rob- Weed & Co 
inson 


'. Palm Beach 


141 WIRK-TV(2I) 


June '53 


22 


11.5 





3,500 


WIRK-TV. Inc. 
(WIRK) 


J. S. Field 


aho 

oise 

1 


KIDO-TV( 7) 

nk( 9) 


June '53 
nk 


51 
32 


26 
16 







KIDO. Inc. 

Idaho Bdcstg. & TV Co. 


Blair TV 


44 
















SPONSOR 



City and state 



linois 

telleville 



7ii «•««»«» 



tani'ille 



tevatur 



Market 
rank 



Call letters 
& channel 



Power (kw) 



No. TV 
stns on 
air now 



No. sets in 

mkt now" 



Licensee-owner 



Manager 



Sales rep 



WTVI(54) May '53 220 120 CBS 



Signal Hill Telecasting 
Corp. 



Young 



2 WHFC-TV(26) nk 



217.45 I08.7E 



4 1,360.000 WHFC. Inc. 



WDAN-TV(24) nk 



19 9.5 



2 000 Northwestern Publ. Co. Robert J. Burow Everett-McKlnney 

(WOAN) 



154 WTVP(I7) July '53 



18 9.8 



15,000 Prairie TV Co. 



Harold G. Cow- 
gill 



•eorio 



78 WEEK-TV(43) I Feb. '53 175 88 



NBC, CBS, 
DuM 



WTVH-TV(I9) 15 May '53 95 54 ABC, CBS, 

DuM 



16 000 West Central Bdcstg. Co. 

(KRMG) 



Hilltop Bdcstg. Co. 
(KSTT) 



Fred C. Mueller Htadley-Reed 



Hugh R. Normar Sears & Ayer 



loekford 



ndiana 

Lafayette 



■ffuncie 



116 WTVO(39) Apr. '53 15.5 8.5 NBC 



20,000 Winnebago TV Corp. Harold Froellch Weed TV 



WFAM-TV(59) May '53 



20 10.5 



30,000 



WFAM. Inc. (WASK. 
WFAM-TV) 



O. E. Richard- Rambiau 

son 



166 WLBC-TV(49) 8 Mar '53 



16 8.1 



18,393 



Tri-C ty Radio Corp. 
(WLBC) 



Houth Bend 



Iowa 

Sioux City 



90 WSBT-TV(34) 21 Dec. '52 



170 



88 CBS, NBC I 

DuM 



35,000 



Scuth Bend Tribune 
(WSBT) 



R. H. Swlnt* Raymer 



153 KWTV(36) nk 

KVTV( 9) Apr. '53 



18.5 10.5 
29 15.5 



20 095 Great Plains TV Properties 



CBS 



Cowles Bdcstg. Co. 
(WNAX. KRNT) 



Bob Tlncher KaU 



Kansas 

i 

Manhattan 



Hutchinson 



Kentucky 

Ashland 



Henderson 



Louisville 



Louisiana 

"Baton Rouge 



KSAC-TV( 8) nk 



52 26 



Kans. State Coll. of Agric 



ok ( 12) nk 



117 59 



Hutchinson TV. Inc. 



Blf WPTV(59) May '53 250 130 



80 000 Polan Industries 



Lake Charles 



WEHT(50) May '53 



26 13 



Ohio Valley TV Co. 



25 WKLO-TV(2l) July '53 

nk|4l) nk 



200 100 ABC 
240 125 



178 000 Mid-America Bdcstg. Corp. Joe Eaton 

Robert W. Rounsaville 



Blair. TV 



113 KHTV(40) Fall '53 

WAFB-TV(28) Feb. '53 



290 150 

225 115 All four 



5,800 



Capital TV & Bdcstg. Co. 

Modern Bdcstg. Co. Tom E. Gibbens Adam Young 



KTAG-TV(25) June '53 20 10.5 



500 



Southland Telecasters 



C. W. Lamar Jr. Adam Young 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



45 





























City and state 


Market 
rank 


Call letters 
& channel 


On-air date* 


Power (kw) 


Net affll. 


No. TV 
stns on 
air now 


No. sets in 
mkt now*" 


Licensee-owner 


Manager 


Sales rep 


1 


Visual 


Aural 


lonroe 


180 KFAZ(43 
KNOE-TV( 8 


June '53 
Apr. '53 


77 44 
170 88 








Delta TV. Inc. 

James A. Noe (KNOE) 


Howard E. Grif- 
fith 

Paul H. Goldmar 


H-R Reps 


I'll 

On 


dine 

angor 


WABI-TV( 5 


31 Jan. '53 


1.9 95 


All four 


10,000 


Community Telecasting 
Serv. (WABI) 


Murray Carpentei 


Holllngbery: 
Carter 


It 

Kette ; 

si. 


aryland 

altimore 


12 WITH-TV(60] 


6 mos. to yr. 


105 59 


3 


453,000 


WITH-TV. Inc. (WITH) 


Thomas G. Tins 
ley Jr. 




« 
It 


rederick 


WFMD-TV(62) 


Late '53 


105 54 





15,000 


Monocacy Bdcstg. Ca. 
(WFMD) 


Allan W. Long 




ll( 


Massachusetts 

•nil River 


49 WSEE-TV(46) 


May '53 


19.5 9.8 





80,483 


New England TV Co. 






1 

b 


i 
folyoke 


42 1 WHYN-TV(55) 


Mar. '53 


65 35 


CBS, DuM 


55,000 


Hampden-Hampshire Corp. 
(WHYN) 


Charles N. De- 
Rose 


Branham 


Fi 


\rn Bedford 
1 


49t WNBH-TV(28) 


Early '53 


200 100 





(See Fall 
River) 


E. Anthony & Sons 
(WNBH) 




Walker 


i 


1 
orthampton 


nk(36) 


nlc 


21.4 12.8 







Regional TV Corp 
(WACE) 






1 

i j 


tringfield 


42 WWLP(6I) 


1 Mar. '53 


150 75 


ABC, NBC 


76,698 


Springfield TV Bdcstg. 
Corp. (WSPR) 


Alan C. Tlndal 


Holllngbery; 


Bannan 


ichigan 

nn Arbor 


WPAG-TV(20) 


Mar. "53 


1.75 .93 DuM 


14.000 


Washtenaw Bdcstg. Co. 
(WPAG) 


Edward F. 
Baughn 


McGillvra 




utile Creek 


138 WBCK-TV(58) 
WBKZ-TV(64) 


Summer '53 
May '53 


18.5 9.3 
24.5 14 



ABC, DuM 




Michigan Bdcstg. Co. 
(WBCK) 

Booth Radio & TV Stns. 
Inc. 






i 


ist Lansing 


WKAR-TV(60) 


Sep. '53 


245 125 







Mich. St. Bd. of Agric. 
Mich. St. College 
(WKAR) 


Dr. Armand L. 
Hunter 






int 


73 WCTV(28) 
WTAC-TV(I6) 


Latespring'53 17.5 8.7 
nlc 59 29.5 





44,719 


Trans-American TV Corp. 

Tr, mill -Campbell Bdcstg. 
Corp. (WTAC) 


James L. Ruben 
stone 






ickson 


146 WIBM-TV(48) 


Summer '53 


225 115 





14,736 


WIBM. Inc. (WIBM) 








uiamazoo 


135 WKMI-TV(36) 


Oct. '53 


83 47 


1 


169,000 


Steere Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WKMI) 


Emll J. Popke 
Jr. 


H Ft Reps 




uskegon 


137 WTVM(35) 


Sep. '53 


270 140 







Vcrsluls Radio & TV. Inc 








i 
ginawc 


115 WKNX-TV(57) 


Mar. '53 


19 10 





21,000 


Lake Huron Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WKNX) 


William J. Ed- 
wards 


Glll-Keefe & 


Perna 



46 



SPONSOR 



City and state 



Market 
rank 



Call letters 
& channel 



Power (kw) 



No. TV 

stns on 
air now 



No. sets In 
mkt now'' 



Licensee-owner 



Sales rep 



Minnesota 
>iifuffi 



Rochester 



it. Cloud 



Mississippi 

faekson 



Meridian 



Missouri 



Columbia 



Festus 



Kansas Citu 



St. Joseph 



77 WFTV(38) Mar. '53 



17 9.6 



I 703 Great Plains TV Propertlei James C. Cole 



nk(lO) nk 



105 54 



Southern Minn. Bdcstg. Co 



nk( 7) nlc 



23.5 12 



Granite City Bdcstg Co. 
(WJON) 



125 WJTV(25) 20 Jan. '53 160 98 



NBC, ABC, 
CBS, DuM 



2 000 Mississippi Publishers Corp 



Katz 



WCOC-TV(30) nk 



210 110 CBS 



Mississippi Bdcstg. Co. 
(WCOC) 



nk( 8) nk 



205 105 



Curator of U of Mo. 



KACY(I4) July '53 



170 89 



Ozark TV Corp. 



1 

h_ 



17 nk(25) nk 

: 



93 51 



253,000 



Empire Coil Co. (WXEL. 
KPTV) 



165 KFEQ-TV( 2) May '53 



52 26 CBS I 237,108 KFEQ ' '" 



Barton Pitts Headley-Reed 



St. Louis 



nk(36) nk 
nk(42) nk 



275 145 

81.7 46.2 



I 468 000 Broadcast Housn. Inc. 

Mitsourl Bdcstg. Corp 



Springfield 



148 KTTS-TV(IO) Mar. '53 12.5 6.4 

nk( 3) July '53 60.4 30.2 



1,000 



Independent Bdcstg. Co. 
(KTTS) 



Springfield TV. Inc. 



Pearson Ward Weed 



J. Gordon War- 
dell 



Montana 

Billings 



Butte 



nk( 8) nk 



12 6.2 



Rudman-Hayutln TV Co. 



nk( 4) nk 



14.5 7.3 



Copper Bdcstg. Co. 



Great Falls 



Nebraska 

Lincoln 



nk( 5) nk 



8.9 4.5 



Buttrey Bdcstg. Inc. 



139 KFOR-TV(IO) May '53 
KOLN-TV(l2) Feb. "53 



59 29.5 ABC 

21.5 II DuM 



28,000 



Cornbelt Bdcstg. Corp. 
(KFOR) 



Cornhusker Radio & TV 
Corp. (KOLN) 



George Smith Petry 



Harold E. An- Weed 

derson 



Nevada 

Reno 






KZTV( 8) Mar. '53 



3 1.5 



Nevada Radio-TV Corp. 
(KWRN) 



New Jersey 

Asburu Parh 



WCEE(58) Late '53 



100 50 



Atlantic Video Corp. 



Harold C. Burke 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



47 




HBP 



"FAVORITE STORY" WILL BE YOUR SOCCESS STORY! 



Week after week, story after 



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to any audience anywhere! 

• STORIES that leave this week's 
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•ACTORS . . . always the perfect 
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• SETTINGS AND COSTUMES 

an artistic triumph for each program! 

• MUSIC AND DIRECTION 

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• PROMOTION . . . finest array 
of merchandising aids in TV history! 




NOT ANYWHERE, BY ANYONE, HAS TELEVISION BEEN SO HANDSOMELY AND LAVIS. 







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Cf 







►* 



ZIV TELEVISION PROGRAMS, INC. 

1519 MADISON *D„ CINCINNATI, OHIO 
NEW YORK HOLLYWOOD 



L 






















i 


City and state 


Market 
rank 


Call letters 
& channel 


On-air date* 


Power (kw) 


Net affll. 


No. TV 
stns on 
air now 


No. sets In 
mkt now" 


Licensee-owner 


Manager 


i 
d 

Sales rep 

1 


Visual 


Aural 


1 Atlantic City 


131 WFPG-TV(46) 
nk(52) 


21 Dec. '53 

nk 


18 9 All four 1 
20.5 12.3 


5,500 


Neptune Bdcstg. Corp. 
Matta Enterprises 


Blair K. Thron Pearson 

II 


i\eu? Bruns'ick 


WTLV(I9) 


Fall '53 


105 


53 




Dept. ot Educ. St. of N. 


"id 


New Mexico 

Santa Fe 


nk| 2) 


nk 


54 


27 




Greer & Greer 


i _ 
ur 


New York 

Albany 


34 WRTVM7) 


nk 


205 


110 


138,352 


Univ. of State of NY. 




Binghamton 


99 WQTY(46) 


nk 


200 


105 1 


95,000 


Univ. of State of N.Y. 


la 


Buffalo 

| 


14 WBUF(I7) 

WDDG(59) 
WTVF(23) 


Apr. '53 

Spring '53 
nk 


165 

91 
205 


83 1 

51 
105 


328,419 


Chautauqua Bdcstg. Corp 
(theatres) 

Buffalo- Niagara TV Corp 
Univ. of State of N.Y. 


Sherwln Gross- H-R Reps | 

man j| 

C 

■ 


If in irn 

• 


171 WTVE(24) 


Mar. '53 


58 


29 




Elmlra TV 


I 
Forjoe ' 

rl 


Ithaca 


WHCU-TV(20) 


15 Nov. '53 


212.5 105.2 


2,000 


Cornell Univ. 


M. R. Hanna 

n 


Jamestown 

I 


nk(58) 


nk 


100 


56 




James Bdcstg. Co. (WJTN) > 


I Kingston 


nk(66) 


nk 


25 


13.5 




Kingston Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WKNY) 


n 


I 

iVeu? York 


1 WGTV(25) 


nk 


205 


110 7 


3,230,000 


Univ. of State of N.Y. 


ii 


Poughkeepsie 


WEOK-TV(2l) 


Oct. '53 


105 


60 


50,000 


Mid -Hudson Brtcstrs. 
(WEOK) 


A. J. Barry Everett-McKlnnn r 


i, 
Rochester 

i 


39 WROH(2l) 


nk 


205 


105 1 


170,000 


Univ. of State of N.Y. 


.1: 


Syracuse 


53 WHTV(43) 


nk 


200 


105 2 


180,000 


Univ. of State of M.Y. 


1 


Watertown 


WWNY-TV(48! 


nk 


185 


100 




Brockway Co. (WWNY) 




North Carolina 

Asheville 


136 WISE-TV(62) 


1 June '53 


23 


13 


10,000 


WISE. Inc. 


Harold Thorns Boiling 

1 


Greensboro 


97 WCOG-TV(57) 


15 Aug. '53 


115 


59 1 


105,000 


Inter-City Adv. Co. of 
Greensboro 


Boiling 


Raleigh 


128 WETV(28) 


Apr. '53 


280 


145 


5,015 


Sir Walter TV & Bdcstg. Avery- Knodel 
Co. (WNAO) 


North Dakota 

Fargo 


nkt 6) 


nk 


70 


35 




WDAY. Inc. 




Ohio 

Akron 


46 WAKR-TV(49) 


Spring '53 


145 


73 


99,455 


Summit Radio Corp. 
(WAKR) 


: 

Weed 


Dayton 


41 WIFE(22) 


July '53 


210 


105 2 


216,000 


Skyland Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WONE) 


Headley-Reed , 




Lima 


169 WIMA-TV(35) 
WLOK-TV(73) 


Summer '53 
15 Mar. '53 


91 
20 


50 
II NBC 


10,000 


N. W. Ohio Bdcstg. Corp. Bob Mack Weed 
(WIMA) 

WLOK. Inc. Robert O. Run- H-R Repi 
nerstrom 


50 


- 


















SPONSOR 

1 

1 



City and state 



tsilon 



<ln.vf.-t j 



Market 
rank 



Call letters 
& channel 



Power (kw) 



No. TV 
stns on 
air now 



No. sets In 
mkt now" 



Licensee-owner 



Manager 



Sales rap 



WMAC-TV(23) I May '53 



nk(42 



99 50 



Midwest TV Co. 



Edward Lamb, 
pros. 



nk 



18 9.1 



Lake Erie Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WLEC) 



rren 



WHHH-TV(67 



nk 



80 43 



Warren Tribune Radio Sin. Carl J. Raymond 
(WHHH) 



mgstotcn 



33 WFMJ-TV(73 
WKBN-TV(27 

WUTV(2I 



6 Feb. '53 
5 Jan. '53 

July '53 



175 89 
160 95 

170 85 



NBC 

ABC, CBS, 
DuM 



90 189 Vindicator Printing Co. 

WKBN Bdcstg. Corp. 

Polan Industries 



Wm. F. Maag 
Jr. 



Warren William, 
son Jr. 



Ted Nelson 



Headley-Reed 
Raymer 



tesville 



ihoma 

vton 



•dan*! 



WHIZ-TV(50 



Apr. '53 



91 52 



3. E. Ohio TV System 
(WHIZ) 



Vernon A. Nolte Pearson 



KSWO-TV( 7 



I Mar. '53 



10 



4 000 Oklahoma Quality Bdcstg. Paul N. Goode Taylor 

Co. (KSWO, KRHD) 



20 



KPTV(27 



12 Oct. '52 88 44 NBC, ABC I 



53,000 



Empire Coil Co. 



Herbert Mayer NBC 



nsylvania 



oona 



hlehetn 



tton 



Trisburg 



zleton 



iiivioirn 



m ,iv Castle 



. 



iladelphia 



tsburgh 



ading 



•<IHlOII 



Ikes-Barre 



126 WFBG-TV(I0 



15 Feb. '53 316 160 NBC 



18,820 



Gable Bdcstg. Co. (WFBG) Jack Snyder 



H-R Reps 



43t WLEV-TV(5I 



Mar. '53 



2.25 2.25 NBC 



67,000 



Assoc. Bdcstrs. (WEST) Thomas Nunan Meeker 



43f WGLV(57 



Apr. '53 



125 63 



100,000 



Easton Publ. Co. (WEEX- N. Z. Rounsley Headley-Reed 

FM) 



61 WHP-TV(55 
WTPA(5I 



I Apr. '53 240 120 CBS 

nk 220 110 



57,581 WHP ' lnc - 

Harrlsburg Bdcstrs. 



A. K. Redmond Boiling 



48t WAZL-TV(63 



Oct. '53 



98 52 



6,000 



Haileton Bdcstg. Co. 
(WAZL) 



Vic Dlehra 



Meeker 



64 WARD-TV (56 



nk 



91 46 



184,000 



Rlvoli Realty Co. 



Weed 



151 WKST-TV(45 



Feb. '53 



20.5 105 



WKST, Inc. (WKST) 



WIP-TV(29 



nk 



275 140 



1,181,000 



Pennsylvania Bdcstg. Co. Benedict Glmbel 

(WIP) Jr. 



8 WTVOH7 

WENS! 16 
WKJF-TV(53 



Aug. '53 

Summer '53 
May '53 



230 120 

89 50 
258.1 130 



550 000 Gallaher, Berry & Wood- 

' yard 

Telecasting Co. of Plttsb. 

Mrs. A. J. R. Greer F. G. Raese 

(WAJR. WDNE. WJER) 



Headley-Reed 



76 WEEU-TV(33 
WHUM-TV(6I 



I Mar '53 
8 Feb. '53 



225 120 NBC 

260 135 CBS 



&8 304 Hawley Bdcstg. Co. 

' (WEEU) 



Thomas E. Mar- Headley-Reed 
tin 



Eastern Radio Corp. Humboldt J. H-R Reps 

(WHUM) Grelg (pres.) 



75 WGBI-TV(22 
WTVU(73 



Apr. '53 290 150 CBS 

Apr. '53 I I 5.9 



30,000 



Scranton Bdcstrs. (WGBI) George D. Cole- Blalr-TV 
man 



Appalachian Co. 



Jan King 



Boiling 



48 WBRE-TV(28 
WILK-TVI34 



I Jan. '53 
Apr. '53 



Uiamsport 158 WRAK-TV(36 



nk 



1,000 500 NBC, CBS I 

250 130 ABC, DuM 

21 10.5 



17,000 



Louis G. Baltimore 
(WBRE) 



Louis G. Baltl- Headley-Reed 

more 



Wyoming Valley Bdcstg. Roy E. Morgan Avery- Knodel 

Co. (WILK) 



WRAK. Inc. 



G. E. Joy 



McKinney 



(Please turn to page 58) 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



51 



HOME IMPROVEMENT 



FOOD FREEZERS 



SPONSOR: Pel on Co. AGENCY': Roy Garn 

I UPSULE CAS1 HISTORY: A station in a suburban 
area where there are plenty of private homes — like 11 HLl. 
Hempstead was ideal for this home-improvement con- 
tractor [roofing, siding, installation ) . In the latter jiart 
of l').~>2. Peterson ran 14 one-minute announcements a 
neck jor jour months on H HLL pitching the company's 
services. As a result. Peterson teas bombarded with SO 
many leads that the firm could not handle all the busi- 
ness, icus forced to go of] the air for several months in 
order to catch up. The average lead amounted to $1,000 
in business. Advertising cost: $10 an announcement. 

Will. I. Hempstead, 1.. I.. N. Y. PROGRAM: Announcements 




results 



, ■■.,. 



KITCHEN UNITS 



SPONSOR: Leeke's AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: One morning, on their early 
a.m. (6:45 to 7:00 a.m.) program. Melody Farm Time, 
Leeke's hardware advertised a special on Youngstoivn 
kitchens and cabinet sinks. They offered the cabinet sinks 
loi $99.50 instead of the regular $129.95. No other ad- 
vertising was used. By noon the same day, they had sold 
three cabinet sinks, plus one complete kitchen unit for 
$450. They also sold o'her items to people attracted to the 
store by the special. The total volume of business they 
had done by noon was $1,500. The advertising costs came 
to .01 2' f of this amount excluding p.m. results. 



WKHM, Jackson, Mich. 



PROGR \M: M.T.dv Farm Time 



BAKERY 



SPONSOR: Love's Bakery AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For nearly three years, 
l.mc s Bakery in Honolulu sponsored a Monday-through- 
Friday (6:30 to 6: 15 p.m.) kids show, Uncle Bob's Storj 
Book Fair, on kll.l. In connection with the program, 

Lores ran an annuid "free fair" at which the children 
tinned in bread wrappers and other proofs of purchase 
for rides. It one fair, Love's hail expected a potential 
attendance of 5,000 or 6,000 at a one-day event; but the 
unexpectedly heavy influx of children forced them to turn 
it into a three-day affair which attracted over 20,000 
bread wrapper-bearing youngsters. 

Kl I \. Honolulu, Hawaii PROGR VM: I ncle Bob's Story 

l'>« ><>k Fair 



SPONSOR: Vrontikis Bros. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : Located outside the down- 
town business district, this Salt Lake City appliance dealer 
was selling about 12 freezers a month. Then he pur- 
chased a series of participating announcements — 182 in 
all — to be aired on KD} L during the period of one 
month. During this month, he sold 60 food-plans-and- 
freezers. Since each sale averaged $675, Vrontikis' gross 
jumped from $8,100 to $40,500 that month. Sponsor was 
so impressed with this increase and with accelerated store 
traffic and phone inquiries, he has bought more announce- 
ments, also sponsors football games. 

KDYL. Salt Lake City PROGRAM : Participations 



AUTO INSURANCE 



SPONSOR: W. S. Hendrickson Insurance AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : This insurance agency n ant- 
ed to sell a monthly automobile insurance payment plan, 
to acquaint the public with its three locations, and to es- 
tablish the firm name in Indianapolis and vicinity. To 
accomplish this, it bought a 15-minute transcribed music 
program, Sundays at 12:45 p.m. The sponsor, W. S. 
Hendrickson, feels it is sufficient commentary on the suc- 
cess of the s'.ation to state that in the past 12 months 
his business has doubled: firm name is established. 



WXLW. Indianapolis 



PROGRAM: Transcribed music 



LABOR PROBLEM 



WCKB, Dunn, N. C. 



COSMETIC OFFER 



SPONSOR: Hazel Bishop, Inc. 

CAPSULE < VSE HISTORY : 
Complexion Clow (cheek color) a new sales impetus, 
Raymond Spector selected two afternoon NBC Radio net- 
ii oil, programs aimed at ivomen: Lorenzo Jones, a Mon- 
ilm -Wednesday-Friday serial (5:30 to 5:45 p.m.); and 
Inside News from Hollywood, daily, 2:55 to 3:00 p.m. 
{covering a total of some ](>(> stations). On the shows 
they offered a 10^ trial j>ackage of Complexion Clow. 
II illiin the first four days, an avalanche of over 100.000 
dimes poured in. The offer pulled a total of more than 
156,000 dimes — and tins during August "slump" time. 



NBC Radio network 



PROGRAM: Lorenzo Jones; 

In-idi- New- from Hollywood 



SPONSOR: Erwin Mills AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Each spring and fall, this 
manufacturer of denim fabrics had from 50 to 300 ma- 
chines idle because employees — who were also farm peo- 
ple — were taking time off to do planting or harvesting. 
In June 1952 the company launched a weekly Sunday 
gospel-singing program on WCKB. "Commercials" re- 
ported the advantages of working at the mill including 
higher pay. U ithin three days after the first broadcast. 
200 job applicants sivartned in. The fall of '52 showed no 
seasonal labor shortage for the first lime in the firm's his- 
tory — they noiv have a labor backlog. Cost: $30 a week. 



PROGRAM: The Erwin Mills Program 



\( . I \< 'l Ka\ mond Spectoi 
To give Hazel Bishop's 



What's "Countrypolitan"? 

ans.: Big Aggie Land — the market put together 
by WNAX *How big? One million radio families with annual 
effective buying income of $4.2 billion. Only metropolitan 
NYC and Chicago are bigger. Where? In Minnesota, the 

Dakotas, Nebraska and Iowa. How much? One Class A 

Chainbreak (one-time rate) is $20.00 




9 FEBRUARY 1953 



53 




FEATURE FOODS 




EFFECTIVE 
WOMEN'S SHOWS 

On each station, an established 
radio personality conducts a daily 
women's program packed tight 
with gaiety, fun, music, helpful 
hints and hard selling for your 
products — with assists by top- 
notch male announcers and pop- 
ular keyboard wizards. 




GUARANTEED 
DISTRIBUTION 

In each territory, trained mer- 
chandising field-women make 
dozens of daily calls on impor- 
tant chain and independent 
outlets — guarantee distribution 
for your products because gro- 
cers know that "Feature Foods" 
creates heavy consumer demand. 



Stations KYW in Philadelphia and WHO in 
Des Moines now offer a few more participations 
in their amazing; "Feature Foods" programs — 
the most effective, integrated advertising-and- 
merchandisiiig service ever conceived in the 
grocery-store field. 

Dozens of national food-products manufac- 



turers have proved that this plan works, an< 
works at lowest overall costs. 

Free & Peters, Inc., have all the facts — all 
the proof — all the cost data. Telephone anj 
F & P office, or mail the coupon. No ohligatioi 
— but if you are interested, we urgently advist 
prompt action. 






ING 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 



IOWA? 



. 



ROMOTION DOES IT 




GUARANTEED 
PRODUCT DISPLAY 

In each area, the field workers see 
thai your product is prominently 
displayed — install "Feature Foods" 
shelf talkers, put up display mate- 
rial, install and service special store- 
promotion booths where products 
are displayed, couponed and sam- 
pled, if desired. 



ATLANTA 

Palmer Bldg. 
Main 5667 





GUARANTEED 
MERCHANDISING REPORTS 

In each area, progress reports are 
given you twice each month, covering 
all merchandising work done, giving 
you a check on distribution and expo- 
sure in each store, plus details on 
competitive activity and comments of 
grocers. Net result — greater promo- 
tion, greater control, greater sales! 



Free & Peters, inc. 



NEW YORK 

444 Madison Av 

Plaza 1-2700 



CHICAGO 

230 N. Michigan Ave. 

Franklin 2-6373 



DETROIT 

Penobscot Bldg. 

Woodward 1-4255 



FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 

Fortune 3349 



HOLLYWOOD 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood 9-2151 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Russ Bldg. 

Sutter 1-3798 



GENTLEMEN: 

Without obligation, please rush me my free copies of KYW's and 
WHO's Fact Books on "Feature Foods". 



[IIIIIIII1UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ]i!!llll!)l[l!i!IIIIIIIUI!!!lllllllllll!!!lll!!lllllllllllllll!IIIIIIU!lllll!llllllllllll]llll!U 

I TV film shows recently made available for syndication I 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

The chart below was gathered through a survey of 150 It is designed as a quick reference for buyers interested 
syndicators who were asked to list shows recently made in following new product as it comes to market. This film 
available [in the past three months) for syndication. chart will be a regular SPONSOR feature in alternate issues. 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



Price Range* No. in series 



ANIMATED 



Jim & Judy in 
Tele-land 



Tele. Screen 
Prod. 



Tele. Screen 
Prod. 



50% of I -time 39 

station rate 



Foy Willing and RCA Recorded Foy Willing TV 15 min. 

the Riders of the Program Serv- Prod. 
Purple Sage Ices 



AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION QUIZ 



View the Club United Artists Goldstone Prod. I2'i min. $40-255 



MYSTERY 



Capsule Mysteries Charles Michel- Charles Michel- 5 min. 
son, Inc. son, Inc. 



CHILDREN'S 



NEWS 



Betsy and the 


Jamieson 


TV 


Jamieson Fi 


lm 


12 min. 


Magic Key 


Prod. 




Co. 






King Calico 


Goodman 




CNC Prod. 




15 min. 


Magic Lady 


Official 




Telemount 




8' 2 min 



COMEDY 



Fearless Fosdlck Sterling TV 



Life of Riley 



NBC TV Film 
Sales 



Tom McKnight 



30 min. 

Ill mm 



Dally News 


INS 




Telenews 




12 min. 


Daily News 


NBC TV 
Sales 


Film 


NBC 




5 min. 


Telenews Weekly 


INS 




Telenews 




l2'/ 2 min. 


Weekly News 


NBC TV 
Sales 


Film 


NBC 




15 min. 


United Press 


United Press 


UP-20th 


Cent. 


10-20 min 


Movietone 






Fox 







SPORTS 



Paul Kllliam Show 
Studs Place 


Sterling TV 
Goodman 


Saul J 
Biggie 


Turell 
Levin 


15 
10 


min. 
min. 


26 

65 


DRAMA 


American Wit and 


March of Time 


March 


of Time 


to 


min. 


13 



American Sports PSI-TV. Inc. 



Robert Sheets 13' i min. 



Beat the Experts 


Sterling TV 


Telenews 


Prod., 


15 


min. 


$45-150 


(variety) 




Inc. 










Beat the Experts 


Sterling TV 


Telenews 


Prod., 


3 


4 m ; n . 


$15-50 


(quiz) 




Inc. 










Dally Sports 


INS 


Telenews 
Inc. 


Prod., 


3 1 


2 min. 





Douglas Fairbanks NBC TV Film 
Presents Sales 



Doug Fair Corp 30 min. 



Favorite Story 


Zlv 


Zlv 


30 


min. 


$115-3.000 


Into the Night 


Sterling TV 


Saul J. Turell 


30 


min. 




Little Theatre 


Teevee Co. 


Teevee Co. 


1 •> 


min. 




Night Editor 


Goodman 


Mansfield Enter- 
prises 


15 


min. 




Orient Express 


PSI-TV, Inc. 


John Nasht 


26' 


2 min. 




Our Living Lan- 


March of Time 


March of Time 


l 


min. 




guage 













Play of the Week PSI-TV, Inc. 

Sovereign Theatre Stuart Reynolds 



Edward Lewis 26' 



Gil Ralston 26 

Arthur Ripley 



; min. 
min. 



100% Class A 



39 
26 
52 



26 
26 
13 



Famous Fights 
from Madison 
Sq. Garden 

Madison Square 
Garden 

Madison Square 
Garden 

This Week in 
Sports 



Du Mont Film Winik Films 

Sates 



Du Mont Film Winik Films 

Sales 



Du Mont Film Winik Films 

Sales 



$50-500 

$50-400 
$80-750 



WESTERN 



Annie Oakley 
Cowboy "G" 



Gene Autry Fly- CBS TV Film 
ing A Pictures Sales 



Henry B. Dono- 
van 



30 min. 
26' i min. 



$100-1.500 



INTERVIEW 



WOMAN'S NEWS 



NBC TV Film 
Sales 



Chuck Kebbe 



For Women Only Telenews 



12' j min. 



Show name 


Syndicator 


Producer 


Length 


Price Range* 


No. ins 








MUSICAL 









13 

65 

65 
Mon- 
26 1 

26 1 

26 



26 plaal 



Where price range is not given it has not yet been fixed; or syndicator prefers to give p r ice only on request 



56 



SPONSOR 



Want to sample thrills thousands of miles aw ay 

make back-at-home armchair viewers pick up and GO? Want to do ail this 
effectively and at low cost? Yes? Then . . . IKE Ell M 




^■^f . — ©■ f v 



^ 




- *,, 



For complete information write tot Motion Picture Film Department, 
Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester 4, N. Y. East Coast Division, 342 
Madison Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. niidwmst Division, 1 37 North 
Wabash Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois. West Coast Division, 6706 Santa 
Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38, California. 




4 



****** 





blew and upcoming TV stations 


i Continued f 


roni j>a<ce 5] i 
















\ 

City and state 


Market 
rank 


Call letters 
& channel 


On-air date" 


Power 


<kw) 


Net affil. 


N 
St 

a 


o. TV 

ns on 
r now 


No. sets in 
mkt now*' 


Licensee-owner 


Manager 


Sales rep 


Visual 


Aural 


Pa. (cont'd) 

York- 


92 WNOW-TV(49) 
WSBA-TV(43) 


Apr. '53 

21 Dec. '52 


96 

170 


54 

86 


DuM 

ABC 


1 


20,000 


Helm Coal Co. (WNOW) 

Susquehanna Bdcstg. 
(WSBA) 


Lowell Williams 

Walter J. Roth- 
ensies 


Hollingbery 
Radio & TV Reps 


SOUth Carolina 

Charleston 


1 II 


WCSC-TV( 5) 


Apr. '53 


100 


50 









WCSC. Inc. 




Free & Peters 


Columbia 


123 


WCOS-TV(25) 
WNOK-TV(67) 


Apr. '53 
Apr. '53 


89 
780 


45 
390 


ABC, NBC 
CBS, DuM 





8,000 


Radio Columbia (WCOS) 

Palmetto Radio Corp. 
(WNOK) 


Chas W. Pitt, 
man 


Headley-Reed 
Raymer 


Greenville 


106 


nk(23) 


nk 


22 


1 1 









Greenville TV Co. 






South Dakota 

Nion.v Falls 


181 


KELO-TV(II) 


1 Apr. '53 


57 


29 







20,000 


Midcontinent Bdcstg. Co. 
(KELO) 


E. Nord 


Taylor 


1 Tennessee 

Chattanooga 

i , ._, 


80 


WOUC(49) 
WTVT(43) 


nk 
nk 


20 
275 


10 
!40 







7,915 


Chattanooga T-V, Inc. 
Tom Potter 




McGillvra 


Texas 

Atnarillo 

1 

1 


170 


KFDA-TV(IO) 
KGNC-TV( 4) 


Mar. '53 
1 May '53 


56 

100 


30 

50 


NBC, DuM 





7,800 


Amarillo Bdcstg. Corp. 
(KFDA) 

Plains Radio Bdcstg. Co. 
(KGNC. KFYO) 


Tom Kritser 


Branham 
Taylor 


1 Austin 


110 


KCTV(I8) 
KTBC-TV( 7) 

KTVA(24) 


nk 

27 Nov. '52 

nk 


210 

100 

280 


105 
51 

145 


All four 


1 


18,180 


Capital City TV Co. 

Texas Bdcstg. Corp. 
(KTBC) 

Tom Potter 


J C. Kellam 


Taytor 


Beaumont 


95 


KBMT(3I) 


May '53 


14 


7.1 







7,029 


Television Bdcstrs. 






Dallas 


24 


nk(23) 


nk 


220 


1 16 




3 


225,000 
(Dallas- 
Ft. W.) 


UHF Television Co. 




t 


El Paso 


93 


KEPO-TV(l3) 
KROD-TV( 4) 
KTSM-TVI 9) 


Apr. '53 
14 Dec. '52 
4 Jan. '53 


120 
56 

58 


60 

28 

29 


ABC 

CBS, DuM 
NBC 


2 


11,693 


KEPO, Inc. 

Roderick Bdcstg. Corp. 
(KROD) 

Trl-State Bdcstg. Co. 
(KTSM) 


Miller C. Rob- 
ertson 

Val Lawrence 
Karl O. Wyler 


Avery- Knedel 

Taylor 

Hollingbery 


Galveston 


142 


KGUL-TV(ll) 
KTVR(4I) 


Mar. '53 

nk 


59 
230 


30 
120 







12,781 


Gulf TV Co. 
Rudman TV Co. 


M. B. Rudman 




Houston 


18 


KUHT( 8) 

KNUZ-TV(39) 
nl<(23) 


Apr. '53 

June '53 

nk 


30.2 

100 
176 


15.4 

50 

88 




1 


221,000 


Univ. of Houston 

KNUZ TV Co. 
UHF Television Co. 


J. C. Shwarzwal- 
der 

Dave Morris 


Forjoe 


l.uhhocU 


156 


KCBD-TV(II) 
KDUB-TV(I3) 


Mar. '53 
13 Nov. '52 


92 
31 


46 
15.5 


NBC, ABC 
CBS, DuM 


1 


8.700 


Bryant Radio & TV, Inc. 
(KCBD) 

Texas Telecasting. Inc. 


Joe H. Bryant 
W. D. Rogers Jr. 


Pearson 
Avery- Knodel 


Van Angela 


186 


KGKL-TVI 3) 
KTXL-TV( 8) 


nk 
Mar. '53 


64 
1 1 


3.2 
5.5 









KGKL. Inc. 

Wcstox TV Co. (KTXL) 






Waco 


134 


KANG-TV(34) 


June '53 


5 


3 









Central Texas TV Co. 







58 



(Please turn to page 78) 



SPONSOR 




For an NBC documentary . . . 
the production excellence of a 

TV Film 
a la Klin 




When the National Broadcasting 
Company undertakes a filmed tele- 
vision documentary series, you can be 
sure it will be done right. NBC made 
sure by assigning the production of its 
current half-hour film on Frank Lloyd 
Wright to Kling Studios. 

Kling set designers recreated the 
architect's study on the sound stage in 
Kling's Chicago studio, using a photo- 
mural made by Kling's technicians at 
Wright's Taliesin home. While interior 
shooting was in progress, other Kling 
crews were filming location shots in 
Wisconsin and Arizona. Assignments 
were timetable-controlled so that all 
processing, cutting and editing of film 
could be accomplished in quick order at 
Kling's Chicago studio. 

Why not insure the success of your 
television show the way NBC does? 
Kling serves many of the country's 
outstanding advertisers with TV film 
shows and commercials . . . economical- 
ly produced in our Chicago and Hol- 
lywood studios with the modern multi- 
camera technique. 

Kling in Hollywood offers you the 
artistry, star casting, sets and unlim- 
ited facilities of the world's film center, 
including award-winning animation by 
our new division, Ray Patin Produc- 
tions. 

Add to this, a highly skilled perma- 
nent staff of writers, directors and 
technicians, and you see why Kling 
gives you the best in advertising know- 
manship plus Hollywood showmanship. 



TELEVISION • MOTION PICTURES • SLIDE 
FILMS • PHOTOGRAPHY* ADVERTISING 
AND EDITORIAL ART DISPLAYS 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



59 









WHEN 

]/[| ' IH.MI IK'M HUTU I IMII\ rllE 

TELEVISION 

gives! 

1 a3 




complete 
coverage 



ITS POWER IS NOW 
50,000 WATTS 

IT HAS A NEW TOWER 
1914 FT. ABOVE SEA LEVEL. 

IT IS CENTRAL NEW YORK'S 
MOST POWERFUL TV STATION. 

IT IS LOCATED IN THE 
HEART OF AN 
INDUSTRIAL AREA. 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 



(WHEN 

TELEVISION 

\smcusE, 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
A MEREDITH STATION 




agency profile 



Bob Dulley 

V.P. and general manager 
McCann-Erickson, Inc., Cleveland 



Robert Winston Dailey has a facility for cracking hard nuts. 

Item : Fresh out of the University of Toledo, a cub reporter on 
The Toledo Blade, he dictated a blow-by-blow account of a strike 
from under a desk in the riot-bound Electric Auto-Lite plant. For 
this he won a by-line, a raise, and an Editor & Publisher write-up. 

Item: After four years at the Blade and eight with NBC's WTAM 
in Cleveland, he accepted the challenge of an agency executive, wrote 
50 commercials at home, and was hired by McCann-Erickson. 

Item : During eight vears as radio-TV director and later as an 
account executive, Bob supervised The Sohio Reporter's rise to Ohio's 
best-known and most widely listened to radio news program. Re- 
cently, The Sohio Reporter has also become a TV news program and 
has won several polls and awards in its category. 

Item : Of many TV successes, Bob's establishment of a top-flight 
first-run feature film program opposite highly rated Shoiv of Shows 
resulted in the Leisy Premiere Theatre acquiring the dominant share 
of Saturday night viewing. His latest TV venture is helping create 
and produce a half-hour Sunday public service program Prescription 
for Living for Standard Oil of Ohio over an Ohio network. It has 
been called by critics "Cleveland's finest program effort to date." 

Item: Early in his career at McCann-Erickson, Bob helped create 
The Ohio Story on radio for the Ohio Bell Telephone Co. It won 
12 awards or citations, was credited with directly producing revenue 
three times the cost of the program. Then, under TVs impact, the 
listeners dropped from over a million per program to 610.000. 

Bob's solution: ill Make the show a story-teller's instead of a 
dramatic program and tape it, thus cutting .$50,000 on production 
and talent costs; (2) cut the show from 15 minutes to 10 three times 
a week and use the savings to add more stations; (3) put the show 
on in the morning in major TV towns; (4) expand evening radio 
coverage in non-TV towns. 

Result: Since its new format last June, The Ohio Story maintained 
its same high share of audience in all cities yet the cost-per-1,000 
listeners decreased 14 f /< — this despite serious losses in radio sets- 
in-use in most markets. The $50,000 which the sponsor saved, went 
into TV announcements. 

Today, Bob Daile) tackles even greater challenges in hi< new role 
as general manager of the Cleveland office of McCann-Erickson. 
Marion Harper Jr.. Bob's boss in \e\\ York, commented to SPONSOR, 
"Bob is not only an able operator, he's a resourceful one. ' * * * 



60 



SPONSOR 



WASHINGTON 



7<& 



KXL-Portland 



OREGON 



I 

KXLY— Spokane 



.'MONTANA 
I 



^9 * *l B KXLL-Missoula 



KXLK-Great Falls 



KXLJ-Helena 
t7~ mmm *\ IDAHO j'KXLF-Bune 

• ; 



KXLQ— Bozeman 



The Greatest Single 
Advertising Medium In The 

?ast growing -Wealthy 
Pacific Northwest 



THE (XL) STATIONS 



KXL-Portland KXLF-Butte 

KXLY-Spokane KXIK-Great Falls 



KXLL— Missoula KXLQ— Bozeman 

KXLJ-Helena 



New York 17, N. Y. 
347 Madison Avenue 
The Walker Company 



Hollywood 28, Calif. 

6381 Hollywood Blvd. 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



San Francisco 4, Calif. 

79 Post Street 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



Chicago 1, Illinois 
360 North Michigan 
The Walker Company 



PLUS 

The highest Television Station in the Pacific Northwest 

KXLY-TV 

Atop Mt. Spokane Elevation 6018 ft. 





EIow can TV develop enough new talent to supply 
its urgent neetl for a greater variety of faces? 



Homer H. Evans, Jr. 



Director of Advertising and Promotion 
James Lees & Sons 
Bridgeport, Pa. 



The 

picked panel 
answers 
Evans 




Mr. Barnum 



To me, the ques- 
tion is best an- 
swered by telling 
what is being 
done to supply 
new faces for TV. 
In our organiza- 
tion there are 
two men who do 
virtually nothing 
but audition new 
talent. This is a 
continuing operation. 

It is practically a tradition that 
everyone has "written a book," "writ- 
ten a play," or "written a song." They 
are also convinced that they can per- 
form on television. \ou'd be amazed 
at the number of auditions I've had 
when a taxi driver is told to drop me 
off at NBC. This also held for one 
particular singing elevator operator 
who used to trap me regularly alone 
on a 55-floor ascent. 

But no matter where they come 
from, whether it is a sponsor's niece 
or a man off the street, they're all given 
a chance for two reasons: first, as a 
matter of courtesy, and second, we are 
always sincerely looking for new talent. 
After the screening, the performers 
showing dramatic talent are brought 
to the attention of producers and di- 
rectors of dramatic shows, and as 
many of them as possible are used. 
As far as comedy and vocal talent 
is concerned, under the Comedy De- 
velopment Plan we set up hour audi- 
tions in front of a studio audience for 
the Program Department. As you 



know, it has been our practice to hire 
writers to provide material for some 
of the more promising of these young- 
sters. 

After the act is well broken in, they 
are re-auditioned and next moved into 
any available spots on variety shows. 

So much for young untried talent. 
Beyond that, we are constantly search- 
ing for new faces in clubs, presenta- 
tion houses, resorts. Broadway shows. 
"How can TV develop enough new 
talent to supply its urgent need for a 
greater variety of faces?" The answer 
in brief is: by the conscientious effort 
of the personnel involved in the medi- 
um to make an endless search for 
fresh, new talent. This we do. 

Pete Barnum 

Manager of New Program 
Development 

NBC 

New York 



Why strive de- 
liberately, for 
new faces when 
we see at every 
turn that it is the 
familiar face that 
pulls television's 
biggest audiences. 
Look at the top 
20 or 30— there 
is a familiar face 
in each. 

Suppose we consider television as, 
for example, a small town. People who 
live in small towns do not complain 
about seeing the same old faces over 
and over, but, instead, grow to like 
them. The familiar face is the heart of 
a village and will be the heart of TV. 
But, if it does become necessary to 
expand television's gallery of faces, 
there will not be too much difficulty. 




Mr. Beal 



Already we have more good actors and 
actresses than we have roles, more 
singers than we have songs to be sung, 
more announcers than commercials, 
and as many comedians as material. 

Fitting the right performer to the 
right spot is more complex, however. 
Most producers I know carry around 
in their heads two or three promising 
pieces of talent they would like to try, 
but they have no place to try them. 
The right combination is hard both to 
find and to put to use. 

ff we assume we have to have new 
faces, the first step lies in educating 
people who have a voice in talent se- 
lection. Names which are as big as a 
wall to the average high school kid or 
grocery clerk are totally unknown to 
many of the people who sit in meetings, 
putting shows together. If worse comes 
to worst, we can always copy baseball's 
scouting and farm system. It is pretty 
expensive. Chances are we'll never 
need it. 

Jim Bealle 

Head of Talent Department 

BBDO 

New York 



TV program ech- 
elons haven't, as 
yet, developed a 
single stellar per- 
former of its own 
medium, and hav- 
ing just about 
exhausted the top- 
level talent po- 
tential with the 
rapid dissipation 
of names, it looks 
like the talent procurement boys will 
really have to go to work. 

The great TV standards, as estab- 
lished by the stars of the theatre and 




Mr. Franlcel 



62 



SPONSOR 



variety fields, have set a phenomenal 
pace in TV entertainment — and the re- 
placements must come from the same 
sources. Just as happened in the past, 
they'll spring from cafes, or theatres, 
or even walkathons. 

However, that new talent isn't going 
to walk in and hit the program exec on 
the chin. People who want new faces 
are going to have to go out and dig 
them up. I see the pattern this way : 

1. The talent is on the vine, but the 
vine can be a nightclub, vaudeville, or 
minor TV station. 

2. This in turn requires someone to 
do the searching who will recognize the 
quality and potential of talent. 

3. And, most important of all, that 
someone must also know how to ease 
the new talent along in its develop- 
ment from, let's say, radio to TV. Only 
the great personalities are able to over- 
come inept direction and production 
and move from one medium to another 
with a minimum of transitional chaos. 

All of which means: Sure, the talent 

is there but you have to know where 

to get it, how to recognize it. and 

finally, just how to handle it. 

Henry Frankel 

Director, New Programing & 

Talent Development 
Rulhrauff & Ryan 
New York 



From where will 
television get its 
talent for the 
many, many 
hours of TV over 
the years to 
come? We all 
ask it. And the 
answer is easy. 
Television will 
Mr. Wight grow talent as 

any new industry 
grows the people in it. Thirty years 
ago in the horse age, people talked of 
air travel in just this way. "Who is 
going to be good enough to fly those 
big planes of the future?" Remember? 
The future was almost too fantastic to 
imagine. And yet today horses are 
largely relegated to films and to the 
category of playthings, while kids talk 
of "supersonic sciences" and "jet pro- 
pulsion" as we used to talk of "mile-a- 
minute" speed. 

To begin with. TV utilized the radio 
people. Then they tapped the film 
{Please turn to page 90) 







McCALL'S 

National Award 

to WOMEN in 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

FOR OUTSTANDING 

PUBLIC SERVICE 

won by 

CKLW'S 
MARY MORGAN 

This important award was pre- 
sented to Miss Morgan for her 
outstanding radio series in a fight 
against narcotics. Further proof 
of the fine type programming 
that has made CKLW a favorite 
in the Detroit area. 



For The Greatest Sales Push in The Detroit Area It's 

CKLW 



Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 



Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Representatives 



I E. Campeau 
President 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



63 



Radio 







...and now a message 



{ I0 n our sponsot 



TV 



by Bob Foreman 



1 was riffling through my morn- 
ing".-, mail recently and found, re- 
posing among the communiques 
from tailors, stockbrokers, and 
time salesmen, a letter which went 
thus and so: 

"Dear Mr. Foreman: 

"I am a successful advertise- 
ment writer (print). I should like 
to become a successful advertise- 
ment writer (TV). 

"What methods would you sug- 
gest to speed this transition? 

Sincerely, 
An Interested Reader from 
the Midwest" 

Since Interested Reader has 
stated that he does not mind receiv- 
ing an answer in the form of a pub- 
lic notice, I'll try to put my ideas 
on the subject down here. But he- 
fore doing so, let me preface my 
remarks with this thought: Mr. 
I.R., you are very fortunate indeed 
that your background is print ad- 
vertising. In fact, no experience — 
whether it be in film work or in 
live television production or an 
animation studio - is better than 
yours. 



There are two reasons for this. 
One important. The other a wee 
bit unfortunate. First, television 
copy is advertising. At least, it's 
intended to be. As such it is di- 
rected at the same creatures who 
read and react to print advertising. 
The only difference in them is that 
they possess a simulated-mahog- 
any box, fronted with glass, and 
clogged with wires, from which 
come noises and pictures in vary- 
ing degrees of clarity. 

Therefore, it is safe to assume 
that these creatures react the same 
way to the same stimuli. Tell them 
via television that they will become 
more lovely, more successful, more 
comfortable by using certain prod- 
ucts and you are talking their lan- 
guage — for these appeals are just 
as basic and effective in TV as thev 
are in magazine or newspaper ad- 
vertising. 

It's the technique — the mechan- 
ics — of the media that vary. Ap- 
peals never do. So as a print writ- 
er you know what works appeal- 
wise. You've seen scores of head- 
lines that pull and body copy that 
gathers in the returns and price 



luililiiiililiilllllllllllillliiiillilllllliii 



lli;illll!llllllllll!!l!!llll!illll!!llira 



Bob Foreman's advice to aspiring TV copywriters: 

1. // you had print media experience, u^" it — don'! he ashamed of it. \lost 
advertisers and agencymen are old hands at joint media advertising themselves 

2. Watch a good samnling oj II commercials daily. You'll develop a taste 
tor tin- type ot copy llmt tame* m ross to lieieers: apply taste to your copy 

It. I isit studios to study the techniques oj translating copy into live or film 
commercials. Get to I, now directors, camera anil audio men, as well as admen 

I. Plunge in ami write soon- unsolicited II copy, make stick figures to illus- 
trate in lion, correlate audio to individual ironies, give camera, audio directions 

.■>. Iri out youi copy with ■-lop watch in hand, following stiil. figure instruc- 
tions, allowing lor transitions: then discuss unit efforts with directors, 
camera men. agency people. Let then: check \our timing, giie suggestions 






ads that unload counters the very 
next morning. You've seen long- 
term series that have changed the 
attitude of millions toward a com- 
pany. That's old hat to you and 
feel good that it is! 

So, Mr. I.R., consider yourself 
way ahead . . . ahead of many now 
getting into this business from 
fields that may seem much more 
closely allied to television (such 
as the film business, animation, 
Little Theatre movements, etc.). 

What to do first? Well, since ex- 
perience has always been the best 
teacher, the best way to learn to 
write television copy is to start 
writing it. When, you do, you'll 
have to get mixed up with film 
folks if your copy is going onto 
film. You'll have to get mixed up 
with camera men and directors and 
audio men, if it's intended as a 
live presentation. By discussing 
your efforts with these, by seeing 
what mechanical as well as crea- 
tive problems your words and pic- 
tures present to the other people 
involved, you'll learn a lot. 

I just glanced at the dateline on 
your letter and find that it reads 
"Kansas City." So television is 
familiar to you as a viewer as well 
as an advertising man. This means, 
I'm sure, that you've seen a lot of 
copy televised. Unless you are dif- 
ferent from every other advertis- 
ing person I've ever met, you've 
formed a lot of opinions as to 
what is good TV advertising and 
what seems to create an unsavory 
aroma. I'd say they are pretty 
valid opinions. You are no neo- 
phyte in advertising copy. 

Now, I mentioned there was a 
second and "unfortunate" reason 
that a print background was high- 
ly desirable for a TV copywriter. 
This reason is simply the historical 
fact that most of. the advertisers 
and most of the agency people, es- 
pecially account men. with whom 
you will deal as a TV-copy man 
are old hands at print advertising. 
When they learn that you too came 
from this solid realm and not from 
movieland or summer stock, they 
are far more likely to listen to you 
and accept what you write. I called 



64 



SPONSOR 



A itvtrtixement 



T. V. story board 

A column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

SARRA 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




wise 



Wise's trade-mark, the wise old owl, is deftly exploited for maximum 
product identification in this effective TV spot. "Hoots" of praise, against 
a chorus of voices, carol the catchy theme song that precedes the "straight" 
sales story given by the Wise home economist. This merges into live action 
home and party scenes climaxed by a reprise of the owl animation and theme 
song. Created by SARRA for Wise Potato Chip Company through Lynn- 
Fieldhouse. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 







A minute of stop-motion magic — that's the newest of many TV commercials 
made by SARRA for Pet Milk Company. A chair pulls itself up to the table; 
a cup fills with coffee; a can pours the milk; the cup empties itself; a can 
hops from the shelf to the carriage. It's amazing, it's entertaining, it's product 
identification, it's pure sell. Used by Pet as a spot and on the All Star Revue 
. . . with brilliant reproduction assured by SARRA'S Vide-o-riginal prints. 
Produced through Gardner Advertising Company. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




Again SARRA has been chosen by Cecil & Presbrey, Inc. to produce Electric 
Auto-Lite's series saluting automobile manufacturers of America in 2-minute 
TV commercials used on Suspense. In this spot, the New Hudson Jet is 
shown and discussed by Mr. N. K. Van Derzee, Hudson's Vice President in 
Charge of Sales. Other cars, all Auto-Lite users, to be similarly featured are 
Chrysler, De Soto, Dodge, Kaiser-Frazer, Nash, Plymouth, Studebaker and 
Willys. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



65 



ti\$ came 



,\ m w 



hhjbin 




W Mr 



harry m. 



uller, 



illCt odvcrliiing.. merchandising 
595 E 8B0AD ST , COIUMBU5 15. OHIO - Adorn* 7243 

November 14, 1952 




Mr. Frank Jones 

WBNS-TV 

495 Olentangy River Road 

Columbus, Ohio 

Dear Mr. Jones: 

I thought you would be interested to know the 
affect of the advertising schedule for our 
client, Pickerington Creamery, on WBNS-TV's 
"Aunt Fran and her Playmates" series. 

The reaction from the trade has been highly 
satisfactory. Pickerington' s powdered milk, 
comparatively unknown before this recent TV 
campaign, has gained distribution in many new 
outlets, and repeat orders for the product are 
high. Your station merchandising department 
outdid itself in preparing the point-of-sale 
material which called attention to our television 
schedule. Despite the fact that a 700 purchase 
is required to secure Aunt Fran's Fingertip 
Puppet premium, including box top and 25£, the 
returns have been most gratifying. 

Very truly yours, 

HARRY M. MILLER,. INC. 



^/John W. Corbett, Jr. I 



/John W. Corbett, Jr. 
Account Executive. 



WBNS-TV, the Nation's Number I 
Test Market Station. 





mbns-tv 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 
CHANNEL 10 



CBS-TV NETWORK • Affiliated with Columbus Dispatch and 

WBNS-AM • Generol Sales Office: 33 North High Street 

REPRESENTED BY BLAIR TV 



Indicative of all 
WBNS-TV's product 
promotion, both Pick- 
erington Creamery's 
product and an 
appealing premium 
were cleverly inte- 
grated into the top- 
rated Aunt Fran show 
. . . resulting in a 
gratifying sales in- 
crease for the client. 



this "unfortunate" because it is 
irrelevant. Copy should be judged 
on its own merit, not on the writ- 
er's. But since this is the case, lean 
heavily, Mr. I.R., on your print 
background in your copy meetings. 
Use a great many print phrases. 
Make with the space-ad allegories 
when you are defending a TV ap- 
proach you have taken. 

Next in this subject of transi- 
tion from print to TV copy and 
second only in importance to do- 
ing actual TV writing is hanging 
around the studios, both film and 
live. You can't get enough of this. 
Better spend some time in a film 
lab, too. Opticals become more 
quickly apparent as to value and 
how-to when you've done this. 

And, if you find it difficult to get 
started on actually needed TV 
copy, work your space stuff into 
TV before anyone asks that you 
do. Get yourself a couple of pads 
of copy paper with oblong frames 
running down the left hand side. 
Start translating your most recent 
space efforts into the new medium. 
But make yourself do the picture 
side first (using stick drawings or 
whatever you're capable of) in- 
cluding all the camera action be- 
fore putting a word in audio. 

Following this effort take out a 
stop watch and act your brain- 
storm. Play the lead in each scene. 
Count the time necessary for 
each transition by actually going 
through the motion with your hand 
whether it's a dissolve or a flip 
wipe or a roll-title. 

Then go over your results with 
a film director or a director of live 
TV. Or both! Let them check your 
timing, suggest simplifications. 

You'll find the whole thing en- 
joyable. More important, in short 
order you'll find the technique, the 
mechanics of the job, become sec- 
ond nature to you at which point 
von will have completed your tran- 
sition to TV copywriter. Then you 
will be reiving on your imagina- 
tion and your knowledge of adver- 
tising psychology . . . and once 
you've arrived here, all you'll have 
to worry about is when they will 
throw color TV at you! 



66 



SPONSOR 



KVOO 

Per Thousand 



That's right ! 

Take a slide rule ... or 

A calculator ... or 

Your pencil. 

Then 

The November Pulse Report for Tulsa 



and 



The 1952 NCS Market Area Figures for KVOO 



Our rate card. 



. and 



Figure any angle you like 



You'll find that 



Per thousand families 



KVOO is by far the 



GREATEST ADVERTISING BUY IN 



OKLAHOMA'S NO. 1 MARKET ! 



RADIO STATION KVOO 






50,000 WATTS 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



N8C AFFILIATE 

EDWARD PETRY AND CO.. INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA. 



67 



liilllllMll ll 




rhoto-on-eloth main's 
realistic backdrop 

Many TV shows are making use of 
a new "photograph-on-cloth" scenic 
backdrop which not only projects 
scenes with three-dimensional quality 
to the TV camera, but helps solve light- 




Philci. scene is one of many in Backdrops library 

ing, storage, and trucking problems. 

Produced by Backdrops, Inc., the 
new drop is actually a photomural, con- 
tact printed directly on a specially pre- 
pared, heavy cloth. It can be made 
from any size photograph or artwork, 
which is blown up to specified size. 

The backdrops can either be made 
to order and bought outright or rented 
from one of the firm's two libraries, 
one in New York, one in Los Angeles. 
Company's executive v.p. is Stephen B. 
Joseph, formerly w ith J. Walter Thomp- 
son and McCann-Erickson. 

Among TV shows using the photo 
backdrops have been: Gulf Playhouse 
I NBC TV) which backgrounded its 
commercials with a drop of a Gulf gas 
station and used scenes such as a \\ est- 
ern prairie and a New England street 
in the show itself. In the commercials 
for General Electric Co. on the Fred 
Waring Show (CBS TV), Backdrops, 
Inc. supplies industrial building and 
factory shots. Comedian Red Buttons 
(CBS TV) used a New York skyline 
view, among others. The news strip, 
Camel News Caravan (NBC TV). Gar- 
ry Moore's variety show (CBS TV), 
and drama programs The Web, Dan- 
ger, and Lux Video Theatre (all CBS 
TV) also utilized the photo backdrop. 

Says Backdrops, Inc. : "It has a three- 



dimensional quality not to be found in 
painted fiats, photo-murals on paper, 
or rear projection. It is completely 
light-absorbent, does not reflect light 
from even the whitest areas, which 
greatly reduces the time needed for 
lighting arrangements. It can be fold- 
ed to a size that anyone can carry un- 
der his arm: thus reduces storage and 
trucking cost to a minimum."' * * * 

TV Guide to he national 
mag, says Triangle 

Triangle Publications, Inc., which 
just purchased TV Guide magazine, 
considers this purchase a natural step, 
according to Walter H. Annenberg, 
Triangle president, since the company 
used to publish Radio Guide (suspend- 
ed in 1943 due to paper shortages). 

Triangle plans to use TV Guide as 
the nucleus of a new national publica- 
tion with regional editions. Says An- 
nenberg: "It will contain not only the 
most complete television listings in 
each area, but also articles, reviews, 
feature stories, a host of photographs, 
and special service features for read- 
ers. It will serve a threefold purpose: 
(1) a day-to-day reference book for 




Roger Clipp, WFIL mgr. (I.) negotiated with 
TV Guide; Lee Wagner (r.) still heads mag 

the TV viewer; (2) an avenue for pro- 
motion of all phases of telecasting; and 
(3) an important new medium for the 
national advertiser." 

Triangle interests include (besides 
Seventeen and Official Detective maga- 
zines) stations WFIL and WFIL-TV, 
Philadelphia, oAvned and operated by 
Triangle's Philadelphia Inquirer. * ** 



KXOK wins praise tvith 
sports promotion 

During both the football and basket- 
ball seasons, sponsors on KXOK, St. 
Louis, bask in the intensified attention 
the station attracts by its popularity 
contests for high school sports stars. 

Just how big a stir the station cre- 
ates with its "Prep-Player-of-the-Week" 
promotion, as it's called, was illus- 
trated during the recent football con- 
test when KXOK was snowed under 
with 114,032 cards, letters, and ballots 




Players were guests on France Laux sports show 

in a single week. This was the tenth 
week of an 11-week football contest 
promotion, which pulled a total of 
214,609 pieces of mail. 

This contest is the only areawide 
selection of outstanding high school 
football — and later basketball — players 
in the St. Louis area. It covers St. 
Louis County schools, as well as near- 
by schools in southern Illinois. Each 
week the students vote via mail to 
KXOK for the "Prep-Player-of-the- 
Week." Each week, two players, one 
from Missouri and one from Illinois, 
receive this title. KXOK Sports Direc- 
tor France Laux airs details of the con- 
test and daily progress reports on 
bis Sports Gallery program, Monday 
through Saturday, 6:00 to 6:15 p.m. 

• * • 

Briefly . . . 

When WJR, Detroit, reviewed its 
1952 operations at a special conference 
on 19 January, John F. Patt. president 
of the station, announced that its 
$3,383,292.55 in sales last year repre- 
sented an increase of $90,479.77 over 
the previous year. Said Patt: "There 
has been a renewed appreciation 
among advertisers of the unsurpassed 
flexibility and universality of radio. 
The increase in WJR revenue is par- 
ticularly significant in that WJR re- 
jected more than $250,000 worth of 
business in 1952 thai did not meet its 
broadcast standards. In the past, radio 
sold itself well, but perhaps not too 



68 



SPONSOR 



wisely. We are more interested in 
high standards than in sales increases." 



Around Christmas 1951, when Edgar 
Bergen and Charlie McCarthy asked 
for gifts for hospitalized veterans in 
their "Operation Santa Claus," their 
CBS Radio drive produced 32,000 
pounds of presents. This past holiday 
season, still on the same radio network. 
Bergen and Charlie succeeded in 
rounding up 45,000 pounds of gifts — 
an increase of 40% over the previous 
year. Edward F. Lethen, CBS director 
of sales extension, points out that in 
this exclusively radio drive, the great 
hulk of the response came from strong 
television cities; in fact, he says, 60% 
came from the top 10 TV cities. A clue 
to why: CBS Radio has found that in 
the 18 top TV cities, nighttime radio 
listening in TV homes has increased 
17% in the last year. The network 
presents details in "Radio in TV-land." 
* * * 

Here are the winners in the Annual 
Retail Radio Contest, cosponsored by 
the BAB and the NRDGA. Awards 
were presented on 13 January at the 
NRDGA Convention at the Hotel Stat- 
ler, N. Y.: 

Programs beamed to a general family 
audience: Large stores — Joske's, KTSA, 
San Antonio, Classics in Jazz; small stores — 
Bigelow's, WJTN, Jamestown, N. Y., Break- 
fast with Bigelow's. 

Programs beamed to a woman's audi- 
ence: Large stores — Sibley. Lindsay & Curr, 
WHAM, Rochester, N. Y., Tower Clock 
Time; Small stores — Linn & Scruggs, WDZ, 
Decatur, 111., Something to Talk About. 

Programs beamed to a teen-age audi- 
ence: Small stores— Yards, WTTM, Trenton, 
N. J., School Scoops. 

Spot saturation campaign: Large stores 
—Joske's, San Antonio. KTSA, KITE. 
KONO. KIWW, KCOR; Small stores— Betty 
Lee, Warren. Pa., WNAE. 

Special award for outstanding use of 
saturation coverage technique: Wolf & 
Dessauer, Fort Wayne, Ind., WOWO, 
WANE, WGL, WKJG. Special award for 
comprehensive use of radio: Rosenbaum 
Brothers, Cumberland, Md., WTBO. Special 
award for outstanding radio coordina- 
tion with other media: Robert Simpson 
Montreal Ltd., Montreal, Canada, CJAD. 



Quick estimates on the cost of al- 
most any type of spot radio campaign 
can be made from the new Spot Radio 
Estimator recently issued by the Sta- 
tion Representatives Association to ad- 
vertisers and agencies. The 24-page 
compilation (1) divides costs in ac- 
cordance with population groups; (2) 
divides costs by population and geog- 
raphy; (3) shows costs in 186 major 
markets. * • • 



1000 WATTS 



woiTs most far reaching station 




Please don't say anything more about 'free deliv- 
ery' "; the man said. 

Community Supermarket has one participating an- 
nouncement on "The Hillbilly John Show" daily — 
over WPAL. 

In an unguarded moment the man said, "Emphasize 
free delivery one time," he said. That's what he 
said! He said it — so he's to blame, not us! 
He calls back the next day: "Don't say anything 
more about free delivery," he says. "Three of my 
delivery boys are threatening to quit now! You're 
runnin' 'em to death!" 

That's what the man said! That's results! 

WPAL works thataway! WPAL sponsors make 
Iotsa sales! 

Independent, personality programming beamed to 

the Coastal Carolina audience! 

It pays off to be different! 

You try WPAL once! You'll see what I mean! 



PAL 



Forjoe and Company 
S. E. Dora-Clayton Agency 



of CHARLESTON 
SOUTH CAROLINA 



All this and Hoopers too! 




ANTED 




"EARLY WORM" JOHNSON 



The "Early Worm" never gets the bird from sponsors who want 
results. Irwin Johnson's "Early Worm" program has top listenership 
throughout the 24-county, Central Ohio area reached by WBNS . . . 
starts the day right for loyal WBNS listeners. They stay with WBNS 
to hear top local and CBS network shows . . . including all the top 
20-rated programs! _ 

ASK JOHN BLAIR 

WINS — 5.000 
WEIOHH— S3.000 
(.01UMIUS. OHIO 

OUTLET 





9 FEBRUARY 1953 



69 



RADIO NET CUT-INS 

(Continued from page 39) 

pattern of coverage, with several dif- 
ferent products being sold simultane- 
ouslv in several different areas. These 
might be "test campaign" cut-ins in a 
single market. (Example: A local TV 
commercial for a new P&G shortening, 
Fluffo, on WBEN-TV, Buffalo, during 
Welcome Travelers.) Just as easily, it 
can be a cut-in P&G commercial which 
reaches audiences in an entire region 
of the U. S. (Example: A sectional 



cut-in on a CBS Radio soaper at Tulsa 
for White Cheer and Blue Cheer, with 
some 11 stations then airing the cut-in 
for the Southwest.) 

Johns-Manville: Sponsor of one of 
radios oldest five-minute network 
shows, Bill Henry and the News (MBS), 
Johns-Manville uses a nationwide se- 
ries of local dealer cut-ins on its night- 
ly newscasts. "Johns-Manville doesn't 
feel their sales message is complete un- 
til the name and address of a J-M deal- 
er or distributor in a community has 



SELL MORE IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 State! 



*rttfK 



* Winston-Salem 
is the home of 
R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Co. 



_s> 



'WJi 



—> 



Recent official Hooper Ratings 
show WSJS, the Journal-Sentinel 
Station, FIRST in the morning — 
FIRST in the afternoon— FIRST in 
the eveningj For the finest in 

AM-FM coverage, it's WSJS 
in Winston-Salem. 

Represented by: HEADLEY-REED CO. 



so\dmS-.C.fe 
sol* m 

w ,lST0N-SM-E« S 



1952 Survey °*V^^^ 



been given. For years, this has been a 
J-M policy," a Mutual executive told 
sponsor, adding, "Printed media at the 
national level just can't provide this 
service — one of the reasons why J-M 
spends most of its budget on the air." 

Gerber Products: Largest factor in 
the growing baby-food boom, Gerber 
is using cut-ins on its segment of NBC 
TV's Kate Smith Shoiv to solve a visual 
marketing problem. Gerber's baby- 
food line is sold in tins, from Chicago 
westward; in the East the same prod- 
ucts are packaged in glass jars. To 
avoid obvious confusion among view- 
ers, Gerbers uses two sets of film com- 
mercials, one featuring the tins, and 
the other the glass containers. "Tin" 
commercials are cut in at Chicago, and 
feed TV areas in the West and Mid- 
west. "Glass" commercials are in the 
original show out of New York. Costs 
of the films, plus the switching charges 
in Chicago ( around $50 more per pro- 
gram ) , are Gerber's only extras. 

Cannon Mills: Another air client with 
regional marketing problems, Cannon 
has worked out a cut-in system on its 
Saturday-morning Give and Take show 
on CBS Radio to help plug local sales, 
seasonal specials, and store names. 
About 25 or 30 stations make a 30- 
second cut-in toward the end of the 
show ( on New York's cue ) to add this 
local-level "sell" to the main Cannon 
messages. Result: Housewives in each 
of these areas know just where to go 
to buy the Cannon sheets, towels, and 
other items they have heard adver- 
tised elsewhere in the show. 

J. R. Wood: This famous jewelry 
house, makers of Artcarved rings, was 
until recently a non-user of broadcast 
advertising, prefeiing to put ad dol- 
lars into newspapers and magazines. A 
pitch in which MBS pointed out that 
Wood could have 30-second dealer 
identifications cut locally into a net- 
work show at no extra charge, changed 
all that. Now, Wood is sponsoring a 
weekly quarter-hour program of ro- 
mantic songs, with Lanny Ross, on 
Mutual, and is tying the name of re- 
tailer outlets to its commercials in the 
show. The J. R. Wood operation is 
especiall) interesting since it reflects 
the fact that networks now use cut-in 
operations as extra inducements when 
approaching clients. 

That's a brief run-down on some of 
the current cut-in users. There are, of 



70 



SPONSOR- 




A radio relay fower in process of construction 



OPENI NG 



NEW FRONTIERS FOR 

TELEVISION 



Cable plow train laying coaxial cable in difficulf territory 




In one era of history the prairie 
schooner made the roads to new 
frontiers. Now it's radio relay and 
coaxial cable thai cross our moun- 
tains and plains to develop new- 
territories for television. 

Intercity television transmission 
is not very far in time from its 
pioneering days. Yet its progress 
has been great. In 1!)4(> less than 
.500 channel miles of intercity 
television network facilities ex- 
isted. By the end of 1952 this had 
grown to 31,500 channel miles . . . 
enough to reach an audience of 
about 92,000.000 people. 

These are big figures. But they 
can't tell the whole story of the 
big job being done. Behind them 
are many special projects, each 
costly in time and money. 

Yet the cost of the service, 
furnished by the Long Lines De- 
partment of the American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company 
and the Bell Telephone Com- 
panies, is low. Bell System charges, 
for the use of its intercity televi- 
sion facilities, average about ten 
cents a mile for a half hour of 
program time. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM [& 

Providing transmission channels for intercity radio and television today and tomorrow 

9 FEBRUARY 1953 



71 



course, man) others. Generally, they 
duplicate some form of the above plans. 
So recent has the upswing in cut-in 
business been that the major radio and 
video webs have few formal presenta- 
tions, rate cards, or official plans to 
pitch at interested advertisers and agen- 
cies. The whole process is still on a 
very informal basis. Usually, an ad- 
vertiser with a marketing problem com- 
parable to those above makes the first 
move by approaching the network. 
W ith network officials, he then works 
out the details and costs of a cut-in 



operation — if it seems that cut-ins will 
serve a useful function. 

However, there are some basic simi- 
larities — as well as some interesting 
differences — between the methods used 
by the leading radio and TV webs to 
handle cut-ins. Also, many agencies 
have varying views of the value of cut- 
ins, sponsor herewith passes on some 
of its key findings: 

Are cut-ins useful? Not every adver- 
tiser on the air has need for cut-ins. A 
cigarette brand sold nationally, for in- 




A K II M A 



KIT- 



Most everyone knows Atlanta as the 
home of "Coke." To the time buyer, it's 
that, and more. To him it's an important 
Southern market and one of the nation's 
top sixty. But after Altanta, and the oth- 
ers, comes the choice of productive sec- 
ondary markets. 

We suggest, "after Atlanta, comes Yak- 
ima." While many a good secondary 
market is adequately covered by key city 
media, such is not the case with. the 200 
million dollar Yakima package. Here is 
a virtually isolated trading center in the 
heart of Washington State's atomic and 
electrical power industry and one of the 
country's leading agricultural regions. 
All of which makes it an increasingly 
valuable secondary market of first im- 
portance. 

YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 



B C 



ABC 



KYAK 



MBS 



N II Ml A 



CBS 



THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



GEORGE W. CLARK 



WEED AND COMPANY 



stance, usually has no regional prod- 
uct problems, and has too many deal- 
ers to make cut-ins worthwhile. How- 
ever, if the same tobacco firm were to 
bring out a new cigarette brand, and 
introduce it in a series of regional ex- 
pansions, network cut-ins would team 
well with other regional and local-level 
advertising such as spot radio and TV, 
newspapers, billboards. Cost-per-cut-in 
could range from $2 to $90 locally in 
radio and TV. Sectional cut-ins would 
run from $15 up. 

Sponsors with a small group of deal- 
ers in almost any community (autos, 
appliances, auto parts, insurance com- 
panies, building materials) and public 
utility groups ( like the cut-in-using 
Electric Companies of America) may 
find cut-ins useful. In this case, the 
value of the cut-in lies less in the ability 
of a network show to sell different 
products in different parts of the U. S. 
Rather, the cut-ins can be a 30-second- 
or-less dealer identification. 

Incidentally, these dealer breakaways 
are generally done without extra cost 
in radio, and at very nominal facilities 
costs by TV stations. 

Several agencymen suggested this 
useful yardstick for advertisers to use 
in judging whether or not network 
radio-TV plus a dealer cut-in could be 
of value. Advertisers who now use, or 
could use, the Western Union "Opera- 
tor 25" gimmick in their print media 
or air advertising may find that cut-ins 
can serve the same purpose. 

(Note: the WU service mentioned 
here is a familiar advertising tool. You 
read an ad that has an "Operator 25" 
credit line at the bottom. Then, you 
phone her; she names the local dealer. 
It is, in effect, a print media attempt 
to duplicate the "localizing" possible 
with network air advertising.) 

Costs: Accurate figures on cut-in costs 
are easy to obtain from networks — if 
you call them with a specific proposal. 
However, it's hard to pull together a 
series of "average costs," the networks 
insist, since no two sponsors seem to 
be doing exactly the same thing when 
it comes to cut-in deals. 

However, here are some pertinent 
facts about cut-in costs uncovered by 
sponsor editors: 

'• "Station cut-in charges are based 
on what a station actually does for 
you," is how a sales service executive 
of ABC Radio explained the basic ele- 
ment of cut-in costs. In other words, 



72 



SPONSOR 



the advertiser who wants a "sectional" 
cut-in pays the service charges of the 
station that inserts the sectional com- 
mercial. Since the other stations re- 
ceiving the sectional insert down the 
line have nothing to do but sit and 
listen to it, there are no further charges. 
A series of special local inserts, where 
no network lines can relay a cut-in, 
costs the sum of local station charges, 
on the other hand. 

2. Talent charges are made for ra- 
dio and TV cut-ins in the dozen or so 
cities where radio and TV talent union 
shops have contracts covering "talent 
fees." Even so, they're not high. In 
radio, they run as low as $2 and don t 
often run more than $15 at the station 
level. These apply only to stations 
actually doing a cut-in, not stations 
receiving a prior cut-in as part of a 
network show being fed. Thirty-second 
dealer identifications are usually given 
gratis to network clients. In TV, rates 
are higher, but even in New York — 
where the talent gets top scale — they 
don't add much more than $25 or $30 
on top of the facilities charges. 

3. Extra line charges can occur if 
an advertiser wants something extra- 
fancy in the way of cut-ins. Then, a 
network or station must order extra 
lines from AT&T, and often these can 
be sizable "double track" networks to 
feed different groups of stations two 
different sets of commercials from a 
feeding point. Such costs vary all 
over the lot. Essentially, they are 
charged for on the basis of frequency 
of use, amount of lines involved, and 
the amount of AT&T switching that is 
required. 

4. Extra commercial costs are near- 
ly always involved in cut-ins. Most 
radio cut-ins (exception: dealer iden- 
tifications) are made from transcrip- 
tions prepared by the client's ad agen- 
cy, which involve the costs of talent, 
music, recording, shipping, as in spot 
campaigns. TV cut-ins, such as those 
of P&G, Gerber, Borden's Instant Cof- 
fee, Continental Baking, and others, are 
usually done from film commercials — 
particularly if they are regional cut- 
ins. Again, these costs can vary wide- 
ly, but are comparable to the costs of 
preparing spot announcements. Inci- 
dentally, many of the radio and TV cut- 
ins used today are actually spot record- 
ings or films doing double duty, where 
the show's commercial lengths can be 
adjusted to such standard time slots as 
one-minute or 30-seconds. 



Network policies: Although all of 
the major radio and TV webs air shows 
on which there are commercial cut-ins 
of one sort or another, management 
policies vary somewhat from one net- 
work to the next. 

ABC and Mutual, for example, wel- 
come the concept of radio cut-ins with 
open arms, and even use them occa- 
sionally in sales pitches to prospective 
clients. Mutual, particularly, promotes 
their use, since the MBS network line- 
up (some big, many small stations) 



makes it easy for advertisers to pin- 
point a particular market or bounded 
sales area with cut-ins. 

NBC and CBS Radio are less prone 
to urge cut-in operations. NBC con- 
trols its cut-ins, handling the planning, 
copy and film routing, billing, and 
other problems. CBS does not, han- 
dling only the authorizations and plan- 
ning, and letting the agency, stations, 
and reps handle the business details. 

The TV webs of ABC, NBC, and 
CBS have cut-in policies which are a 



WDAY 



(FARGO, N. D.) 

IS ONE OF THE NATION'S 
MOST POPULAR STATIONS! 



Despite local competition from three other 
major networks, WDAY consistently gets 
a greater share of Audience — Morning, 
Afternoon and Evening — than all other 
stations combined, in Fargo-Moorhead! 
•\ 

NBC • 5000 WATTS 
970 KILOCYCLES 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 

Exclusive National 

Representatives 




9 FEBRUARY 1953 



73 



direct reflection of their radio networks 
as outlined above. DuMont, generalK. 
has a cut-in policy like that of ABC TV. 

Future plans: With the use of cut-ins 
definitely on the increase, there are 
now some network plans afoot to put 
cut-ins on a more organized basis. 

Some networks feel that cut-ins can 
be put up in packages, or at least re- 
duced to a series of sample maps and 
rate cards in order for agencies and 
clients to realize the potentials of the 
cut-in method. Already, as in the case 
of ABC and Mutual radio nets, busi- 
ness pitches are being made which in- 
volve cut-ins. Such clients as J. R. 
Wood. Philco, General Mills, Gillette, 
Johnson's Wax, Deepfreeze Products, 
and others have signed for network 
shows largely due to cut-in plans. 

Cut-ins can be combined with the 
"package announcement"' plans so that 
different areas of the country can re- 
ceive different commercials from the 
same sponsor. Thus, in the future, cut- 
ins are likely to become a growing fac- 
tor in such short-term or long-term 
operations as Pyramid Plan and Multi- 
Message Plan, and in network TV par- 
ticipation programs like Kate Smith 
Shoiv and Show of Shows. * * * 



PURINA MERCHANDISING 

(Continued from page 36) 

convinced by seeing what a product 
will do than by verbal sales points. 

2. As for the 1951 promotion con- 
test, the company extracted two things 
of value from it. It learned that radio 
stations could turn up a remarkable 
and useful variety of promotional 
ideas. And it learned four basic les- 
sons about radio promotion and mer- 
chandising: 

a. Effective promotion does not have 
to be elaborate or costly. 

b. A radio station does not need a 
large promotion and merchandising 
staff to do a good job. 

c. A good promotion campaign does 
not have to be tricky, clever, or full of 
gimmicks to catch attention. 

d. The best promotion and merchan- 
dising for the farm audience is simple, 
sincere, and consistent. 

3. The final factor that determined 
the nature and extent of the '52 contest 
was this: The Chow Department adver- 
tising manager. Maury Malin, took 
$30,000 out of Purina's magazine bud- 
get in 1951 and gave it to Brown Bros, 
for a radio campaign on Dog Chow in 
the South. One of the features of the 




- ■ :v.":-; : :W 

■ ■ jgk 



James M. LeGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Co. 

74 




In Miami, the first week of 
the New Year was a 
humdinger! All airlines, 
railroads and bus lines 
reported all records 
broken by the number of 
sun and fun seekers who 
flocked to our balmy 
shores. 

A significant trend? It 
sure is! We're looking 
forward to the biggest, 
longest season in our 
history. It's a significant 
trend, too, that WIOD is 
the radio station chosen 
more and more by our 
local advertisers. Just ask 
your Hollingbery man to 
show you why. 



campaign w-as a pet dog parade. The 
youngsters bringing dogs to the store 
competed for prizes for the dog with 
the longest tail, the dog with the most 
spots, etc. It went over big. Purina 
got more dog parades in '51 than dur- 
ing the previous three years put to- 
gether. It showed Purina the possi- 
bilities of having stations, dealers, and 
Purina salesmen working together. 

Both the agency and the company 
realized that the new intensive promo- 
tion plan had to be presented in the 
right way. S. W. "Bill" Brow r n of the 
agency made trips through the South 
and West, sounding out stations and 
crystalizing his ideas. 

Browns impression was that s'.ations 
felt the need for stronger promotion 
and merchandising but. '"didn't know 
where to start . . . how far to go . . . 
and when to shut it off." 

Hoir vmnpttnii pushetl contest: To 

steer stations in the right direction and 
boost enthusiasm for the new contest, 
Purina invited about 600 stations car- 
rying programs for the company or 
dealers to a series of regional meetings. 
They were held in Seattle, San Fran- 
cisco, Denver, Omaha. Chicago, Fort 
Worth, Memphis, Nashville, Charlotte, 
and Pittsburgh. A company-agency 
task force did the contest selling job. 
It consisted of G. M. Philpott, Purina 
vice president in charge of advertising 
Malin, and Brown. 

The stations were reminded first that 
sales opportunities were vast and that 
Purina was able and anxious to take 
advantage of them. The population in- 
crease in the U. S. was running at the 
rate of 200,000 a month and that meant 
200,000 more mouths to feed, pros- 
perity for the farmer. 

The task force pointed out that Pu- 
rina was growing faster than the indus- 
try. Chow plants were up from 20 to 
34 in 10 years. The same decade also 
saw r an increase in chow tonnage from 
1,055,000 to 3,700,000 while, at the 
same time, company sales figures 
jumped from $61,578,000 to $375,- 
000,000. The immediate target was 
five million tons, more than Purina 
sold during the first 46 years of its 
history in the feed business. 

Some of the problems of Purina's 
salesmen were laid before the stations. 
It was pointed out that the station 
could help the salesman find good deal- 
ers; that the salesman in addition to 
his regular selling chores, must also 

SPONSOR 



help the dealer in promoting traffic and 
reaching more farmers; that the sales- 
men, as a result, were very busy men 
and could use station help. 

Then Purina nailed down its point: 
Purina believes in advertising. It uses 
many media, but spends most on radio. 
It is examining television but for the 
\ears immediately ahead believes that 
radio will continue to be the better of 
the two for reaching the farmer. 

As proof of its faith in radio, the 
task force pointed to Purina's past use 
of radio, its increasing radio budget 
during the past 10 years, and its cur- 
rent media allocations. The 1952 ad 
budget was underscored dramatically 
by large cardboard checks held up in 
front of the audience. The checks 
paid a total of $2,740,000 to the vari- 
ous media, with radio getting $1,450,- 
000 — more than all the others com- 
bined. The others were farm maga- 
zines, $900,000: small-town newspa- 
pers, $250,000; minute movies, $58,- 
000; billboards, $47,000; direct mail, 
$35,000. 

Then Purina unveiled the details of 
its contest. Purina offered a prize to 
the dealer in each sales division who 
does the best job of promoting, mer- 
chandising, and selling with special live 
demonstrations between 1 August and 
1 December. The prize: a free seat and 
transportation for himself and his wife 
to a New Year's bowl game. In addi- 
tion, the radio station backing up the 
winning dealer would also win two 
bowl game trips. 

The stations were assured that the 
contest was not a plea for free time. 
But they were pointedly reminded that 
"activity on your part will keep your 
Purina dealer and salesman sold. And 
when they are sold on a station, the 
station usually stays on the schedule."' 



How company hitched contest: 

The Purina-Brown promotion team 
didn't let the subject of the contest drop 
once it had gotten its ideas off its chest. 
It realized it could get even more out 
of the stations by sparking enthusiasm 
and channeling promotion efforts. For 
this job, it drew generously from its 
experience in the '51 contest. 

Stations were urged to invite sales- 
men and dealers to meetings ( there was 
an excellent response to this) . The im- 
portance of keeping after dealers was 
stressed to stations. It was particularly 
important that as many dealers as pos- 
sible set up the "Mike and Ike" and 
"Lay and Pay" demonstrations. To 
push dealers into action and get reports 
from the demonstrations, Purina pro- 
vided the stations with double post- 
cards to be mailed. 

Stations were urged to make tape re- 
cordings in which the live demonstra- 
tions were discussed at the stores. 
Since "proof" advertising is one of 
Purina's best sales themes, the stations 
were also urged to make tape inter- 
views with satisfied Purina feeders. In 
some areas, Purina bought additional 
time where the stations were doing an 
outstanding job of promoting the live 
demonstrations. During the contest 
period, Purina sent regular bulletins 
to the stations talking up the contest. 
The company also provided samples of 
newspaper promotion from which, if 
the station wished, it could copy and 
fill in with the appropriate names and 
statistics of Purina feeders. 

Contest results: Out of the scores of 
entries, Purina judges picked the fol- 
lowing stations as winners. They are 
listed along with examples of what they 
did to come out in front of the mike: 
WPLH, Huntington, W. Va.: Vis- 



ited winning store, taped interviews 
with poultry and hog raisers on three 
specific occasions: ill beginning of 
the live demonstrations, (2) half-time 
weighing, and I .'5 1 wind-up party. 

KDRS, Paragould, Ark.: Taking its 
"Roving Mike," station taped inter- 
views with owners of hens and pigs 
used in the live demonstrations and 
with other poultiv and livestock feed- 
ers. Interviews also taped with dealer, 
employees, and customers at "kick-off" 
and half-time weighing parties. Regu- 
lar progress reports. After "Mike" was 
sold, station reminded listeners to 
watch "Ike" grow on Purina Hog 
Chow from then on. 

W'ERR, Fayetteville, Tenn.: Broad- 
cast a total of 18 taped interviews, 
varying in length from five to 30 min- 
utes. Tape recordings and movies were 
made at the beginning of the demon- 
strations. 

WFLO, Farmville, Va.: Station got 
elephant from circus to carry sign pro- 
moting "Mike and Ike" in the parade 
and later in the big top. Station helped 
dealer conduct weight judging contest 
on two pigs every Saturday. Person 
judging nearest correct weight received 
100-pound bag of Purina Chow. Taped 
interviews with winners were broad- 
cast the following week. 

MKHI. Rock Hill, S. C: Conducted 
a "trial" in which "Ike" brought suit 
against the dealer charging him with 
cruel and inhuman treatment because 
he was denied Purina Hog Chow. The 
"trial" was broadcast direct from the 
corridor of the County Courthouse and 
created a lot of comment among sta- 
tion's listeners. The dealer, of course, 
was found guilty and sentenced to a 
life of telling farmers the value of prop- 
er nutrition for hogs. During the con- 
test period, the store sold nearly 1,000 




This is WHDH's John Day! 

Outstanding News Editor, Analyst, Announcer 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



75 



Independent 

Retail Grocers 

in Baltimore say: 

WFBR's 

the station for us ! 



Every year since 1936, the 
powerful Independent Retail 
Grocers Association of Balti- 
more has turned to Baltimore's 
promotion -minded, know- 
how station, WFBR, to make 
sure their Annual Food Show, 
held at the Fifth Regiment 
Armory in Baltimore, goes 
over with a bang. 

Every year WFBR has thrown 
the full weight of its promotion, 
programming, merchandising 
and production departments 
behind this great food event. 

The result? Every year, bigger 
crowds, more exhibitors, better 
displays— and firmer loyalties, 
friendship and cooperation be- 
tween the 2765 members of the 
Independent Retail Grocers 
Association and WFBR. 

For real showmanship, solid 
merchandising and active, 
day-in, day-out promotion, ask 
your John Blair man or write, 
wire or phone . . . 




more bags of laying rations and near- 
ly 350 more bags of hog rations than 
during the corresponding period of 
1952. 

WKRT, Cortland, N. Y.: Station 
helped dealer tie-in with a 4-H Club 
Achievement Night where "Mike and 
Ike" were featured in a prize-fight 
ring. Taped interviews were made 
there as well as at the store and farms 
in the area. Regular "Mike and Ike" 
progress reports. 

KVOO, Tulsa, Okla.: Station had a 
large number of dealers (23) in its 
coverage area and faced problem of 
giving adequate promotional support 
to all. Taped interviews were made at 
many stores and used regularly along 
with progress reports. 

KTKE, Lufkin, Tex. : Made total of 
45 tape interviews. A microphone at 
"Lay and Pay" booth was set up dur- 
ing Texas Fall Festival and broadcasts 
made direct from booth. Recorded pig 
squeals used as introduction for weight 
reports broadcast regularly. 

KFTM, Ft. Morgan, Colo.: Station 
put 126 egg reports and 133 weight re- 
ports on air. Ballyhoo of wind-up party 
attracted 350 people, each of whom 
paid $1 and braved snow and sub-zero 
cold to attend. Hog give-away cere- 
monies broadcast. 

l\l Itr. Fresno, Cal.: Also faced 
problem of promoting large number of 
dealers. Paul Nelson, station farm di- 
rector, interviewed dealers and 15 of 
these interviews were aired as commer- 
cials on regular Purina program. Also, 
six interviews taped with owners of 
hogs and hens. 

KNBC, San Francisco, Cal.: Sta- 
tion plugged new Purina dealers, taped 
interviews with them, made 280 re- 
ports on 20 dealers' demonstrations. 
Winning dealer's "Lay and Pay" con- 
test got an early start by being placed 
in the Placer County Fair during early 
part of August. Proceeds of "Mike 
and Ike" give-away went to Roseville 
Hospital Association. 

WFRX, West Frankfort, 111.: Used 
taped interviews and progress reports 
five days a week. Comity Farm Agents, 
4-H advisors, others appeared for live 
interviews. Telephone interviews also 
used. Store owner brought "Mike and 
Ike" to 15 group meetings on hogs. 

WFBIM, Indianapolis, Ind. : Cam- 
paign received double-barreled promo- 
lion through radio and TV. Harry 
Martin, farm director of WFBM and 
WFBM-TV, encouraged dealers to send 



in reports and reported on several 
dealers during each broadcast. Win- 
ning dealer recorded 200-bag sales in- 
crease during October. 



Mason City, Iowa: Dealer 
separate program for the 
a six-day 15-minute show 
Reported: "This program 



KRIB, 

bought a 
campaign, 
at noon. 

was almost as good a salesman as our 
live demonstrations." Station helped 
dealer attract sizable crowd to wind- 
up party at which dealer sold $4,936 
worth of Purina Chows and booked 62 
additional tons for future delivery. 

JVKOW, Madison, Wis.: Ray Street- 
er of station news staff made daily 
telephone calls to dealers in six-county 
area to get progress reports on live 
demonstrations. Followed up with 
taped interviews with dealers and feed- 
ers. Travelled over 3,000 miles pro- 
moting campaign. 

KFEQ, St. Joseph, Mo.: Broadcast 
reports from several dealers on a rotat- 
ing basis. Made 133 progress reports. 
H. J. Schmitz of station traveled 1.300 
miles making tape interviews. Win- 
ning dealer sent out 1,700 mailings, 
used weekly column in local newspaper 
for reports. Station circulated advance 
news on time of interviews. 



What's 



Countrypnlitan? 



SEE 



PAGE 



53 



76 



SPONSOR 



KHKC, Pendleton, Ore.: Station 
got an early start, recording interviews 
with owners of "Lay and Pay" hens 
before demonstration was set up in 
winning dealer's store. 

KDSH, Boise, Idaho: High point of 
campaign was first anniversary of win- 
ning dealer's store opening. Day also 
marked end of "Lay and Pay" contest, 
"Mike and Ike's" half-time party and 
award of two runt pigs dealer had been 
raising. Station made tapes all day. 

Special awards: Four special awards 
were given to stations: 

WiWT, Cedar Rapids, Iowa: For an 
excellent job done by a station with a 
large coverage area. Farm Service Di- 
rector Chuck Worcester made tape in- 
terviews with dealers, attended several 
half-time and award parties to get more 
tapes and led crowds to a "Mike's Vic- 
tory Celebration." Worcester started 
a "Mike" on his own farm and chal- 
lenged all dealers in his coverage area 
to get their "Mikes" to beat his "Mike." 

WLAC, Nashville, Tenn. : For an ex- 
cellent job done by a station with a 
large coverage area. Stars from sta- 
tion's Saturday Frolic appeared at win- 
ning dealer's half-time weighing party 
for a three-and-a-half hour broadcast. 

KLRA, Little Rock, Ark.: For espe- 
cially good tape recordings. Spot an- 
nouncements were used prior to start 
of demonstrations. Interviews with 
"special" feeders aired. Entire "Mike 
and Ike" give-away party was taped. 

WilfCT, Memphis, Tenn.: For TV 
coverage. Station telecast interviews 
with dealers, films of demonstrations, 
progress reports, "Mike and Ike" leav- 
ing for slaughter house and a "Mike 
and Ike"' give-away party. 

WVOP, Vidalia, Ga.: No details 
given on this station. * • * 



WILLYS-OVERLAND 

(Continued from page 31) 

dation productions sight unseen. Hind- 
sight shows it wasn't much of a gamble 
for the latest available Nielsen rating, 
covering 14 and 21 December tele- 
casts, is 27.2. 

The Nielsen figure is one showing 
the number of homes viewing the pro- 
gram for six minutes or more. The 
homes figure is 3,866,000, which means 
that possibly 10,000,000 viewers tuned 
in to the show and should do some- 
thing to spike theories that entertain- 
ment must be aimed at the 12-year-old 
mentality level to be successful. And. 
not so incidentally, the rating topped 
for the first time all competing TV 
shows, including the previous leader 
on ABC, Super Circus, as well as 
NBC's Zoo Parade. 

Omnibus is the great white hope 
of the intellectuals, so far as TV goes. 
It minimizes the advertisers' control, 
although the literary and art crowd 
are undoubtedly happy about the fact 
that there are five Omnibus spon- 
sors and that this will permit the Ford 
Foundation to spend most of the $2 
million it was betting on Omnibus on 
other things. It will cost each sponsor 
$700,000 for 26 weeks of Omnibus. 

3. On 20 January, Willys-Overland 
sponsored the radio and TV coverage 
of President Eisenhower's inauguration 
on ABC. It cost about $110,000. As 
sponsor, the firm was traveling in dis- 
tinguished company, an association 
Willys-Overland hoped wouldn't be 
missed by the public at large — or pros- 
pective dealers, either, for that matter. 
This distinguished company included 
General Motors, which paid for NBC 
coverage, and Packard, which bought 
CBS. 



Ewell & Thurber pulled off some- 
thing of a coup in buying the inaugura- 
tion, for, in addition, it bought every 
local TV and radio spot for its dealers. 
Thus the firm was able to get continu- 
ous and complete ad penetration. This 
maneuver may have had something to 
do with the fact that Ewell & Thurber's 
new vice president in charge of its 
New York office, Steve Mudge, is a 
veteran in the spot sales field. The 
company itself had not been buying 
any radio or TV spots, leaving that job 
to the dealers as a matter of policy. 

4. Carrying out the strategy im- 
plicit in its sponsorship of the inaugu- 
ration, Willys-Overland has allocated 
$225,000 for CBS's radio and TV cov- 
erage of the coronation of Queen Eliza- 
beth II this coming June. The asso- 
ciation of the Aero-Willys with the 
pomp and circumstance, the ancient 
traditions and the st;;tcl\ mood of the 
coronation is further grist for the 
firm's ad mill. 

5. Though not part of its prestige 
and culture approach, Willys-Overland 
is now on NBC's early-morning video 
show, Today. The firm bought five 
minutes a day for two weeks to push 
its 1953 models. The campaign started 
26 January. 

UilJifN" commercials: Willys-Over- 
land realizes that while prestige can 
make a car attractive, consumers want 
the facts about a car, too. In its air 
commercials, the agency gets down to 
earth and cites these facts. 

Right now the commercials are bear- 
ing down hard on price. The new 
year shapes up as one of the most com- 
petitive since World War II. And the 
Aero-Willys is in the toughest battle in 
the auto business. 

[Please turn to page 79) 




This is WHDH's Curt Gowdy! 

The Voice of the Boston Red Sox — Top Sports Personality 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald-Traveler Corp. 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



77 



1 Xew and upcoming TV stations 


(Continued f 


rom page 


58) 












J 


C9y and state 

1 


Market 
rank 


Call letters 
& channel 


On-alr date" 


Power (kw) 


Net affll. 


No. TV 
stns on 
air now 


No. sets In 
mkt now" 


Licensee-owner 


Manager 


Sales rep 


Visual 


A 


ural 


Texas (cont'd) 

Wichita Falls 


161 KFDX-TV( 3] 

KTVW(22 
KWFT( 6] 


1 Apr. '53 

May '53 
nk 


60 
18.5 

22.5 


36 

9.3 

11.5 





12,000 


Wichtex Radio &. TV Con 
(KFDX) 

White TV Co. 
Wichita Falls TV Co. 


Howard Fry 


Virginia 

Danville 


WBTM-TV(24) 


Oct. '53 


225 


120 





Over 40,000 
in "B" area 


Plee'mort Bdestg. Corp. 
(WBTM) 


Edward G. Gard- Hollingbery 
ner 


Lynchburg 


177 WLVA-TV(I3 
WWOD-TV(l6 


8 Feb. '53 
nk 


28 
100 


14 
57 


CBS, DuM 


35,000 


Lyn-hbetrg Bdestg. Corp. Philip P. Allen Hollingbery 
(WLVA) 

Old Dominion Bdestg. Corp. William T. How- 
(WWOD) ard Jr. 


Roanohe 


130 WROV-TV(27 

wsl:-tv(io 


15 Feb. '53 
1 1 Dec. '52 


105 
250 


62 
125 


ABC 1 
NBC, CBS 


39,800 


Radio Roanoke (WROV) 

Shenandoah Life Stns 
(WSLS) 


Frank E. Koehlee Burn-Smltb 
James Moore Avery- Knodel 


Washington 

' Bellingham 


KVOS-TV(l2] 


nk 


16 


3 







KVOS. Inc. 




i 

I Spokane 


87 KHQ-TV( 6] 
KXLY-TV( 4 


8 Dec. '52 
1 Feb. '53 


100 
48 


55 
28.5 


NBC. ABC 2 
CBS, DuM 


14,535 


KHQ. Inc. 

Syrrro-s Bdestg. Co. 
(KXLY) 


R. O. Dunning Katz 

Norman Hawkins Wa'ker (E.); P* 
N.W. Bdestrs.O 


1 Taeoma 

| 


70 KMO-TV(l3] 
KTNT-TV(II 


June '53 
nk 


115 
29.5 


58 
15 





214,000 


KMO, Inc. Jerry Geehan Branham 

Tribune Publ. Co. (KTNT) Leonard H. Hig- Weed 
gins 


i 

Yakima 


K!MA-TV(29] 
KIT-TV(23] 


July '53 
Fall '53 


55 
22 


27.5 

1 1 







Cas-ade Bdestg. Co. 
(KIMA) 

KIT. Inc. 


1 
R. Lee Black Weed 

■ 


Wisconsin 

Green Bay 


162 WBAY-TV( 2 


Mar. '53 


100 


50 







Ncrbertine Fathers 
(WBAY) 


Weed 


Madison 


105 WKOW-TV(27 
nk(33 


July '53 
nk 


85 
17.8 


42.5 
10.7 







Mono-a Bdestg. Co. 
(WKOW) 

Bartell TV Corp. 


Headley-Reed 


JVeenah 


WNAM-TV(42 


Fall '53 


15.5 


8.3 





25,000 


Ncenah-eM"nasha Bdestg. 
Co. (WNAM) 


Don C. Wlrtb Clark 


Oshkosh 


WOSH-TV(48 


Apr. '53 


1.31 


.7 





5,000 


Oshkosh Bdestg. Co. 
(WOSH) 


Wm. F. Johns Jr. 


Wyoming 

Cheyenne 


KFBC-TV( 5 


nk 


5.2 


2.65 




Frontier Bdestg. Co. 
(KFBC) 




Hawaii 

Honolulu 


KGMB-TV( 9 
KONA(ll 


1 Dec. '52 
22 Nov. '52 


35 
125 


17.5 


CBS, NBC, 2 
ABC 

DuM 


12,383 


Hawai'an Bdestg. System 
(KGMB, KHBC) 

Radio Honolulu, Ltd. 


C. Richard Evans Free &. Peters 
Geo. H. Bowles Forjoe 


Puerto Rico 

San Juan 


WKAQ-TV( 2 


End of '53 


100 


50 






El Mundo Bdestg. Corp. 


Inter-Amerlcaa 


nk Not known 
* Most prospective start it 
•* The numbor of TV sets 
t Rankings bo marked inc 
to designated and the mai 
Aihland; Holyoke, Mass.: 
BUnk spaces Indicate in 

78 


E dates bave beer obtained from the actual grantees, others from trade sources. Many must be deemed only approximations. 

designate.! in each tnaekoi an- necessarily approximate. In most rites with stations already on the air, N"BC TV Research figures arc used; all others are estimates from various sources. 

tate that the cits H ell Is actually only part of a market which has this tank (markets are classified according to Metropolitan Area population as defined by Sales Management). Citli 
ket city-group Ere here listed: New Britain, fjonn Hartford New Bi tain; Waterbury, Conn.: New Haven Waterbury; St. Petersburg, Fla.: Tampa-St. Petersburg; Ashland, Ky. : Huntuigta 

Id-Hol ... New Bedford. Mass.: Tall Kiwr-New Bedford; Bethlehem ,v Kasion. l'a. : Alentown-Bethlehem-Easton; Hazleton. Pa.: Wllkcs-Barre-Hazleton. 
ormation eenavallahle at press time. 

SPONSOR 

• 



The Aero-Willys is competing against 
the leading seller, Chevrolet, which has 
also reduced its prices, and Ford, 
which is battling mightily to overtake 
the Chewy. 

Here are some recent commercials on 
the price theme: 

After summing up the features of the 
Aero-Willys, a radio pitch continues: 
"They told us we couldn't turn out a 
car like this at a price competitive with 
ordinary cars. But we did. The 1953 
Aero Lark two-door sedan actually lists 
at $1,499.50 F.O.B. Toledo, plus only 
taxes and other usual charges. This 
makes it one of the lowest-priced six- 
passenger cars in the world." 

Another radio commercial says: 
"Now you will be glad to know that 
our various models — the Aero Lark, 
the Aero Falcon, and the Aero Ace — 
all come in both two-door and four- 
door models. And I think you will be 
interested in this — the new 1953 four- 
door models actually sell for less than 
the comparable two-door models did 
last year." 

And another: "During the past 
month, the big news in the automobile 
business has been the sensational price 
reduction in the Aero-Willys. Going 
contrary to postwar trend, Willys-Over- 
land actually reduced automobile 
prices. . . . These price reductions were 
made possible because increased Gov- 
ernment allocations and a constantly 
increasing volume of sales, now enable 
us to more than double our produc- 
tion." 

One of the basic ad themes, and un- 
derstandably so, has been the idea that 
the firm which built the famous jeep 
knows how to make cars. The Aero- 
Willys, commercials say over and over 
again, "combines the ruggedness of 
the jeep with the comfort and luxury of 



an airliner." The Aero-Willys "is made 
by people who know how to build 
ruggedness into an automobile— for 
where in the world can you go and not 
find the reputation of the might) 
jeep?" Tied in with this is a frequent 
reminder that Willys-Overland spent 10 
years and $10 million in perfecting il- 
new car, drawing on its experience 
with the jeep. 

The commercials also punch home 
the following features: (1) the fact 
that the Aero-Willys is one of the few 
passenger cars with a unit frame and 
body. (2) the fact that the driver can 
see all four fenders. I 3 ) a low center of 
gravity which minimizes roll and sway 
when the car goes around corners, and 
(4) economy in gas mileage. 

In both print and air copy, Willys- 
Overland is currently making hay out 
of an auto magazine article in the Feb- 
ruary issue of Motor Trend magazine, 
which ranks all the American-made 
passenger cars according to perform- 
ance, handling, safety, economy, and 
maintenance. The Aero-Willys was sec- 
end only to Cadillac. 

In a shrewd copy twist, Willys-Over- 
land took its "hat off to Cadillac" and 
slated that the Aero- Willys "is proud 
to stand next to the "Standard of the 
World." The association of the Aero 
Willys with the upper-class Cadillac is 
an extension of its prestige programing 
and is further evidence of the basic 
thinking going on at Willys-Overland 
and Ewell & Thurber. 

Willys past and future: In bucking 
the established auto industry, Willys- 
Overland has cut a whale of a job out 
for itself. The auto landscape is strewn 
with the graves of independents who 
attempted to carve out places for them- 
selves with cars both good and bad 



but who failed for a variety of reasons. 

Not that Willys-Overland is small 
potatoes in the auto business. It has 
had 50 years of experience under its 
belt, bavin- nianui.i Iiim,| mhIi model- 
as the Willys-Overland, the Willys- 
Knight, and the \\ hippet. Furthermore, 
the firm is now fifth in the auto busi- 
ness in terms of over-all production 
and is third among auto exporters. 

In addition to its long experience, it 
has had more than a peek into the 
inside workings of the Big Three. After 
its reorganization in the '30s, Willys- 
Overland fought its way to solvency 
with a succession of presidents lured 
away from its top competitors. There 
was Joseph Frazer, a Chrysler sales 
executive; then Charles Sorensen from 
Ford, and then James Mooncv from 
General Motors, who brought with him 
to Willys-Overland his extensive knowl- 
edge of GM's export business. 

Its present chief is Ward Canaday, 
who is now both president and chair- 
man of the board. He has been hold- 
ing both positions since Mooney left 
in 1949. Canaday is, significantly, an 
advertising man, although he has been 
linked with Willys-Overland's destiny 
for a good part of his business life and 
that certainly qualifies him as an auto 
man, too. In addition to his current 
reign, Canaday has filled in as chief 
executive during the interregnum be- 
tween the succession of presidents 
since the reorganization. It would 
not be too much to say that the re- 
cent history of Willy-Overland is the 
history of the stewardship of Canaday. 

Canaday 's new plunge into the pas- 
senger car business constitutes, among 
other things, a conviction that a light 
12,500 pounds) car that can run eco- 
nomically will have more appeal than 
the heavier, and. hence, more power- 




This is WHDH's Bob Clayton! 

Famous for his Nationally Known "Boston Ballroom 1 



One of the outstanding WHDH 
personalities who is selling your 
products to Eastern New England's 
Market of over 1,500,000 Radio 
Families. 



Subsidiary of the Boston Herald -Traveler Corp. 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



WHDH 

50,000 WATTS 
BOSTON 

See Your John Blair Man 

79 



fully motored, low-price jobs put out 
by the Big Three. By this strategy, 
Willys-Overland removes itself, for the 
time being, at least, from the horse- 
power race, which nobody admits to, 
but which is evident even to the con- 
sumer's naked eye. At the same time, 
\\ illys-Overland is hedging with a 90 
horsepower (its basic motor is 75 hp.) 



F-head engine, the only one of its type 
being built for American passenger 
cars. Finally, Canaday is also betting 
that Americans will go for a car that 
is stylish without sporting a toothy, 
chromium grille. The Aero- Willys will 
probably get for itself a nice chunk 
of the 5,000,000 cars expected to be 
sold this year. • • • 




Your Pre-publication Offer 

22 TELEVISION TALKS 

transcribed from the 

BMI TV CLINICS 




An important book covering 
many vital phases of TV 
'"know-how," from 
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use to operations. 

Offered to TV, radio 
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The twenty-two subjects embrace all 
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television. 

In addition, a good portion of its more 
than 250 pages is devoted to condensed 
transcripts of the Question and 
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Includes Chapters by 

BENNETT LARSEN-WPIX, New York 
ROBERT D. SWEZEY-WDSU-TV, New Orleans 
CHARLES F. HOLDEN-ABC-TV, New York 
RODGER CLIPP-ABC-TV, Philadelphia 
TED COTT-WNBT, New York 
A. DONOVAN FAUST-WDTV, Pittsburgh 
JOEL CHASEMAN-WAAM, Baltimore 
PHILIP G. LASKY-KPIX, San Francisco 
PAUL ADANTI-WHEN, Syracuse 
RALPH BURGIN-WNBW, Washington 
A. A. SCHECTER-NBC-TV, New York 
GEORGE HEINEMANN-WNBQ-TV-NBC 
BRUCE WALLACE-WTMJ, Milwaukee 
WALTER PREST0N-WBKB, Chicago 
JAY FARAGHAN-WGN-TV, Chicago 
HAROLD LUND-WDTV, Pittsburgh 
WALT EMERSON-WENR-TV, Chicago 
KLAUS LANSBERG-KTLA, Hollywood 
ROBERT PURCELL-KTTV, Hollywood 
GEORGE M0SC0VICS-KNXT, Hollywood 
DONN TATUM-ABC-TV, Hollywood 
JOE COFFIN KLAC-TV, Hollywood 
Foreword by 

PAULA. WALKER, FCC Chairman 
Luncheon talk 

by GOVERNOR EARL WARREN 
of California 



other TV operations. 

To make sure you receive your copy of "Twenty-Two Television Talks 
immediately after publication, place your order now. 



Broadcast Music Inc. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 




RADIO BILLINGS 

{Continued from page 33) 

dio's Pyramid, NBC's Tandem, MBS's 
Multi-Message, and CBS's Power. Op- 
erating more on an insertion basis than 
on the long-term contracts of the 
1940's, they have attracted many non- 
broadcast-users plus many advertising 
clients who are regular users of spot 
radio. As sponsor went to press, CBS 
was putting the final touches on yet 
another of the participation deals, 
called Checkerboard Plan. In this plan, 
rotating advertisers will skip around 
between three network shows on a full- 
sponsorship basis on any one night. 

2. Pricing changes: Although many 
a station has cried a vehement "foul!" 
(particularly radio outlets in non-TV 
or new TV markets) radio networks 
since 1948 have faced the practical fact 
that their average ratings and audi- 
ences have dropped off at night. Rea- 
son: the influx of television. Proof: 
A. C. Nielsen figures, which show the 
average nighttime rating in late No- 
vember 1949 to be 9.8 and in late No- 
vember 1952 to be 5.4. In terms of 
homes (due to growth of U.S. radio 
homes, the drop is less abrupt in ac- 
tuality I that's about 3,849,000 homes 
in 1949 vs. 2,368,000 for the 1952 pe- 
riod. Daytime is off much less — but it 
is off. Result: Last season, NBC and 
CBS cut their radio rates, with the 
nighttime cuts being about 20%. MBS 
and ABC, while leaving the rate cards 
alone, juggled the discount structures 
so that advertisers get about the same 
reduction. 

Latest move in this area is being 
made currently by Mutual. The net has 
just worked out a discount deal where- 
by nighttime network advertisers will 
get 50% off the rates in areas where 
Mutual net stations compete with TV. 

3. Added features: In addition to 
the new sales formulas and lower 
prices, many other network innovations 
or gimmicks have boosted advertisers 
interest in radio. Three of the major 
radio networks are engaged, in varying 
degrees, in merchandising plans, which 
tie the network advertising messages 
to point-of-purehase. All of the big 
radio webs are accepting more exten- 
sive cut-in arrangements, more region- 
al-only network shows, and are selling 
junior-sized networks to advertisers 
with special marketing problems. The 
plans don't end here. Every network 
has a series of new tricks up its sleeve, 



80 



SPONSOR 



1953 EDITION 



114 Case Histories 



Wlore than ratings, more than popularity polls, more than 
coverage analyses — actual advertising results put the finger on the 
true value of an advertising medium. 

Radio is great because radio proves out great. Over 100 examples 
(114 to be exact) of radio's greatness in moving people to buy 
are contained in the 1953 Edition of radio results. All appeared 
during 1952 in the bi-weekly issues of sponsor. Each is arranged 
by category, boiled down to the essence. Included are up-to-date 
national, regional, and local case histories — examples for every 
prospect you might hope to get in 1953. 

Station salesmen and reps have reported scores of sales resulting 
directly from previous radio results. This year your prospects 
need radio results more than ever, and your station can benefit 
by tying-in with a positive ad message in this unique, long-life, use book. 

'The coupon below will reserve double-truck, full-page, or 
half-page for you. Advertising is limited to 50 pages. Final advertising 
forms close 2 March. Publication is scheduled for 23 March release. 



SPONSOR SERVICES IRC. 510 Madison Ave., N. Y. C. 22 

°lease reserve space indicated below. I will expect copy 
:all from you in sufficient time to prepare my message. 



double-truck @ $780 
full-page @ $390 

halt-page @ $220 



(one-insertion rate) 
(one-insertion rate) 
(one-insertion rate) 



frequency 

discounts 

apply 




State 



Final advertising forms close 2 March 



foch RADIO RESULTS 
advertiser will 
receive 25 copies 
of the 1953 Edition 



Published by 




PARTIAL CATEGORIES 















Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent audience rating 
leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y./// 
3,000 WATTS V \ 

Reprtuntativtf ... 
EVERITT-McKINNfr, Inc., N.w York, Chi 
ICE t. O'CONNEU CO.. let AngeUt. San Fran. 



^outh KJeoraia C 



W 

G 
O 

\m la 



e ue 



it 



f 



Covered line a WJlanKet 

5,000 WATTS • VALDOSTA, GA. 

A "Dee" Rivers Station 
Call Forjoc or Stars, Inc., Atlanta 



including new rate combinations of ra- 
dio and video, special merchandising 
and promotion plans, and more exten- 
sive radio research. 

4. Program improvements: Con- 
trary to some expectations, radio net- 
works have not gone along a program 
path which would result in WNEW-like 
music-and-news network programs. Ex- 
ecutives of the four major webs told 
sponsor that radio networks have the 
best chance of holding audiences and 
clients if they continue to maintain the 
same old relative balance between such 
basic program types as drama, music, 
news, sports, comedy, forum panels, 
r.nd the like. 

"What we're actually doing is re- 
pricing and revising the radio network 
formulas of the 1940's," Charles "Bud" 
Barry, NBC v. p., told SPONSOR in a 
comment typical of network attitude. 
"It's true we have more capsule shows 
and programs designed to be part of a 
participating sales operation, but we're 
concentrating on squeezing all the wa- 
ter we can out of network radio pro- 
gram costs, not merely bowing to TV." 

Many backstage innovations have 
been used to chop costs in network ra- 
dio, however. Eddie Cantor, for ex- 
ample, is heard on NBC Radio in a 
low-cost disk jockey show, instead of 
being surrounded with a huge live va- 
riety cast. Tape recorders make possi- 
ble everything from lowered rehearsal 
time to a new bag of tricks in radio 
sound effects. Stars used to having 
their own way — and their own price — 
have learned to get in step with the 
changing economy. New personalities, 
from Martin & Lewis to Robert Q. Lew- 
is, are being given big build-ups in net- 
work radio. 

5. Bigger networks: One of the big 

alterations in the network radio picture 
is due to a post-1948 influx of new ra- 
dio stations. Some 400 outlets have 
gone on the air, the majority network. 
This situation prevails particularly 
at ABC and Mutual. The average net- 
work line-up for ABC advertisers in 
1948 was around 183 stations; today 
the figure stands at 244. Mutual's jump 
is even higher. In 1948, the average 
Mutual sponsored network line-up was 
254 outlets; today the figure is around 
400. Since the percentages represented 
by these increases are higher than the 
percentage of total growth of each net- 
works, the answer is obvious: Sponsors 
are interested in network radio. * * * 




CLEVELAND'S 
STATION 





5,000 WATTS— 850 K.C. 

BASIC ABC NETWORK 

REPRESENTED 

BY 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES 




Pity the 
poor film 
that is 



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82 



SPONSOR 



NEW TV MARKETS 

(Continued from page 37) 

Here is a sampling of comment on 
the slowdown question, with descrip- 
tive intimation of the sources: 

Ad matutger for a drug firm: 

"The time had to come when we would 
stop to evaluate TV market needs and 
values, to see where we're going and, 
before we go ahead, to map out some 
idea of where we want to go. When 
budgets for time facilities go awry, as 
they have with us, it's imperative that 
you go back and find out what is es- 
sential and what is surplus. We've 
stopped adding new secondary markets 
until our agencies can prepare a dia- 
gram upon which we can intelligently 
base our future selection of markets." 

Timebuyer for agency in the $25 
million class: "Several of our im- 
portant accounts are working on next 
year's budget. This has given us an 
opportunity to pause and reappraise 
the coverage pattern as a whole and 
decide what our recommended policy 
will be toward markets that have dupli- 
cate coverage and stations in non- 
duplicated markets that have worth- 



KBTV 



/Transmitting Denver's 
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Atop Lookout Mountain 



c £ s fKBTVll 

ABC CHANNEL 1 

Affiliate 9 \ 

• L DENVER , J | 

To reach the rich, expanding 
Denver and Colorado market, specify 
KBTV ... for sales results! Check these 
facts and figures. Write for complete 
details on this productive, fast-grow- 
ing market. 

THE GREAT 
COLORADO MARKET 

Population 1,325,089 

°/o Increase over 1940 18.0 

Total Retail Sales SI, 257,095, 000 

Total Urban Population 831,318 

Total Rural Population 493 771 

TV Sets in Are* 117,299 

(Rocky Mtn. Elec. League — Jan. 1) 



KBTV 

CHANNEL Q DENVER 

1100 CALIFORNIA • TAbor 6386 

Contact Your Nearest 
Free & Peters Representative 



while circulation. The economics of 
duplicated coverage presented an ex- 
tremely different problem in TV as 
compared to radio: The margin of 
price is anywhere from 50 to 300' . . 

Head timebuyer for one of the 

big JO: "The advertiser can't go on 
doing a piecemeal buying job. For in- 
stance, our soap account is waiting for 
us to complete an over-all analysis on 
the relative franchise value of various 
markets and the degree of actual or 
potential coverage duplication in sec- 
ondary markets before resolving its 
1953-54 policy on network buying. We 
can't continue to go to our clients with 
loosely contrived data on what mar- 
kets to add. We must from here on in 
base our recommendations on concrete 
information, even if it is necessary that 
our research department develop its 
own 'BMB.' 

"This may sound too harsh, but 
many of the newer TV stations have 
been deploringly remiss in furnishing 
us with the kind of data from which we 
could form an intelligent recommenda- 
tion for our clients." 

Media director for major agency 
heavy in cigarette and soap busi- 
ness: "We're taking a close look be- 
fore adding any more stations in any 
type of market because we find that in 
the rush to add markets as they be- 
came available we overlooked cardinal 
fundamentals in media buying. The 
important questions of market cover- 
age should be answered now. 

"We can't afford to slip into the bad 
habit of steering a client into a market 
only to discover many months later 
that he shouldn't have gone into that 
market in the first place. The selection 
of a TV market, networkwise, should 
be in terms of a franchise: Is the mar- 
ket important enough, in light of fam- 
ily-set and sales-potential projections, 
for the advertiser to make an invest- 
ment? There's probably nothing as 
uneconomic in media buying as hop- 
ping in and out of a market." 

Network station relations offi- 
cial: "The super-cautious attitude tliat 
our sales department is beginning to 
encounter from buyers doesn't exactly 
surprise me. Agencies have been pick- 
ing up stations like crazy since the end 
of the freeze. Hence we have expected 
that sooner or later advertisers treat 
the question of duplicate coverage more 
diligently. In anticipation of a sudden 



NATIONAL 

ADVERTISERS 

ACCLAIM 

KFVD's 
5,000,000 — plus 

COVERAGE 

at the most 
reasonable comparative 

RATES 




KWJJ Brings You 
a 1 1/2 Billion Dollar 

MARKET 

The KWJJ market is booming! Lat- 
est figures show that population in 
the KWJJ listening area has in- 
creased to 1,287,700 and annual 
retail sales figures have risen to I '/2 
billion dollars. Spot your sales mes- 
sage to this growing area, on the 
station that is beamed to local in- 
terests and local demands. 




KWJJ 

Studios and Offices 

1011 S.W. 6th Ave. 

PORTLAND 
OREGON 

Nat'l Reps. — WEED & COMPANY 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



83 



check on the reins on the buying 
front, we have made it a policy to avoid 
affiliating ourselves with stations that 
present, or will in time present, a too 
flagrant problem of overlapping. How- 
ever, we feel confident that there are 
quite a number of secondary markets 
which are covered from outside — take 
Hartford, Conn., as a case in point — 
that advertisers will readily include on 
their network lists. ' 

Station rep: "This business of sell- 
ing stations in secondary markets al- 



ready getting service from outside has 
become a headache of headaches: es- 
pecially if the newcomer has UHF. We 
have one of those problem stations in 
our office right now. Like many oth- 
ers, this station operator can't under- 
stand why network advertisers aren't 
rushing in to buy his station. We tell 
him that the agencies have become 
hesitant about adding markets that are 
already serviced from outside and that 
they're demanding specific data about 
set conversion if the station is UHF. 
But it's like talking to a man who 




WSAZ-TV 

Covers the rich 
(and growing) 

OHIO VALLEY 

EXCLUSIVELY! 



WSAZ-TV, with HOMETOWN PROGRAMING 
(Huntington-Charleston) is viewed in this area of 
3,000,000 EXCLUSIVELY— Plant expansion at 
South Point, Ohio $12,000,000 and Government 
Building Program outside of Portsmouth, Ohio in the 
Millions . . . WSAZ-TV covers 103 counties in West 
Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia . . . 

________ 






: — , .. i — - — __-_ 



MARKET DATA: 1951-52 (Total Area)* 

POPULATION: 3,299,300 

FAMILIES: 812,000 

FOOD SALES: $479,404,000 

DRUG SALES: $ 48,506,000 

RETAIL SALES: $1,828,557,000 

EFFECTIVE 

BUYING INCOME: $2,873,118,000 

Source: Sales Management — "Survey of Buying Power" — May 10, 1952 

84,000 WATTS— CHANNEL 3 



Affiliated with all four Television Networks 



WSAZ-TV 



HUNTINGTON, W. VIRGINIA 
represented by the KAT2 AGENCY 



dreamt about a bonanza and wakened 
to find it wasn't there." 

sponsor's poll of views on the feasi- 
bility of adopting a formula for TV 
market buying at this stage of the 
medium's development brought to light 
the fact that many top bracket agencies 
were working hard at the project. ( An 
amalgam of key ideas for such a for- 
mula, as collected by sponsor in the 
course of the survey, is contained in 
the check list on page 37.) However, 
a goodlv number of those queried 
thought that the coverage situation was 
not yet such as to make any formula 
dependable or worthy of serious ap- 
plication. 

Following is a cross-section of opin- 
ion on the formula question : 

Research director for an agency 
among biggest net TV users: "The 
idea that you must wait until a medi- 
um has reached a very high point of 
market coverage before trying to re- 
duce buying methodology to certain 
principles is absurd. The time to do 
your charting of market evaluation is 
before the problem of where to put 
your money gets out of hand. We're 
constantly learning new things about 
the varied complexions of TV markets. 
Today we think we have enough infor- 
mation at hand to evolve a practical 
formula for picking markets. Of course, 
the formula will have to be modified 
from time to time, but the basic prin- 
ciples can be set up right now." 

Timebuyer for an agency active 
in TV via automotive, paper 
products, food accounts: "Buying 
according to a formula would make life 
very easy but the chances are that a 
buyer of TV markets will have to go 
on using more of training and feel for 
the task than rule-of-thumb. You can 
draw up a check list for your guid- 
ance, but the buyer should resist any 
tendency to let the check list become a 
hard and fast formula. After all, every 
market should be treated as a separate 
problem and each market should be de- 
cided on its own merits." 

.Id manager for a tttbacco com- 
pany: "Television has become the 
dynamo of advertising media. Every 
advertiser and every product, practical- 
ly, has a different approach in market 
or media selection but that shouldn't 
prevent the adoption of a basic for- 
mula for assessing market values. 
What's the difference if in projecting 



84 



SPONSOR 




RESULTS are better than ratings 



In 1952 TV Results was a constant source of inspiration and 
service to advertisers, agencies, and stations who wanted to know 
hoiv TV worked, how to make it sell best, how to reduce TV costs, 
how it was being used in varied fields. 

The 1953 Edition of TV Results, with its 107 practical 
case histories, is the answer to a big need right now. Culled and 
condensed from the recent pages of sponsor, these examples of TV 
advertising on national, regional, and local levels will interest the 
station sponsor and prospect, whoever he may be. 

Your advertising message in the 1953 TV Results will pinpoint 
your station as a resultful medium that appreciates the importance 
of the cash-register payoff on advertising. Advertisers and 
agencies will appreciate your point of view — increasingly they 
comprehend and appreciate results far more than ratings. 

Final advertising deadline is 2 March. We can accept only 
40 pages of advertising in this issue. Use coupon below to guarantee 
your participation. 










SPONSOR SERVICES Inc. sio Mad iS o„ A Ve ., N . y. c. 22 

°lease reserve space indicated below. I will expect copy 
-all from you in sufficient time to prepare my message. 



P double-truck 
T] full-page @ 
halt-page @ 



$780 (one-insertion rate) 
$390 (one-insertion rate) 
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frequency 

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Final advertising forms elose 2 March 



Each TV RESULTS 
advertiser will 
receive 25 copies 
of the 1 9 S3 Edition 





your data you find later on that you 
were slightly olT: at least your calcu- 
lation- keep you from going astray." 

Network station relations offi- 
cio!: '"The puzzles are going to mount 
faster than ever in the next year or 
two. Nobody knows what TV is worth 
in any great concentration of popula- 
tion. Until certain fundamentals of 
evaluation have been established in 
TV, it might be a good idea to keep 
away the slide-rule boys." • * • 



MEN, MONEY 

{Continued from page 10) 

who now operate by rule and rote and 
accumulated precedent ( and Excess 
Profit Taxation ! ) could have gone 
over the trial and error bumps the way 
Dous did. 



Not the least fantastic facet of Coul- 
ter's duties as a radio pioneer was this: 
He was thrust into social contact with 
many of the great and highest-paid of 
his time. Your 1953 agency vice pres- 




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Our rates are local and include 
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We serve 400,000 loyal listen- 
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Only the Gary Sales Plan sells 
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Call us without obligation. 

Gen. Mgr.-WWCA 



WWCA 



Gary Indiana's 
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m Chicago'. 
Pf Radio 
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ident buying TV packages from outside 
producers or networks is exposed very 
little to the blandishments, the hokum 
of stars. It took a lot of savoir-faire to 
stand up to the ruthless realities of a 
show business, organized on a much 
more personalized basis than today. 
Oldtimers recall one jolt that the essen- 
tially guileless Coulter got on a visit 
to Hollywood when a comedian, he 
thought his buddy-chum, maneuvered 
him into the middle in a quarrel with 
another comedian. It was a grim strug- 
gle for laugh lines and friendship had 
nothing to do with it. Coulter came 
back to New York a trifle disenchanted. 

Probably the first regular whodunit 
series, the Eno Crime Club, was Coul- 
ter-produced. His Everready Hour, 
Camel Pleasure Hour, and other pro- 
grams provided the frame for debut 
after debut. Eddie Cantor, Maurice 
Chevalier. Will Rogers, the Mills 
Brothers, Ben Bernie, Belle Baker, Joe 
Cook, Weber & Fields, Fred Waring, 
Jascha Heifetz were all Coulter radio 
"firsts." He had the then-stupendous 
George Olsen-Ethel Shutta pair on the 
air and as an added starter threw in a 
promising monologist from B. F. 
Keiths Palace, by name Jack Benny. 
The sponsor: Canada Dry. 

* * * 

During the 1940's and 1950's Doug 
Coulter was a high-salaried radio/TV 
man at CBS, then at Foote, Cone & 
Belding. and latterly at NBC. It is only 
part of the pioneer saga to reveal that 
in 1936 when he left N. W. Ayer, after 
what now seems, in the telling, a long 
record of high-powered creativity, his 
starting salary as second in command 
of programs at CBS was $11,000. That 
figure may serve to provide the per- 
spective of time. Compare what Coul- 
ter accomplished with the records of 
some present-day agency veeps and 
compare the salaries. 

* * * 

Yes, the story of Douglas Coulter is 
a little sad, very fascinating, more than 
a little educational. Doug wept on his 
own time so we only have the external 
evidence of what the pace, the frustra- 
tions, the ego-drive, the two-faced tal- 
ent, and all the rest did to his insides. 
Knowing the kind of situations he had 
to deal with, and some of the people, 
as nice a tribute as any paid him in 
the days after his sudden death was 
this: "Doug didn't know how to be a 
hypocrite." * * * 



86 



SPONSOR 



A message to advertisers 
and agency executives 



► ►►Will you help 

SPONSOR 

evaluate all 
ad media? 



t^ / filled out SPONSOR'S media questionnaire. 




The results will be a great help to advertisers, 




1 especially with respect to media evaluation. ^ 


ELLIOTT PLOWE, Advertising Manager 
Peter Paul, Inc. 





Turn page for ad media evaluation questionnaire 



►►► 



SPONSOR'S AD MEDIA EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE 



Dear ADVERTISER and AGENCY EXECUTIVE: 

How do you buy advertising? 
What determines your choice? 
How do you check results? 

What are the facts about each of the important 

media? 

These are only a few of the facts behind media 
selection which SPONSOR is seeking to uncover in 
an exhaustive media evaluation study. 

One of our approaches is this pre-tested question- 
naire. Wont you please fill it out as best you can 
and return it to us as soon as possible? It will wind 
up an extensive project that has included months of 
personal interviews, analysis of hundreds of media 
reports, comparison and accumulation of much 
statistical data and many case histories. 

This project has taken SPONSOR to the adver- 
tising centers of the United States and Canada in 
order to make it representative of all areas and 
insure that it will be the most intensive study of 
media evaluation that has yet been undertaken. 

An impartial board of the nation s outstanding 
advertising authorities will validate the findings. 
Included are agency presidents, leading advertisers, 
the country's top researchers — all selected for their 
wide range of advertising media activity. 

Your answers will be kept entirely confidential. 
So feel free to be frank and thorough. The result 
will be a more intelligent, a more penetrating study. 
And in return we'll see tliat you get a copy of it 
just as soon as published. 

Additional comments are welcome. Our deadline 
is Monday, 23 February. So please return the 
questionnaire today! 

Ray Lap.ca, Special Projects Editor, SPONSOR 



What was YOUR background before you got into advertising? 

( ) Newspaper ( ) Radio ( ) Other 

( ) Magazine ( ) Television 

< ) Check here if you want a copy of this survey. 

Name: Title: 

Company: 

Address: 

City, Zone, State 

Please mail to Ray Lapica, Special Projects Editor, SPONSOR 
510 Madison Ave., New York 22 



i. Who determines what medium or combination of media to be used in> 

I 



a campaignf 

AT THE CLIENT 

Board of Directors 

President 

Sales Manager 

Advertising Mgr. 

Regional or District Sales Mgr. 

Sales Staff 

Other: 



2. What influences the choice of medium or combination of media tor 
campaign? (Please number in order of importance — it equally impor- 



AT THE AGENCY 

) Plans Board 

) President 

) Account Executive 

) Media Director 

) Research Director 

) Other: 



tant, give same number.) 

Goals of campaign. 

Type and cost of product. 

Who buys and how best to reach. 

Market and how best to reach. 

Amount of appropriation. 

Type of copy used. 

Experience with medium. 

Cost of medium per thousand. 

Time & Space salesmen's talks. 



) Experience stories in trade press 

in specific medium. 
) Prestige of medium. 
) Merchandising and program or 

editorial promotion by medium. 
) Recommendations of dealers. 

wholesalers, branch offices, brok 

ers.etc. 
I Other: 



3. What do you want to know about a medium before deciding on a 
campaign? (Check each answer that applies.) 



( ) How well does it cover the mar- 
ket? 
( ) Does it reach the buyers of my 

product? 
( ) How expensive is it? 
( ) How does it rate in a particular 

market against other media? 
( ) Any research available? Or where 

do I get my facts about the 

medium? 
{ ) Which of my competitors is using 

it now? 

How much? 



) If my product is new, has this par- 
ticular medium ever been used to 
sell a similar product? 

) What is the medium's prestige or 
quality? 

) Will I need other media to com- 
plete the coverage? 

) Can I saturate the market quickly? 

) What merchandising or product 
cooperation will I get from the 
medium? 

) Other: 



4. What sources give you the most media data? (Please rate in order of 
importance in your work.) 



Past experience with medium. 
Time or space reps. 
Direct mail promotion. 
Trade press. 
SPONSOR (magazine). 
Agency media department. 
ABC statements. 
SRDS 



( ) Media Records and PIB data. 
( ) BMB or other coverage reports. 
( ) Audience measurement services 

(ratings). 
( ) Starch readership studies. 
( ) Advertising Research Foundation i 

readership studies. 
( ) Other: 



5. Which of the following research and measurement services do you use? 

RADIO 4 TV COST 

) Nielsen 

) Hooper 

) American Research Bureau 

) Pulse 

) Videodex 

) Trendex 

) Conlan 



) Advertest 

) Standard Audit & Measurement Services_ 

) Other- 



Which of the following research and measurement services do you use? 

PRINT MEDIA COST 

I Starch Readership Studies 



75. Give one reason why in answer to — 14: 



Advertising Foundation 
Readership Studies 



I Impact Studies of 
Gallup & Robinson 



Readex 
Other: 



<§! What's wrong with the information sources available to you in your 
work? 



I 






Which of the following media do you customarily think of FIRST in 
connection with a campaign? (Give same number if equally important.) 



) Magazines 

) Newspapers 

I ) Radio 

(') TV 



( ) Outdoor 
( ) Transit 

( ) Business (trade) pa- 
pers 
( ) Weekly papers 
) Direct Mail 



I Which have you used during past year? 



Magazines 

Newspapers 

Radio 

TV 



( ) Outdoor 
( ) Transit 

( ) Business (trade) pa- 
pers 
( ) Weekly papers 
) Direct Mail 



( ) Sunday Supplements 

( ) Comics 

( ) Foreign language 

press 
( ) Export pubs. 
( ) Other: 



) Sunday Supplements 

) Comics 

) Foreign language 

press 
) Export pubs. 
) Other: 



What percentage of your advertising budget or billings went into each? 



) Magazines 
) Newspapers 
j) Radio 
TV 



( ) Outdoor 
( ) Transit 

( ) Business (trade) pa- 
pers 
( ) Weekly papers 
( ) Direct Mail 



( ) Sunday Supplements 

( ) Comics 

( ) Foreign language 

press 
( ) Export pubs. 
( ) Other: 



Has TV affected your media use pattern? ( ) Yes ( ) No 
If so, how? (Explain briefly.) 



How do you test media effectiveness? 

) Test markets ( ) Sales results 

) Rating services ( ) Using different me- 

) Coupons dium in different 

cities 



Otht 



7 6. How do you determine cost per thousand (readers, listeners, ad noters, 

etc.)? 



For newspapers: 
For magazines: 
For radio: 



For TV: 
Other: 



17. Have you ever established a correlation between sales and advertising 
medium or media used? 



( ) YES 
18. It yes, what? 
I. 



NO 



( ) IN PART 



**************** 

FOLLOWING DATA (Strictly Confidential) WILL ENABLE US 
TO GIVE YOU A TABULATION OF THE DOLLAR SIZE 
OF THE SAMPLE WE ARE USING FOR THIS STUDY 



7. (Advertiser) What was your ad budget in 

7951? 7952? 

(as follows): 



for newspapers 
_ for magazines 

for radio 

for TV 
other 



Your capitalization: $ 



2. (Agency) What were your total billings in 

795 7? _ 7952? (est.) 

(as follows) : 

in newspapers 

in magazines 

in radio 

in TV 

other 



**************** 



. If you used different media in different cities (newspaper in one town, 
radio station in second, TV in third), what was result? 



I. (for advertiser) What category of products do you sell? 



I. What medium or combination have you found most effective in selling 
your products? 



) Newspapers 

) Magazines 

) Radio 

) Television 

) Outdoor 



( ) Direct Mail 
( ) Business (trade) pa- 
pers 
( ) Transit 
( ) Weekly papers 
( ) Export pubs. 



( ) Sunday Supplements 

( ) Comics 

( ) Foreign language 

press 
Other: 






SPONSOR 

the magazine radio 
and TV advertisers use 

510 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 22 



CBS 



IN THE LAND 



GREEN BAY 



5,000 WATTS 



Radio Station 



KFMB 



IS 

now 



CBS 



RADIO NETWORK 



in 



San Diego, Calif. 
(550 on Dial) 



John A. Kennedy, Board Chairman 

Howard L. Chernoff, Cen. Manager 

Represented by THE BRANHAM CO. 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued from page 63) 

sources. Now the audience grimly 
points out that just "any old thing" 
will not do. So TV has developed new 
faces, new voices, new techniques. 

TV will spawn and rear its own. It 
will produce new cameramen, actors, 
designers, ballet people, etc. 

Where is the TV talent of the future 
to come from? Look beside you — it's 
that offspring in the chair — watching. 

Read H. Wight 

V.P. in Charge of Radio & TV 

J. M. Mathes 

New York 



I believe that tele- 
vision can help 
develop new tal- 
ent by more pro- 
grams that fea- 
ture a different 
cast each week, 
such as our Hoi- 
lyivood Screen 
Test program that 
is now in its fifth 
year. We use at 
least two new performers each week, 
and have introduced 350 new faces. 

There are many fine young actors 
and actresses who do not get a chance 
because many directors and producers 
will not take a gamble on a newcomer. 
Outstanding young actors and ac- 
tresses, such as Patricia Crowley, 
Dickinson Eastham, Paul Crabtree, 
and Muriel Rahn, are among those who 
made their television debuts. 

The speed with which television uses 
up its old talent, to say nothing of the 
wear and tear on these performers, 
makes it a necessity for the industry 
to gamble on new faces if it's going to 
remain the leading medium. 

Lester Lewis 

President 

Lester Lewis Assoc. 

New York 




ABC-UPT MERCER 

{Continued from page 29) 

at the New York Paramount include: 
Frank Sinatra, Danny Kaye, Red Skel- 
ton, the Andrews Sisters, and many 
others. It's a fair guess that AB-PT 
will not be afraid to invest heavily in 
new talent, based on this experience. 



AFFILIATES 



CJ. What steps will the newly merged 
company take to inform affiliates of 
new policy and prospects? 
A. In addition to eventual meetings, 
regionally, with the affiliates, it is prob- 
able that one or more executives of the 
network will travel the country for in- 
formal discussions It's known that AB- 
PT is anxious to arouse the maximum 
in enthusiasm among affiliates. 

Q. What steps will the company take 
to add new affiliates to the network to 
increase its coverage? 
A. Programing developments as out- 
lined above will play the major role 
in getting new stations. It's hoped that 
with increased audience and stronger 
shows there will be a natural interest 
on the part of stations in the new ABC. 
This applies both to radio and TV sta- 
tions now affiliated with other networks 
and new television stations coming on 
the air. 

Stations desire affiliation with a net- 
work for two reasons. ( 1 ) To get pro- 
graming which produces major audi- 
ences and (2) to get their share of the 
revenue from such programs when they 
are sponsored. The merged network 
hopes to have more of both to offer 
prospective affiliates. 

In addition it is possible that the 
network will seek to attract affiliates 
with contracts which provide for com- 
pensation at a higher rate than their 
existing contracts with other networks. 
ABC has in the past been known to 




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stop- motion, full animation and TV slides! 
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FILMACK STUDIOS 1328 SOUTH WABASH AVE., CHICAGO 



90 



SPONSOR 



offer such contracts. 

At one time ABC offered a power- 
house station a contract providing for 
a guarantee that its income with ABC 
would be the same for the next two 
years as it had been for the two-year 
period prior with another network. 
Since the offer came at a time when 
radio revenues were declining under 
tbe impact of television, ABC was in 
effect offering the station an increase 
over its expected income. The offer 
was, however, declined. 

Robert Kintner cited this instance 
before the FCC in explaining that of- 
fers of revenue alone are not enough 
to attract strong affiliates. The station 
in question wanted to insure audience 
as well as income to protect its national 
spot, its local business, and its future 
earning power. This serves to under- 
line the importance for the network of 
building programing. 

To understand fully how important- 
ly affiliates figure in the AB-PT picture, 
consider these figures for ownership of 
clear-channel stations in radio: CBS 
has 5.45; NBC has 5; Mutual, 2; ABC 
1.5. 

In television, on the other hand, ABC 
is advantageously situated as far as its 
nucleus of owned and operated stations 
are concerned. It has stations in five 
big markets which give it a greater 
population coverage among O&O's than 
any other net. But as far as TV affili- 
ates are concerned, ABC has thus far 
suffered in competition. When radio 
stations enter TV, they frequently stick 
with their former radio affiliation. Or 
they go where the best programs are. 

AB-PT hopes by programing im- 
provement to attract the best TV affili- 
ates, possibly thereby bringing some 
prime radio stations along as well. It 
hopes to get its fair share of VHF sta- 
tions from among those yet to be grant- 
ed. But it is by no means down on 
UHF. (It will buy two more stations 




DOTHAN, ALABAMA 



5000/560 



NON-01 RECTION AL 



•a* t ten tentative I Southed! 

Wan »*■ Aytr I Dora-Cla»!»n Afmcy 



operating in the UHF band if the FCC 
goes along with plans to allow owner- 
ship of two 1'llF Matrons in addition 
to five VHF.) 



RATES 



Q. Will the network institute a single 
rate for day and night on radio? 
A. ABC was headed that way at the 
time of the merger. It had just in- 
stituted a new policy for its O&O sta- 
tions of discounts at night in TV mar- 
kets, giving in effect a single rate for 
day and night. It's probable the policy 
will be continued unless the AB-PT 
planners come up with an entirely new 
approach after having had a chance 
to survey sales problems. 

Q. Deals? 

A. The nature of deals is that they are 
made when getting billings is a neces- 
sity — even at the cost of begetting more 
deals. With a new supply of capital 
and stronger programing to sell, AB- 
PT will be in a position to help sta- 
bilize network radio selling. 



FINANCES 



Q. How does ABC stand financially at 
the time of the merger? 
A. ABC's gross billings for the past 
two years were as follows: Radio bill- 
ings 1951, $33,708,846; in 1952 radio 
was $34,391,316 (with December esti- 
mated). Television in 1951 was $18,- 
585,911; in 1952, $17,697,140 (with 
December estimated). Profit for 1951 
was $369,000. A 1952 nine months' es- 
timate showed ABC losing $659,000 
for the year. 



FILM PLANS 



Q. Will AB-PT enter production of 
films for television? 
A. Yes. The network will compete 
with NBC and CBS in making available 
its own film packages. Probably the 
first of these to go into production will 
be Ozzie and Harriet for which the net- 
work owns rights. 

The network has facilities for film 
production at its KECA-TV studios in 
Hollywood. The station is housed on 
the old Vitagraph lot where Warner 
Bros, made many of its pictures. The 
Vitagraph lot was purchased in 1950 
by ABC for $2,500,000. • * * 



"Since going' on (he 
air we have 
enjoyed Hie 

BEST 
INCREASE 

IX (*) SALES 

since we started 
handling this product" 

This quote is from a letter by one of 
the local merchants who are using an 
all-time record volume of advertising 
on WSYR. These are the people who 
really know what keeps the cash reg- 
isters ringing. You can profit by their 
experience. 

*!Same of product and copy of 
letter on requett. 

Write, Wire, Phone or 
Ask Headley-Reed 

WACUSE 

570 KC 

NBC AFFILIATE 




COMPLETE BROADCASTING 
INSTITUTION IN 

nCicnmona. 



WMBG 



-AM 



-FM 



WCOD 
W T V R-« 

First Stations ot Virginia 

WTVR Blair TV Inc. 
WMBG The Boiling Co. 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



9T 



NOW! GOOD TV 

in 

MOBILE ALA! 

WKAB-TY 



CHANNEL 48 



CBS-DUMONT 
NETWORKS 




captivatin' 

KABBY 

says: 



"20,000 television sets al- 
ready in Mobile — and 
they're still coming fast!" 

Also, remember . . . 



WKAB 



the High-Daytime 
Hooper Bargain! 



A.M. 



CALL 




COMPANY 



Offices in: New York • Chicago • Atlanta 
Los Angeles • San Francisco 

SOUTHERN REPS.: 
Dora-Clayton Agency, Atlanta 









Robert Sarnoff, v.p. NBC Film Division, was 
recently awarded (along with Richard Rodgers and 
Henry Salomon) the Navy Distinguished Public 
Service Award. Citation said he made an "excep- 
tional contribution to public understanding of the 
history and mission of the U. S. Navy" in the 
production of the NBC TV series, Victory at Sea. 
Rodgers wrote the score, Salomon was producer. 



II illiam D. Stroben, Sylvania Radio and TV 
Div. advertising & sales promotion manager, recently- 
added cosponsorship of The Shadow to the firm's 
schedule. Aired on Mutual the program uses 542 
stations. Stroben hopes that the wide coverage 
afforded ivill make the name Sylvania familiar to 
potential TV prospects in areas soon to have UHF 
or VHF transmitters. Copy stresses "HaloLight." 



Leonard Colson. Mennen Co. ad manager, 
came up with another facet in his company's strategy 
of using local radio programs to plug the Mennen 
line. To prepare people of Morristown, N. J., for 
coming move of company plant to that city, Colson 
signed up for thrice-a-weeh airing of community- 
service show called Bulletin Board on WMTR. 
In addition to club and social notices, program 
will later include taped interviews with townfolk. 



EiBOtlOre Buehler, Revlon Products ad man- 
ager, announced the company's first entry into net TV 
via Jane Froman's U.S.A. Canteen on CBS TV 
Tuesday nights. Sponsor reasons that this program 
will reach a "high-type audience" containing a 
large number of women who place quality ahead of 
price consideration in purchasing beauty aids. 
Starts 10 February over more than 30 stations. 



92 



SPONSOR 




ADVERTISING COSTS UP? 



Take typography, for example. It now takes $184 
to buy composition that cost $100 in 1942. But for an adver- 
tising value that today is better than ever, there's radio. . the 
medium that's now delivering the biggest audience in history at 
a cost only slightly more than that of ten years ago! 

Take WBZ, for example. It now takes only 
$125 to buy a result-producing participation package 
that cost $100 in 1942. And the audience has in- 
creased much faster than the slight rise in time cost, 
throughout the vast New England territory dominated 
by WBZ's 50,000-watt voice! 

In six of the most important market-areas in the country, West- 
inghouse stations offer exceptional values in advertising cover- 
age. Free & Peters will help you pick the times that pay the 
best return for your business! 




WESTINGHOUSE RADIO STATIONS Inc 

WBZ • WBZA • KYW • KDKA • W0W0 • KEX • WBZ-TV 

National Representatives, Free & Peters, except for WBZ-TV; for WBZ-TV, NBC Spot Sales 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



93 




UNDUPUCATED 

COVERAGE IN 
253 000 HOMES 
WITH PERSISTENT 

SELLING TO MORE 

THAN 759,000 

PEOPLE . • • 

IN PROSPEROUS 

SOUTHERN 
NEW ENGLAND 



I 



WJAR-TV 

PROVIDENCE 




i 







j»- 



*P 






Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 



(Continued) 



Alfred E. Lyon, chairman of the board, Philip 
Morris & Co. Ltd. Inc., made the announcement 
that the company's key brand, Philip Morris 
cigarettes, is now available in both king and regular 
size. First word of new entry in the 85 mm. race 
reached the public via I Love Lucy. Announcements 
ami national distribution were postponed one week 
so as not to be buried under publicity avalanche 
caused by perfect timing of birth of son to stars 
of I Love Lucy, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. 



Thomas F. O'iVeil, president and board chair- 
man of the Mutual Broadcasting System, dis- 
appointed the trade crystal-ball gazers last week 
when he declined to name a replacement for William 
H. Fineshriber Jr., former MBS executive v.p. 
who moved to NBC. Instead, O'Neil moved the 
furniture out of his hotel suite into Mutual head- 
quarters and assumed active direction of the 
network effective 2 February. 



William ff. Fineshriber, Jr., executive v.p., 
MBS, has kept neivswriters on their toes aivaiting 
official ivord of his resignation from MBS and 
appointment as v.p. and general manager of radio 
and television networks. Move has been expected 
for some time due to Fineshriber's previous happy 
relationship with Frank White, recently appointed 
NBC prexy. The team got together at CBS in the 
'30s and have maanged to stick together while 
moving upward from network to network. 



}l a ri in S. Wiener, director of advertising and 
sales promotion for Howard Stores Corp., opened 
radio-TV campaigns in Detroit and Philadelphia 
for the firm's line of mens clothing. Howard's 
was in radio as early as 1927 but has been com- 
paratively inactive in recent years. Wiener 
joined firm last May and says two-city campaign 
is forerunner of multi-city spring saturation plan. 



J\. V. B. Cleoghegan, rice president in chargt 
ill media relations of Young it' Rubicam. Inc.. 
has been named co-chairman of the Plans Board. 
In the advertising field for 36 years, Tony 
Geoghegan has been a media man at Y&R for 
the past 28 years. His recent move into the top 
echelon points up the increased recognition being 
accorded to media specialists in agency planning. 



94 



SPONSOR 



llllilllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllM 
INTERNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS 

,, in ii n mi iimiim ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■" "" 



. INTERNATIONAL REPORT TO SPONSORS • • • INTER 



Cancellations, 

low ratings forced 

CBC to terms 



Aussies like radio 

best, according 

to Gallup Poll 



Otto expects TV 

to go commercial 

in 3 more 

European nations 



Bermuda reports 
high disposable 
income, no tax 



Radio reported 

top medium in 

British Guiana 



Lemire, Judge 

head Canadian 

organizations 



South Africa has 

610,889 licensed 

radios: Lamping 



Flamingo spear- 
heads Bahamas 
campaign with 
radio 



Reason why Canadian Broadcasting Corp. settled with CBS, NBC more or 
less on latter' s terms over how much to get for TV programs: 5 Canadi- 
an sponsors had refused to renew because of low ratings of available 
programs. Example: First 10 shows on WBEN-TV, Buffalo, heard in On- 
tario, had outranked CBLT, Toronto, top 10 overwhelmingly in Elliott- 
Haynes Teleratings for December. First U.S. network show broadcast to 
Canada: CBS* "Studio One" over both CBLT, Toronto, and CBFT, Montreal. 

-IRS- 

Australia had 1,968,971 licensed radio sets 30 November 1952 (8,186,- 
000 pop. in 1950), writes C. T. Sproule of Amalgamated Wireless Ltd., 
Sydney. Recent Gallup Poll on how Aussies like to spend evenings re- 
vealed following: 41% listen to radio, 19% go to movies, 16% read 
books, rest visit friends, play cards, go dancing. 

-IRS- 

Robert Otto, president, Robert Otto & Co., told SPONSOR he found "tre- 
mendous growth in international advertising" on recent European trip, 
heard m uch t a lk of commercial TV in Holland, Belgium, England this 
year. Daily TV broadcasts — no commercials — began in Hamburg (Western 
Zone) on Christmas and in East Germany 21 December (Joe Stalin's 
birthday) ; 5,000 video sets are reported unofficially in Western Ger- 
many, according to "Du Mont International Dispatch." (Japanese tele- 
vision had its debut on 1 February.) 

-IRS- 

Net spendable income per capita is far higher in Bermuda than in West- 
chester County, says Adam Young International's Steve Mann commenting 
on ZBM's new 24-page market r ep ort on Bermuda, which is available on 
request . Reason for wealth: no inoome tax, high employment. 

-IRS- 

British Guiana, with 30,000 radio homes out of estimated 150,000, can 
be covered adequately only by radio, according to Warren Robinson, 
general manager of Radio Demerara, Georgetown. He said in New York 
newspaper coverage is one-third r adio's chiefly due to illiteracy. 

-IRS- 

New president of French Broadcasting Assn. of Canada: Jean-Paul 
Lemire, CKCH, Hull. New president of Canada's National Assn. of Radio 
Station Reps.: Horace N. Stovin & Co.'s Ralph Judge, sales manager. 

-IRS- 

South Africa had 610,889 licensed radios as of September 1952, accord- 
ing to Frank Lamping, managing director, Davenport & Meyers, Johannes- 
burg, who quotes government figures. Only one lic ens e is needed per 
h ome, so Lamping feels sets number much higher. Transvaal has 43.6%. 

-IRS- 

Flamingo frozen foods entered Bahamas market with heavy ad campaign 
spearheaded by 6 or 8 announcements daily over Nassau's ZNS. Douglas 
Leigh, president, Leigh Foods, Inc., says Flamingo line entered export 
market year ago, is already first in Venezuela, near top in Bermuda. 



9 FEBRUARY 1953 



95 




This we fight for 

In our opinion, the proper role of a 
trade paper is not only to inform, but 
to actively lead the way. SPONSOR has 
built on this concept, and its unusual 
growth is in good measure due to the 
needs it has seen, the causes it has 
espoused. 

The true test of a trade paper edi- 
tor is his ability to focus on key neces- 
sities within the industry he serves, the 
soundness with which he analyzes an 
industry problem, the way in which he 
licks it. 

During sponsor's six years we have 
fought for a full and accurate count of 
radio listening, for better commercials, 
for proper use of radio and TV ratings, 
for increased recognition of timebuy- 
ers. for realistic radio rates, for new 
and creative program forms, for the 
formation of a BAB. for confidence in 
radio's future, for a TV bureau com- 
parable to radio's BAB. for reorgani- 
zation of the NAB I now NARTB). for 
a new name for spot. These, and many 
others, are the causes we have espoused. 

Let it be said that sponsor, though 
we have made our mistakes, has been 
no fence-straddler. We fight and hard. 

Today the things we stand for, the 
improvements we fight for are recorded 
in each bi-weekly issue. We set them 
forth briefly here so that every reader 
will know what they are. 

1. We fight for a full and accurate 
count of radio listening. Every 
medium is entitled to fair mea- 
surement, but radio's personal set 
listening and out-of-home listening 
have not been properly gauged. 

2. We fight for better radio and TV 
ratings, and a more realistic view 
of them. We are convinced thai 
radio and TV ratings are not the 
ultimate in deciding whether a 



sponsor's interests are being effec- 
tively served by his present pur- 
chase, nor the ultimate in deciding 
what to buy. We work to throw 
light on the weaknesses and 
strengths of ratings, educate ad- 
vertisers to their limitations as well 
as values. 

3. We fight for timebuyer status at 
all advertising agencies dealing 
with air media equal to space- 
buyer status. 

4. We fight for the prompt establish- 
ment of a TV promotion/research 
bureau comparable to radio's BAB 
or newspaper's Bureau of Adver- 
tising. 

5. We fight to encourage advertisers, 
agencies, networks, and stations to 
experiment with and create new 
program forms, to help the indus- 
try realize that such experimenta- 
tion and creativeness is essential 
to the growth of radio and TV. 

6. We fight to convince the adver- 
tiser that radio has a place in the 
American home which neither 
television nor any other medium 
can usurp; that there is a secure 
place for television as well. In- 
deed, we firmly believe that every 
honest medium has a firm niche in 
the rapidly expanding advertising 
firmament. 

7. We fight for a million-dollar BAB 
geared to show the national as well 
as local advertiser why radio is a 
great medium. We believe that in 
order to do its fullest job. fast- 
growing BAB needs constructive 
criticism from its industry. This 
we will do our best to provide. 

8. We fight for better, more effective 
commercials — we fight to everlast- 
ingly keep the advertiser aware of 
the importance of making his com- 
mercial the best possible salesman 
for his product. 

9. We fight to point out the danger 
of pricing TV out of the market. 
We constantly strive to show how 
this can be prevented. 

10. We fight to reveal the expanding 
role in recent years of the station 
representative, his transition from 
a strict sales role to a wide range 
of services that benefit advertiser 
and station alike. 

11. We fight for sound sensible net- 
work operations, both radio and 
TV, during these months of con- 
stant transition; a community of 
interests and action among net- 



works that will result in unity and 
strength for the air media. 

12. We fight for a realistic pegging of 
radio and TV rates, neither too 
high nor too low. 

13. We fight for development of a 
foolproof rating system, possibly a 
low-cost, electronic system based 
on adequate sample and capable of 
fast returns. 

14. We fight for easier methods of co- 
ordinating and executing spot ra- 
dio and TV campaigns. Much 
more spot would be used if agen- 
cies could be shown ways to mini- 
mize the details presently inherent 
in these potent media. 

15. We fight for first-hand knowledge 
of radio and TV stations by na- 
tional advertisers, advertising 
agency buyers, network execu- 
tives. We urge a grass-roots ap- 
proach to the stations of America 
by a "let's see for ourselves" atti- 
tude which will take big-city buy- 
ers to Kansas City, Seattle. Ban- 
gor, Albert Lea, San Antonio, Bir- 
mingham, South Bend. Baton 
Rouge, Toronto and hundreds of 
other markets. 

The new ABC 

Just when the FCC would issue its 
consent for the merger of the American 
Broadcasting Co. and United Para- 
mount Theatres was in doubt when we 
put this issue of sponsor to press. But 
whenever the news actually broke, it 
was sure to go down as the top story 
of the past few years in the annals of 
radio and television. It was for this 
reason that sponsor worked for many 
months to prepare an article designed 
to give readers the best possible un- 
derstanding of the significance, back- 
ground, and people who make up the 
merger (see page 27). 

sponsor's article makes clear that in 
the new AB-PT network NBC and CBS 
will find a competitor better able to 
compete on their level. UPT has told 
the FCC it plans to invest from its not 
inconsiderable resources in building 
the network program and personnel- 
wise. It's a building process in which 
everyone stands to gain. 

With competition quickened, all the 
networks mav find themselves exerting 
greater effort to develop new programs, 
new personalities, new ways of attract- 
ing and holding audience. Out of that 
effort radio and television advertisers 
— as well as the public — will benefit 
immeasurably. 



96 



SPONSOR 



FEELTH 



PULSE 



// 






X 



/ 



•< 



OF THE 

HEART OF 
AMERICA! 



NW 



m 



J_jate last year (November 5-11 and December 1-7, 1952), The Pulse, Inc., made 
its first Kansas City radio listener survey. The results, like those of all previous 
Kansas City surveys, are phenomenally "KMBC-ish" ! Here's what we mean — 

7 of the top 11 nighttime programs are on KMBC! 

9 of the top 10 five-a-week daytime programs are on KMBC! 

For years this picture of KMBC dominance in the Kansas City primary trade 
area has been a well established fact. The new Pulse of Kansas City shows the 
same wide margin of superiority. More important, the superiority exists hour 
after hour, day in and day out. Yes indeed, the Pulse-beat in the Heart of America 
is KMBC — listener preference that means more impacts and more sales per 
advertising dollar. 

Any Free & Peters colonel or member of the KMBC-KFRM sales staff has the 
entire Pulse story, and a lot of other information of utmost interest to you. 



» i i ' ; 

mil 



WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE your nearest Free & Peters office or 
KMBC-KFRM at Kansas City. Sell the whole Heart of America, 
wholeheartedly with . . . 



p KMBC-KFRM 

CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY MIDLAND BROADCASTING COMPANY 



o 

J 

Television 
j? Station 

3? Representatives 






magazine for Radio and TV advertisers 










Who ffot the KJrchid in ^rtlanta f 

(WE DON'T KNOW) 

e^r o/# ao know who aot . . . 



£< 



(arnation 



EVAPORATED 

MILK 

VITAMIN D INCREASED • HOMOGENIZED 



26fy quarter hours 
on 'ROLL JORDAN" 
2:15-2:30 P.M. Mon.-Fri. 
thru Erwin, Wasey & Co. 




WGOV KWEM WJIV WEAS 



Valdosta, Ga. 
5000 WATTS 



West Memphis Ark 
Memphis, Tenn. 

lOOO WATTS 



Savannah, Ga. 
lOOO WATTS 



Atlanta - Decofur, Go. 
10,000 WATTS 



Call your nearest FORJOE office or STARS, Inc., Candler Building, Atlanta, Georgia 



MORE STATIONS 
TV SHOW KILLEf 






page 30 



What timebuyers 
want to know 
about UHF televisic 

page 32 




How a top Sear 
store uses radio 

age 35 





Air 1 



media help spur 
U.S. boom in 
sewing machines 

page 36 

Why you should 
reexamine nighttime 
spot radio 



■ 



, 



age 38 




ARBI shows retailers 
miss customers 
unless they use radio 

page 40 



How TV raised 
Masland Rugs 
to top five 

page 4? 





Benrus 




Watch Company 



DOES A COMPLETE JOB.. 



SO DO HAVENS AND MARTIN, Inc. STATIONS . . . 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



rWT£ 





thesouth'S first television station 



FIRST STATIONS OF VIRGINIA 



Tick! Tick! Tick! The precise movement 

of a Benrus is the result of years of painstaking 

care and skill, devoted to turning out a "watch of 

guaranteed accuracy." Benrus represents well 

the complete and careful job done by the 

First Stations of Virginia! 

Havens & Martin, Inc. Stations are the result, too, 
of years of determined effort to build a broadcasting 
institution replete with entertainment and public service. 
Advertisers long ago realized the selling power of this 
type of station. Are these pioneer outlets in 
Richmond selling your products? 



WMBG am WCOD ™ WTVR 



Havens & Martin Inc. Stations are the only 
complete broadcasting institution in Richmond. 
Pioneer NBC outlets for Virginia's first market. 
WTVR represented nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 
WMBG represented nationally by The Boiling Co. 



Esty cooking 

up 2 shows 

for Cen. Mills 



What's on 

mind 

of agency 

directors 



Lucky Strike 

on $1.3 million 

film nut 



CBS swoops 

down on 

WBKB 



Big ABC 

moves await 

get-acquainted 

period 



Duncan Hines 
pyramids spot 




William Esty agency has moved into the General Mills fold. Official 
announcement of product will be made around 1 March. Meantime Esty 
is working on 2 house-built TV shows for General Mills account, one 
adult, other children's show. 

-SR- 

SPONSOR asked radio-TV directors of 6 major ad agencies what 3 prob- 
lems concerned them most today. Consensus embraced: (1) where were 
they going to get money for all desirable TV markets to be available 
this fall; (2) what was going to happen to big NBC packages, like 
"Your Show of Shows," "All-Star Revue," "Comedy Theatre"; (3) whether 
networks would use hiatus periods this summer to experiment with new 
formats, or just fill open time as cheaply as possible. 

-SR- 

American Tobacco Co. probably ranks among advertisers as second heavi- 
est investor in TV film properties ; No. 1 is Procter & Gamble. Ameri- 
can underwrote full production cost plus overhead on 26 episodes each 
of both "Biff Baker, U.S.A." and "Private Secretary" (Ann Sothern). 
"Baker" has been canceled as of 26 April. ATC will use remaining 
episodes of this series, with some reruns, as summer fillers for "Hit 
Parade." Sponsor's guaranteed investment on 52 films exceeds 
$1,300,000, it is reported. 

-SR- 

CBS TV t oo k no chances on being en j oined from occupying WBKB, Chicago, 
following FCC's approval of ABC-UPT merger. Within hour after merger 
became formal (9 February), CBS TV turned over required check for $6 
million to merged company and half hour later new bosses were not only 
running station but selling time on it. While FCC was considering 
merger, Zenith applied for WBKB's channel, which gave rise to the 
possibility that Zenith might resort to the courts. Another source of 
CBS trepidation was DuMont which opposed the merger before the FCC. 

-SR- 

No major decisions are expected to come out of ABC-United Paramount 
Theatres merger until mid-March. Interim is being devoted to getting 
acquainted. Series of regional meetings will probably be held at 
which Robert E. Kintner, ABC president, will introduce incoming exec- 
utive v.p. Robert H. O'Brien to affiliates. Policies involving adop- 
tion of sin gle rate for network radio, revived compensation formula 
for TV affiliates, enhancement o f ABC TV's program i ng structu re will 
be explored. Key TV objective is to build up guaranteed clearances. 
AB-PT President Leonard Goldenson's trip to Coast shortly will be 
purely to look over ABC real estate. 

-SR- 

Duncan Hines cake mixes has spent in neighborhood of $1,000,000 for 
sat ura t ion radi o announcement s supplemented with spot TV during past 
19 months. Gardner of St. Louis is agency, and Nebraska Consolidated 
Mills Co., manufacturer of the cake mixes. 



SPONSOR, Volume 7, No. 4. 23 February 1953. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Pub'iratlons. Inc., at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive, Editorial, Advertising, Circu- 
lation Offices 510 Madison Ave.. New York 22. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 23 February 1 953 



Tastediet 

buying 

local shows 



Has tape 
hurt performer? 



NBC count 

indicates 

46% TV set 

saturation 



Tartan 

concentrating 

on radio 

spots 

SAC deal 

stalled over 

jingle 

vocalists 



SAC strike 
stymies Rinso 



Unions widen 

anti-foreign 

film tack 



Flotill Products Corp. (Tastediet) will step up its radio and TV spot 
campaign considerably through its new agency, Geyer. Agency's radio- 
TV director, Norman Blackburn, will spend next several weeks in field 
looking at loc a l p r ogr a ms for participation buys. Account will prob- 
ably spend around $750,000 in 1953. Henry Trumbull is a/e. 

-SR- 

Impression is gaining among key exscutives in network producing cir- 
cles that taping of programs o pera te s to disadvantage of personality 
performers. These programing officials argue taping not only reduces 
feeling of spontaneity to minimum but performer can't give best per- 
formance when knows he can do it over again. They warn increasing 
tendency among such network performers to tape their shows can lead 
to serious drop in quality of radio programing. 

-SR- 

NBC's count for number of TV sets in U.S. as of 1 January was 21,- 
234,000. This represents jump of about 800,000 sets over total for 
1 December 1952. On basis 21,234,100 sets, over 46% of all home s_in 
country are now TV-eq uip ped. Gain in sets over 1951 totaled 
5,500,000, NBC figures indicate. 

-SR- 

Tartan Suntan Lotion (McKesson & Robbins 
spot radio in its 1953 spring and summer 
product will be through Ellington & Co. 
what it was last year for radio. 

-SR- 



will include saturation 
campaign. Buying for the 
Budget will be in excess of 



Producers of film commercials fear negotiations with Screen Actors 
Guild may drag through March because of contract recomm e ndations from 
ANA' s radio and TV c om mittee. Advertiser group advised industry nego- 
tiators to resist SAG's demand that off-camera jingle vocalists be ac- 
corded same reuse payment arrangemsnt as any other performer. SAG 
decided to hold tight to this principle after meeting with AFTRA 
officials, who pointed out that in transcribed radio commercials jin- 
gle singers are entitled to reuse money. SAG board is not disposed to 
submit any proposition to its membership until it is certain compro- 
mised agreement has approval top TV advertisers. 

-SR- 

Strike on film commercials is h olding up some of media planning for 
Lever Bros.' detergent-version of Rinso. Account can't determine 
what it wants to do exactly with TV spot until it knows how TV commer- 
cials will have to be handled. In launching test campaign in Kansas 
City on new product Lever confined media to radio and newspapers. 

-SR- 

Hollywood's A.F.L. Film Council, composed of studio unions, is in- 
creasing its pressure on advertisers to refrain from using TV films 
made out si de U.S. Particular target of the group has been Ballantine 
Beer, which sponsors and distributes European-produced "Foreign In- 
trigue." Council's argument: TV films made for American viewing and 
advertising American products should be American made. 



SPONSOR 



Here is 
Youngstown's 

FIRST 



Television Picture 



as it appeared from 
Youngstown's FIRST TV station 




WKBN-TV Test Pattern went on the air January 6, 1953, inaugurated live studio 
programs January 11. transmitted network programs January 20. 



Within the first three weeks of operation, these national 
advertisers had already scheduled their programs on WKBN-TV. 



Admiral Corporation 

American Cigar & Cigarette Co. 

American Machine & Foundry Co. 

The American Tobacco Co. 

Blatz Brewing Co. 

Block Drug Co. 

Bristol-Myers Co. 

Carnation Company 

Carter Products Inc. 

Cats Paw Rubber Co. 

Electric Companies of America 



Erie Brewing Co. 

General Cigar Co. 

General Foods Corp. 

Greyhound Corp. 

Liggett and Myers Tobacco Co. 

P. Lorillard Co. 

Oldsmobile Div., General Motors 

Pabst Sales Co. 

Remington Rand Co. 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. 



Schick, Inc. 

Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co. 

Scott Paper Co. 

Singer Sewing Machine Co. 

Srandard Oil Co. of Ohio 

Sweets Co. of America 

Sylvania Electric Products Co. 

The Toni Company 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. 

Willys Overland Motors 



WKBN 



~i 



Pioneers in Youngstown 

FIRST in Radio 
FIRST in Television 



WKBN-TV 

Affiliated with 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT NETWORKS 
Represented by R a y m e r 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



advertisers use 



23 February 1953 
Volume 7 Numbed 



ARTICLES 



SPONSOR eraluates 2 key post-freeze problems 

1. Post-freeze audience competition 

Era of one-station market is ending. That means net shows will soon face com- 
petition from two or more other networks in each market. This report tells how 
you can estimate a show's ability to stand up on basis of its track record 

2. I III television: what tiniebuycrs want to know about it 

Answers questions like these: How do UHF and VHF differ in coverage? What 
are the "bugs" in UHF? How are they being licked? 

ffotv a top Sears store uses radio 

Sears, Roebuck has never encouraged extensive use of radio by its stores. But 
manager of its Tucson store who won six prizes in firm's recent sales competition 
used radio to help make his sales record 

Pfaff: from zero to $20 miff ion in 5 years 

Air-minded German company is one of foreign firms which have stirred hot 
competition in post-war U. S. sewing-machine sales. Network radio, spot radio 
and TV have Ivelped point its sales curve toward the ceiling 

Why you shouhl reexamine nighttime spot radio 

Stations and reps are marshaling some impressive arguments for reevaluation of 
nighttime spot radio by advertisers. One of most important is fact that many 
night availabilities are going begging while delivering audience at a lower 
cost-per- 1,000 than day slots clients stand in line for 

You need both 

ARBI media tests at the point-of-sale have demonstrated an important marketing 
fact for retailers, namely that they miss out on influencing a major body of 
consumers unless they use both radio and newspaper advertising 

TV puf MasUind earpet in top 5 

Consumers had difficulty remembering the Masland name, firm found. TV upped 
identification of the product, helped boost Masland into top carpet ranks 



COMING 



Retailer's guide to radio 

President of ARBI, Joseph B. Ward, has travebd U. S. speaking to retailers. 
Out of his experience he has written an article for SPONSOR in which he lists 
questions retailers ask him most frequently about the air media and his replies 



TV program easts 

An evaluation of where program costs are headed and what various program 
types will probably cost at the start of the next fall season 



:i© 



32 



35 



36 



3H 



Hi 



42 



U Mar eh 



.*> March 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

MEN, MONEY & MOTIVES 

510 MADISON 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, C. Gifford 

P. S. 

NEW TV STATIONS 

COMMERCIAL REVIEWS 

FILM TOP 20 

FILM NOTES 

TV RESULTS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

AGENCY PROFILE, A. Duram 

ROUND-UP 

NEWSMAKERS iN ADVERTISING 1 

INTERNATIONAL REPORT . 1 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 1 



6 

10 
12 

«i 

221 

24 

At 

50 

56 

58 

62 

64 

6: 

6' : 






Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper GUnn 

Executive Editor: Ben Bodoc 

Managing Editor: Miles David 

Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jef, 

Department Editor: Lila Lederman 

Assistant Editors: Richard A. Jackson, Evelyt 

Konrad, Joan Baker 

Special Projects Editor: Ray Lapica 

Contributing Editors: R. J. Landry, Bob 

Foreman 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Vice President - Advertising: Norman Knigt> 

Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coop* 
(Western Manager), Maxine Cooper ( Easterr; 
Manager), Gust J. Theodore (Chicago Repre-j 
sentative), Wallace Engelhardt (Southerr 
Representative), John A. Kovchok ( Produc 
tion Manager), Cynthia Soley, John McCcr 
mack 

Vice President - Business Mgr.: Bernard Plot 

Circulation Department: Ev«lyn Sati (Sub 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 

Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Publlihcd biweekly hv SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation, as 
Advertising Offices: 510 Madison Ave.. New York H 
N. Y. Telephone: MI'rray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Officii 
161 B. Urand Ave.. Suite 110 Telephone: 8Uperlor 7-W« 
West Coast Office: fiOX" Sunset Boulevard. Loa Angel 
Telephone: Hillside sokk Printing Office: 8110 El 
Ave. rtallliniire 11, lid. Subscription* I'nlied Stall 
(8 a year Canada and foreign $9 Single rnplee '"' 
Printed in IT. 8. A. Address all correspondence to Bj 
Madison Avenue. New Tn'k 22. N.T MI'rrav Hill t-tlt 
Copyright 1953. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS In| 




/fiT/fjv 



FURTHER EXPANDS 
ITS SERVICE TO 



182.429 



ARKANSAS 
FARMERS 



w 



HEN, in March of 1951, KLRA added John R. Holmes 
to its staff as Farm Service Director, it took a long step forward 
in service to the farm folks of Arkansas. Johnnie became the 
first and only full-time Farm Reporter operating in Arkansas. 
Now, to further expand KLRA service, and to cover Arkansas 
farm news more completely, KLRA is pleased to make this 
announcement: 



JIM MOFFET, a January, 1953, graduate of the University of 
Arkansas College of Agriculture, has joined our staff as Johnnie's 
assistant. John and Jim will cover all important farm meetings, 
sales, demonstrations, fairs, and will visit important farm im- 
provement programs all over the state. A new concept of Farm 
Service is being instituted by KLRA in the early morning period. 




JOHN R. HOLMES 
KLRA Farm Service Director 




JIM MOFFET 
KLRA Assistant Farm Service Director 



10,000 WATTS DAYTIME 
5,000 WATTS NIGHT 
1010 KC 
"ARKANSAS'S LISTENING HA8IT" 

23 FEBRUARY 1953 




YOUR O. L. TAYLOR COMPANY 

MAN WILL GIVE YOU 

COMPLETE DETAILS! 



■• .. 




49" STATE 



By Jack Burnett 



It is to be hoped 



that statistics and 
articles regularly published in Sponsor are more 
authentic than their article on radio in Hawaii 
in the January 12th issue. While the purpose 
was to point the strength of radio in general, 
it certainly would leave any timebuyer in noth- 
ing but a complete state of confusion. We 
take exception to practically all of it, except 
the specific racial descendant percentages and 
a few other statistics. Here are some of the 
outstanding misprints'. 

7. "In any case, you can't cover Hilo from 
Honolulu, and the sponsor who depends on one 
station to blanket the Hawaiian Islands is go- 
ing to lose out." Fact is that signal strength 
measurements by W. D'Orr Cozzens, FCC ap- 
proved consulting engineer, measured .77 m/v 
at Hilo, 1.06 m/v at Waimea and 2.24 m v on 
the Kona Coast, the three "Big Island" popu- 
lated areas, plus the fact that 21 local adver- 
tisers in Hilo regularly use Kula. This state- 
ment distorts the picture and damages Hawaii's 
most powerful and highest rated station. 

2. "But at year-end only 6,900 Honolulu 
homes had TV." By the distributors' organi- 
zation's own statement, 5.125 television sets 
had been sold by January 15th, not all deliv- 
ered, and admittedly at least 30% in homes 
that could get little, if any, picture from cur- 
rent low-powered, single bay TV operations. 
There will have to be some terrific activity to 
have 20,000 television homes by March 1, 1953. 

3. Under the picture of KULA's "Nisei Home 
and Food Exhibit" the statement, "Hawaiian 
stations merchandise heavliy" might imply that 
all stations merchandise as does KULA. Ridicu- 
lous! True, KULA considers, next to 94% na- 
tional renewals for 1953, its greatest compli- 
ment to be consistent copying of its operation 
by competition, but Sponsor's statement is far 
from the truth. 

4. On Page 54 of this issue, Soonsor volun- 
teers the reason a few brands of certain cate- 
gories corner 80% to 90% of the total market: 
"The reason for one-sided domination by cer- 
tain products: Plantation stores used to limit 
their stocks to a single brand primarily to 
conserve space." 

What percentage of this generation ever traded 
at Plantation stores? 15% would be stretching 
it tremendously. If Sponsor's reason for this 
domination were correct, why is not the same 
true in every field, rather than just three or 
four? The real answer is that this is a very 
brand conscious market, the products that 
dominate have studied the pattern, advertise 
merchandise, and all use KULA heavily. 

5. The term "polyglot" describes such places 
as Singapore, Hongkong or Shanghai. The per- 
centage of American citizenship runs much 
higher in the islands than in many mainland 
markets: New York, San Francisco, etc. 

Honolulu is a fc/g,busy metropolis, in 
a market of more than half a million people 
when you include the military and thousands 
of attached civil service families. Inherited 
racial characteristics require a different ap- 
proach sometimes, an approach best achieved 
through radio, but Hawaii is in actuality a 
healthy, grov/ing 100% American Community! 



fiiMiipi 





Walter Botve, Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, 
maintains "Four- and eight-second announcements 
work on TV. We feel they can be just as effective 
on radio." For Rinso's five-week spring radio cam- 
paign Walter is buying a minimum of 100 "quickies" 
weekly in each of 100 markets east of the Mississippi. 
''We're paying each station's evaluation of what 
four and eight seconds are worth," says he. His 
precedent: a highly successful announcement 
campaign for another account he buys for — Good 
Luck Margarine — in New York State last summer. 



Sherwood Heath, Ruthrauff & Ryan, is poring 
over reps' lists of women's radio and TV shows for 
Glamorene's national spring spot campaign. "We're 
looking for a woman personality in each TV market 
to sell the product," he explains. And, with more 
than half of Glamorene's %\ million 1953 ad budget 
devoted to the spring push, Sherwood can afford 
to be choosy. Scheduled to start 9 March, Glamo- 
rene's JS-minute participations and announcements 
will run in 79 markets for eight- to 13-iveek periods. 
Glamorene also will participate in Garroway's Today. 



fieorge Neumann, David J. Mahoney Advertis- 
ing, has had great expectations since Virginia Dare's 
W-week national spot radio-TV campaign got 
underway 9 February: "Garrett Wine Co. used to aim 
for a strictly male audience with late-evening an- 
nouncements. But we've found that women influence 
the buying of table nines, so we're switching our 
buying pattern." In fine with this thinking, George 
has placed Virginia Dare's one-minute e.t.'s on early- 
morning d.j. and news adjacencies in 95 radio mar- 
kets, with evening announcements in 20 TV markets. 



Evelyn Jones, Donahue & Coe, says the New 
York Herald Tribune is one of the heaviest spot TV 
users among newspapers today. Newspapers outside 
large metropolitan centers have not yet plunged 
into TV advertising to a significant degree. "Since 
we promote the Sunday magazine section," Evelyn 
explains, "we get on the air mainly from 6:00 p.m. 
to midnight Saturdays — as close to buying time as 
possible." Her most recent purchase: 6 O'Clock News 
on WCBS-TV, "not because it's news, but because 
the time's right for our particular purposes." 



SPONSOR 




OUTSHINES THEM ALL 
99.8% 



Domination of 16-County Area 
Q MORE Listeners ALL the Time* 



For over 25 years, time buyers have found that whatever their sales goal in Western 
New York, WHAM consistently outshines the competition. And for good reason! 
WHAM dominates 16 Western New York-Northern Pennsylvania Counties. The 
latest area PULSE proves again that WHAM alone with 99-8% listener preference 
can do your selling job to more people than any of the 24 radio stations in the area. 

Call the HOLLINCBERY Representative for Complete Details 



WHAM 



PULSE (Oct. -Nov. '52) interviewed 6200 homes in 
WHAM-land. Out of 552 measured quarter-hour 
broadcast periods, WHAM was FIRST in 551 . Truly 
overwhelming coverage and listener preference ! 



mmbmBJii in mm ml 



The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y. Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 kc 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 






American Broadcasting 

And Unitec 



Mer 







ABC 



AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPAQ 



iCompany 
Paramount Theatres 



The BIG Radio -TV news story. . . and what it means to you 



i The most important news in the television and radio 
li industry in years has been announced. The long-planned 
union of ABC and United Paramount Theatres has been 
i\ approved by the Federal Communications Commission, 
' and the two organizations are now one company. 

The event is of far more significance than any statistics 
of the corporate merger. The new company will be 
impressively stronger and more flexible, and possess a 
greater potential for growth. 

The combination is a "natural" if ever there was one. 
United Paramount's great history of showmanship and 
superb experience discovering and developing new talent 



will now be available to the American Broadcasting 
Company. 

But the really great thing about the news is the 
tremendous promise the merger holds for the radio 
and television audience. 

New programs will be developed. New stars will be 
attracted. New techniques will be introduced. New fa- 
cilities will be developed. Not tomorrow, of course. Not 
next week, or next month. But ABC intends to be a 
leader in radio and television, and it intends to grow 
like an oak, not a mushroom. 

The future began yesterday. So keep your eyes and 
ears on the new ABC. 




i 



A DIVISION OF AMERICAN BROADCASTING-PARAMOUNT THEATRES. INC. 



r 



ABC 



LOADED? 




C"i'iV-/fi#' l,ia 




Hooper 

"If you've got some- 
thing to sell, we can 
make a /eef/e room for 
you to reach the tenth 

largest agricultural 
market in the U. S. . . . 

a market larger than 
10 states combined. 



' Let us show you why 

we're NUMBER ONE 
in San Diego. 



KSDO 

1130 KC 5000 WATTS 



Representatives 

Fred Stubbins Los Angeles 
Doren MtGovren Son Francisco 
John E. Pearson, Co. New York 




by 

Robert J. Landry 



The rep's progress 

In 1943, then 10 years in business, the national sales representa- 
tive firm of Paul H. Kaymer arranged a sentimental party for the 
advertising agency timebuyers and account executives with whom 
Raymer originally had done business in the misty beginnings of 
1934. Recently, on 5 February, to be exact. Paul Raymer, Fred 
Brokaw. and Madeleine Vose, now 20 years in business, presided at 
a second decade party. The ritual of nostalgia was repeated for 
those who attended the original party at this time. 



This not being a society gossip column, we shall leave unre- 
ported who attended the Raymer party, what the ladies wore, what the 
men drank, or how much, and whether or not a good time was had 
by all. which we shall assume. Suffice that the Raymer commemora- 
tion serves to point up the many changes, the undoubted status of 
importance, and the colorful history of station repping, as such. 



Pater jamilias of the field is, of course. Edward Petry. He it was 
who recognized the inevitability of setting up a system of time 
brokerage which would have businesslike stability. Before Petry 
there had been general, or nonexclusive, station representation. This 
was partly due to the early reluctance of advertising agencies to make 
up their minds that radio was here to stay. In consequence it was 
standard practice for the old nonexclusive reps, of whom the late 
Scott Howe Bowen was the dean, to go over the heads of the agencies 
and sell programs, campaigns, merchandising gimmicks, or whatever, 
to the advertisers direct. Many and various were the heartburns and 
exasperations between client and agencv induced by the aggressions 
of the general time brokers. The latter represented everybody, and 
yet represented nobody. Petry foresightedly planned a relationship 
which harmonized rather than antagonized the agencies and which 
introduced the principle that a time broker should have a list of 
stations, his and his alone, from which he could work. 



Two decades have now passed. Petry is still top kick in the rep 
field. The other largest-volume houses, among them Katz, Free & 
Peters. Blair, Raymer, Weed, Hollingbery. Avery-Knodel, are mostly 
the oldtimers. Interestingly, there has been no sharp segregation of 
television from radio. It is pretty generally taken for granted that 
any radio operator who secures a TV license will have his regular 
station rep handle that. too. This is especiall) true since the com- 
bined total of radio and TV billings will earn for the station a re- 
duced percentage rate of commissions to the rep. Only one new and 
exclusively television-sellini: station rep firm has flourished, Harring- 
ton. Righter & Parsons, and the trade does not expect emulation. 

I Please turn to pare 96) 



10 



SPONSOR 



we gambled... 




■i 




mmemm 



IT'S GOING 

UP! 




KMTV's huge antenna is now 
being adapted for maximum 
power — 100,000 watts. As this 
issue of Sponsor reaches your 
desk, KMTV's new 6 bay an- 
tenna (RCA's latest model) is 
going up. 

KMTV's new 25,000 watt 
amplifiers have already been in- 
stalled and the scheduled date 
for KMTV's boost to 100,000 
watts is March 15. 

This power boost is still an- 
other reason why advertisers 
should choose KMTV — Omaha's 
most looked at — listened to 
Television station. * 



* According to Omaha's most 
recent Pulse Survey (Jan. 2-8, 
1953) KMTV has 8 of the top 
10 shows. 



KfflTV Du Kr 

OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 
CHANNEL 3 



Now Represented By 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 




Madison 

COOPERATIVE ADVERTISING 

We are interested in getting articles 
on dealer cooperative advertising in 
radio and television. We would like 
this information to cover various mar- 
kets, such as the appliance, automotive, 
and farm equipment markets. Our 
problem can probably best be summed 
up by listing the four questions we are 
trying to answer: 

1. In general, what way is coopera- 
tive advertising handled? Is it through 
regional distributors or directly through 
the dealers? 

2. What value is placed on radio 
and TV cooperative advertising? By 
this we mean, what percent of the bud- 
get is used for AM and TV cooperative 
advertising? 

3. What media do the dealers like 
best for advertising their products (co- 
operative) ? 

4. What does the dealer spend for 
non-cooperative advertising and what 
media are used? 

Any information you can give us on 
this subject would be greatly appreci- 
ated. 

If you are unable to help us, do you 
know of any study on cooperative ad- 
vertising that is available to the public 
or some other source where we might 
obtain this information? 

Patricia McNiven 
Research Analyst 
The B uchen Co. 
Chicago 

# Articles dealing with dealer coop advertising 
appeared in SPONSOR 16 January 1950, page 34; 
14 January 1952, page 40; 16 June 1952, page 36. 



NBC ESTIMATES 

Your lead article in the 26 January 
issue, "Coming: better Nielsen rat- 
ings?" stales that the Nielsen study of 
TV circulation corroborates the NBC 
estimates. 

We think this statement requires a 
little amplification. 

In the first place, it should be said 
that even though Nielsen corroborates 
NBC on an over-all, national basis, it 
does noi necessarily confirm NBC's dis- 
tribution of total sets between stations. 
As a mater of fact, (here is convincing 
evidence that NBC's estimate for 
WBTV (Charlotte, N. C.) was low by 
at least 25-30,000 sets. I understand 



that in other cases, NBC's estimates 
proved to be high. 

All parties interested in TV circu- 
lation should also bear constantly in 
mind that NBC's estimates, as NBC 
plainly states, are made on a network, 
unduplicated basis and therefore are 
not even intended to reflect total sta- 
tion circulation. 

Bob Covington 
Assistant Vice President 
Jefferson Standard Bdcstg. Co. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



ADV. RESEARCH FOUNDATION 

Many thanks for the story about 
ARF in the 12 January issue. From the 
favorable comments we've heard about 
it so far, would judge that the article 
is getting widespread readership. 

E. F. Herrick 

Advertising Research Foundation 

New York 



FOREIGN-LANGUAGE RADIO 

I am sure many others will be writ- 
ing you about the excellent treatment 
given foreign-language radio in the ar- 
ticle of the same name in the 26 Jan- 
uary issue of sponsor. . . . While we 
feel that perhaps more prominence 
should have been given to the pioneer- 
ing and continuing work of Harlan G. 
Oakes, of the Harlan G. Oakes & As- 
sociates Co. in Los Angeles, for whom 
we act as New York office on many 
Spanish-language stations, and per- 
haps more attention could have been 
paid to the growing awareness on the 
part of many Spanish-language stations 
of the increasing need for proper mer- 
chandising and promotion, we cannot 
help but admire the article. 

With these thorough and periodic 
articles on foreign-language radio, 
sponsor is indeed rendering a fine ser- 
vice to advertisers. . . . 

Arthur Gordon 
Sales Manager 
National Time Sales 
Neiv York 



NEW TV STATIONS 

Your article in the January 12 issue 
about television station growth fasci- 
nated me. but I notice that we are con- 
spicuously omitted from your list of 
markets to be added in 1953. Our ini- 
tial test pattern went on January 25 



12 



SPONSOR 




KCBQ was the first station in the nation to switch to 
the new ABC-UPT. With its vast resources in capital and 
talent, the new ABC is now the "Royal Flush" of 



the entertainment business. 



cfa 




(£fm ltd 



see your Avery-Knodel r e j_f_e_j__g_n_J_fl_LJ— LJL 



KCBQ 

CHARLES E SAUK President ^^ 




.3 



GET A 

STRIKE 

EVERYTIME 

WITH 

YOUR 

PERSISTENT 

SALESMAN 

UNDUPLICATED 

COVERAGE IN 
280,000 HOMES 
WITH PERSISTENT 
SELLING TO MORE 
THAN 840,000 
PEOPLE. . . 
IN PROSPEROUS 
SOUTHERN 
NEW ENGLAND 

WJAR-TV 



PROVIDENCE 




and our programing started January 
31. Is this early enough to "qualify 
for your list?" 

I notice your list includes New Eng- 
land outlets of which I believe not one 
will be on the air as soon as WABI-TV. 

Our antenna is in place and ready to 
go; our building is ready for installa- 
tion of equipment all of which is in our 
possession and was installed beginning 
Wednesday, January 21. 

We are affiliated with CBS, ABC, 
and Du Mont, and hope to be affiliated 
with NBC by the time you get this 
letter. 

Orders are pouring in from national 
advertisers to start January 31. So I 
guess we'll start. 

What on earth is the source of Mc- 
Cann-Erickson's data about starting 
dates? No wonder we didn't have any 
orders from McCann-Erickson — at 
least none that I can think of. 

Murray Carpenter 
WABI-TV 
Bangor, Me. 

• Reader Carpenter will he glad to hear that 
WABI-TV is included in the new SPONSOR de- 
partment. "Directory of new and upcoming TV 
stations, " effective 9 February issue. SPONSOR'S 
li>t was compiled for the 12 January article on 
future TV growth during December 1952 with the 
ai:l of NBC TV's research department. The big 
map of U.S. TV's future was from McCann-Erick- 
son; the list wasn't. NGC TV was somewhat re- 
luctant to release its list. Changes in starting 
dates occur so often among upcoming TV sta- 
tions that station lists change almost daily. WABI- 
TV mav well have been lost in the shuffle, for 
which SPONSOR apologizes. 



Represented Nationally by 

Weed Television 



RADIO-TV CLINICS 

Jack Jackson's letter of appreciation 
for the wonderful RFD article in spon- 
sor (29 December 1952) jolted my 
memory to the point that 1 am going 
to have to take time off from organi- 
zational duties of NARFD to express 
deep appreciation for a job well done. 

We have already had several letters 
from readers of SPONSOR inquiring 
about the organization and work of 
NARFD and asking about membership 
possibilities. 

You will be interested to know that 
about 30 radio people gathered in 
Omaha recently to talk about the pos- 
sibility of organizing farm radio-TV 
clinics across the U.S. for the purpose 
of telling the farm radio story to folks 
u In. a re it I well acquainted w itli w hat 
radio and TV farm directors can do in 
selling the sponsors' products. 
Mal Hansen 

President 

National Association of 
Radio Farm Directors 



HAWAII STATUS REPORT 

I think your Hawaiian story (12 
January) is terrific! To my knowledge 
this is the first and, without any ques- 
tion, the finest, most complete rundown 
of island radio ever done! sponsor 
leads the pack again! 

G. P. FlTZPATRICK 

Promotion Manager 

Free & Peters, Inc., New York 

• Besides Mr. Filzpatrick, SPONSOR also wishes 
to thank the leading experts among the top 
Hawaiian station reps in New York who checked 
the Hawaiian story before it went to press. For 
another viewpoint on SPONSOR'S article, see 
KULA's ad on page 6. 



Your status report on the Hawaiian 
Islands in the 12 January 1953 issue 
of your fine magazine was much appre- 
ciated. Although some of the conclu- 
sions drawn were faulty because of the 
necessity for generalization and simpli- 
fication, it was, on the whole, a very 
accurate picture. . . . 

A little more emphasis on the fact 
that this is an intensely American com- 
munity, with American buying and 
thinking habits might have been 
brought out. 

We would like to correct one mis- 
statement of fact and to point to one 
statement that might be misconstrued. 

In the box rate on page 36 you list- 
ed, in error, KAHU's one-hour, one- 
time rate, as $22. That is the rate for 
one quarter hour, one-time, Class A. 
Our one-hour, Class A, one-time rate, 
local and national, is $55. We would 
appreciate a correction. 

Then on page 58, you concluded the 
paragraph on KAHU with the state- 
ment that "sponsors are local." A less- 
than-meticulous reader might infer that 
our sponsors are drawn from the com- 
munity of Waipahu. Not so. Our spon- 
sors are local in the sense that they 
are located mostly on the island of 
Oahu, where more than 70% of the 
population lives — some 325,000 of 
them. Our primary audience is a rural 
audience, it is true. But the figures 
show nearly 100,000 rural residents — 
no small local market. KAHU ranks 
first in this area in listening, and has a 
high listening rating in the city of 
Honolulu. We maintain that our 1.000 
waits puts us in the regional market 
here, instead of being a purely local 
station. 

Curtis Butler 
Station Manager 
KAHU 
Hawaii 
(Please turn to page 98) 



14 



SPONSOR 



28.1% more $$$ 

National advertisers spent 
28.1% more dollars to spon- 
sor local programs on KSII 
in 1952 than in all of 1051. 

KSD's programs are valua- 
ble advertising properties! 

For information concerning 
currently available shows 
and time segments? call or 
write 



KSD 



THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH RADIO STATION 

5000 WATTS ON 550 KC DAY AND NIGHT 

National Advertising Representative: FREE & PETERS, INC. 

23 FEBRUARY 1953 15 






AGAIN, RCA sets a record in UHF technical 
leadership— by delivering to KPTV the entire UHF 
transmitter plant that put the FIRST commercial 
UHF signals on the air. 

Out of the experimental field into the practical, 
RCA transmitter-antenna combinations like those 
shown here make UHF planning a practical reality. 
They enable you to obtain the most coverage at 
minimum investment. 



RCA UHF PYLON ANTENNA. The high-gain TV antenna that includes a 
vertical beam-tilt arrangement — enabling you to cover specific areas more 
effectively. Horizontal radiation pattern of the Pylon is virtually circular. 




10-KW TYPE TTU-IOA (FOR ERP* TO 270 KW). Thi» UHF trans- 
mitter, and a UHF Pylon Antenna, will produce from 240 to 
270 lew ERP on channels 1 4 to 83. The combination is capable of 
serving almost any metropolitan area with strong signals. Type 
TTU- 1 OA is designed for straight-line or block "U" arrangements. 

'Effective Radiated Power 




jr example, in low-power operation, RCA's low- 
>st 1-kw UHF transmitter and a high-gain Pylon 
ntenna combination is the most economical 
loice. Or, if you require higher power, RCA's 
LO-kw" UHF and a high-gain Pylon combination 
"iproacbes the ultimate in useful coverage. 

In addition to transmitter-antenna combinations, 
CA also has the UHF accessories you need to go 
on air"; transmitter monitoring equipment, trans- 



mission line fittings, towers, consoles, UHF loads 
and wattmeters, Filterplexers, etc. Everything is 
"systems matched" to work together for maximum 
performance. All equipment is available from ONE 
responsible transmitter manufacturer — RCA. 

Make sure YOU get your UHF equipment when 
you need it. Your RCA Broadcast Sales Representa- 
tive is ready to take your order — and show you what 
you need to go UHF at lowest cost. 



1Q gj3 gj 




^ 



■JiiUJJI 



l-KW TYPE TTU-IB (FOR ERP* TO 27 KW). This transmitter 
and a UHF Pylon Antenna, can develop from 24 to 17 kw ERP 
on any channel, 1 4 to 83. TTU- 1 B is self-contained and all air- 
cooled. If is well suited as a driver for a high-power amplifier. 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 




ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT 







Top Programming! 
Top Salesmen! 





HT 



NORMAN ROSS 

The dean and leader of Chicago disc 
jockeys, on the air daily from 6:00-7:55 
. and 11:30-11:55 a.m. 




MARY MERRYFIELD 

And her "Radio Journal for Women" in 
a top-rated women's commentary heard 
daily from 12:00-12:25 p.m. 



ARBOGAST 

The zany comedian and his sidekick, 
Pete Robinson, broadcasting nightly 
from 10:15-10:45 p.m. in what has been 
voted "the best new Chicago radio 
program. 

Here are only three of the Quality programs on the Quality radio 
station in Chicago, selling the Middle West every day for scores 
of happy advertisers. 

Yes, Some Spots are Better than Others 

sP ots are Q/| 








■ 



\Yxo*e 



Chicago 

REPRESENTED BY NBC SPOT SALES 




18 



SPONSOR 




New and renew 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



1. 



2. 



3. 



4. 



New on Television Netivorks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Admiral Corp 


Erwin Wasey 


Du Mont 34 


Colden Cloves Finals; F 9 pm to concl; 6 Mar only 


Admiral Corp 


Erwin Wasey 


Du Mont 92 


Intercity Boxing Bouts; Th 9:30 pm to concl; 26 
Mar only 


American Tobacco 


BBDO 


CBS TV 65 


Private Secretary; Sun 7:30-8 pm; 1 Feb; 52 wks 


Anson Inc 


Grey Adv 


NBC TV 38 


Today; M-F 8:18-8:25 am seg; 9 Feb; 2 wks 


Charles Antell 


Television Adv Assoc 


ABC TV 64 


What's Your Bid?; Sat 7:30-8 pm; 14 Feb; 52 wks 


Bymart Inc 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


NBC TV 25 


There's One in Every Family; W 11:25 11:30 am; 
4 Feb; 13 wks 


Ford Motor Co 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


NBC TV 30 


Ford 5th Anniv Prog; M 9-11 pm; 6 June only 


General Mills 


Tatham Laird 


NBC TV 32 


Ding Dong School; F telecast of M-F 10-10:30 am 
show; 6 Mar; 13 wks 


lnt'1 Silver Co 


Young & Rubicam 


NBC TV 


Today; M-F 7-9 am; partic various days; 30 Apr; 


Knomark Mfg Co 


Emil Mogul 


NBC TV 62 


9 progs 
Kate Smith Show; alt T 4:45-5 pm seg; 10 Feb: 
no. wks not available 


Procter & Camble 


Compton 


CBS TV 60 


Garry Moore Show; T, W, F 1:30-1:45 segs of 
daily 1:30-2 pm show; 10 Feb; 10 wks 


River Brand Rice Mills 


Donahue & Coe 


Du Mont 


Paul Dixon Show; W 3:30-3:40 pm seg; 11 Feb; 

13 wks 
Ding Dong School; Th telecast of M-F 10-10:30 am 

show; 5 Feb; 13 wks 


Scott Paper Co 


|. Walter Thompson 


NBC TV 37 


Sunbeam Corp 


Perrin-Paus 


NBC TV 13 


Window on Washington; Sun 5:45-6 pm; 18 |an; 
52 wks 


Wine Corp of America 


Weiss & Celler 


CBS TV 50 


Bill Cullen Show; Th 11:15-11:30 pm; 12 Feb; 
13 wks 


Wine Corp of America 


Weiss & Celler 


ABC TV 190 


News of Tomorrow; M-Th 10-10:15 am; 9 Feb; 
52 wks 



Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



Firestone Tire & Rubber 
Co 



AGENCY 



Sweeney & James 



STATIONS PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

NBC TV 66 Voice of Firestone; M 8:30-9 pm; 18 Apr; 52 wks 



New National Spot Television Business 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT 


AGENCY 


STATIONS-MARKET 


CAMPAIGN, start, duration 


American Maize Prods 


Amazo instant 
desserts 


Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY 


Scattered mkts 


Partic home ec shows, movies 


B. B. Pen Co 


BB-Rol-Rite 


Roy S. Durstine, LA 


1 1 stns in 8 Midwest 
mkts: Chi, Detroit, 
Cleve, Cinci, Indi- 
anapolis, Milw, Mpls, 
St. Louis 


One-min film anncts; st 15 
Feb; 14 wks 


John Irving Shoe Co 


Women's shoes 


Product Services, NY 


4 cities, Detroit, Wash- 
ington, Chi, Phila; 
10 more mkts to be 
added soon 


Partic live progs; st Feb; 13 
wks or longer 


Lewal Industries 


Instant-Dip silver 
cleaner 


Lawrence C. Cumbin- 
ner, NY 


9 stns in 3 mkts: 
NY, Chi, Phila 


5 partic wkly, daytime shows; 
st )an; 13 wks or longer 


Mennen Co 


Men's toiletries 


Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY 


TV stns in NY, Phila, 
Washington, DC (in 
addition to mkts 
already used) 


Newscasts; prog segs; st Feb; 
to run indefinitely 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Roy Alderman 
Frank W. Berrien 
Don Blauhaut 
Robert Bowerman 



McCann-Erickson, NY, vp 
Ruthrauff & Ryan. NY, acct exec 
Peck Adv, NY, radio-TV dir 
KPRC-TV, Houston, exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, mgr Cinci office 

Picard Adv, NY, acct exec 

Raymond Spector, NY, dir radio-TV 

Boone & Cummings, Houston, hd radio-TV dept 



In next issue: New and Renewed an Radio Networks. New National Spot Radio Business, 
National Broadcast Sales Executives, Sponsor Personnel, New Agency Appointments 







Numbers niter names 
refer to \ eie and Re- 
new category 

Robert Debnam (4) 
Lester Friedman (4) 
Win slow H. Case (4) 
H. G. Slender (4) 
IT m. II. Lewis Jr. (4) 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



19 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



\ew and renew 



4. 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Charles Bowes 
Harvey L. Cary 
Winslow H. Case 

Frank L. Chipperfield 
Betty Conway 
Robert C. Debnam 
Lloyd Durant 
lames P. Ellis 
Roderick W. Fletcher 

Henry Frankel 
Lester A. Friedman 
Henry Cerstenkorn 
Edwin J. Heaney 
lack Herrick 
David P. Hornaday 

Arnold lohnson 
Milton H. Klein 
William H. Lewis |r. 

Bernard Lubar 

Cal |. McCarthy 
Marie Meighan 
Jim Meltzer 
William Mullane 
Arthur Napoleon 
Ceorge O'Leary 
Florence Page 
Lawson Paynter 
Frederick N. Polangin 
Alfred |. Roby |r. 
|on Ross 

Wells W. Spence 
William C. Stannard 
H. Gilbert Stender 
Herbert |. Stiefel 
Sylvan Taplinger 
|ohn A Thomas 



Ruthrauff & Ryan, LA, branch mgr 
Ralph H. Jones, Cinci, sect exec 
Campbell Ewald, NY, sr vp, creative dir 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, media exec 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY, space estimator 

Brisacher, Wheeler & Staff, SF, acct exec 

Compton, NY, TV comml prodn mgr 

Kudner, NY, radio-TV dept 

Ayres & Assoc, Lincoln, Neb, acct exec 

Jerry Fairbanks, NY, acct exec 
Brisacher, Wheeler & Staff, SF, copy dir 
Raymond R. Morgan, Hywd, sis mgr 
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co, NY, mktg dept 
Hoffman Radio Corp, LA, publicity dir 
Dannen Mills, St, Joseph, Mo, adv mgr 

NBC, Chi, net radio & TV sis serv mgr 

KLAC-TV, Hywd, opers mgr 

Benton & Bowles, NY, acct exec. Instant Maxwell 
House 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, asst dir radio & TV con- 
tinuity 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY vo 

Joseph Katz Co, Bait, media consultant 

Antrim Short, Hywd, TV dept 

Mullane Adv, Detroit, owner 

Biow, NY, hd TV comml prodn dept 

Simmonds & Simmonds, Chi, vp 

Benton & Bowles, NY, space buyer 

Erwin Wasey, NY, chg TV copy 

Hutchins Adv Co, Phila, acct exec 

McCann-Enckson, NY, acct exec 

KALI, Pasadena, acct exec 

McCann-Eiickson. NY, acct exec 

J. Walter Thompson. Canada, exec 

Benton & Bowles, NY, acct exec, Crosley 

Peck Adv, NY, vp & acct exec 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY, talent & prog buyer 

BBDO, NY. acct exec, memb plans bd 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Charles Bowes Adv, LA, owner (new agency) 
Allen & Reynolds, Omaha, acct exec 
Cunningham & Walsh, NY, vp chg radio & TV on 

Liggett & Myers acct 
Joseph Katz Co, Baltimore, dir of media 
Smith, Hagel & Snyder, NY, media buyer 
Same, vp 

Biow Co, NY, TV creative superv 
Same, hd new film prodn dept 
Same, but in Ayres' new St. Joseph, Mo, branch 

office 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, dir new prog, talent devel 
Same, vp 

Own agency, 668 S. Coronado St, LA 
Morey, Humm & Johnstone, NY, mdsg dept 
Robert J. Black, LA, acct exec 
Ayres & Assoc, new St. Joseph, Mo, branch office, 

acct exec 
Needham, Louis & Brorby, Chi, radio-TV facils dir 
Fennell Adv, Hywd, dir prodns 
Same, vp 



Same, dir radio & TV continuity dept 

I 1 

Ellington, NY, vp & acct exec 
Byrde, Richard & Pound, NY, space & time buye 
Irvin Rose, Hywd, radio-TV dir 
Ruse & Urban, Detroit, vp I agency merger) 
Same, Hywd office, superv TV comml prodn 
Frank E. Duggan, Chi, exec vp, acct exec 
Ross Roy, NY, dir of media 
Ewell & Thurber, NY, mgr radio & TV prodn 
Fuller & Smith & Ross, NY, sr acct exec 
Same, vp 

Fennell Adv, Hywd, acct exec 
Same, vp 

Harold F. Stanfield, Montreal, dir mktg 
Same, vp 

Bhine-Thompson, NY, sr acct superv 
Hirshon-Carfield, NY, dir radio-TV dept 
Ewell 6 Thurber, NY, dir radio & TV 



, 



5. 



Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



CHUB, Nanaimo, B.C., Canada, new Toronto rep Stephens & 
Towndrow 

CJAV. Port Alberni, B.C., new Toronto rep Stephens & Town- 
drow 

KLBS, Houston, new natl rep Everett-McKinney 

KRON-TV, S.F., power incr from 14.5 kw to 100 kw, eff 14 
Feb 

KS|0, San Jose, Cal, new natl rep Wm. C. Rambeau 

KSJV, Sanger, Cal, call letters changed to KBIF 

KSLO, Opelausas, La, new ABC Radio affil eff 15 Feb 

KTHS, Little Rock, Ark, prev located Hot Springs, Ark, st 
opers with new 50 kw power 1 Apr; CBS Radio affil eff 
15 June (replacing KLRA, Little Rock); Henry B. Clay, 
exec vp & gen mgr (photo at left) 

KTIP, Porterville, Cal, new ABC Radio affil eff 15 Feb 



WDEF, Chattanooga, NBC Radio affil eff 7 Apr 

WENR-TV, Chicago, call letters changed to WBKB eff 12 Feb 

WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C, power incr from 16.72 kw to 
100 kw 

WCN, Chicago, power incr from 29 kw to 316 kw eff 1 Oct 

WCRD, Crand Rapids, Mich, new natl rep Cill-Perna 

WHAS-TV, Louisville, power incr from 50 kw to 316 kw; 
change from channel 9 to 1 1 ; ef f 7 Feb 

WHBF, Rock Island. Ill, CBS Radio affil eff 1 July (replaces 
WQUA, Moline in area) 

WJZ, N.Y., (AM, FM, TV), call letters changed to WABC 

WTAC, Flint, Mich, new ABC Radio affil eff 15 Mar 

WTTC(TV), Washington, D. C, new natl rep Blair-TV 

WWW. Fairmont, W. Va., new ABC Radio affil eff 15 Mar 



4 



Numbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
neu < ategory 

John 1. Thomas (4) 
Lawson l'a\ nter < I ) 
Cal .1. McCarthy I 1 1 



//. /. Stiefel 


( 1) 


llrnn ( ln\ 


(5) 


Florence Page 


i 1) 


Bernard Lubar 


l 1.) 


Lloyd Durant 


Mi 


S\h mi Taplinger 


( h 


llrnn Frankel 


1 n 



20 




RADIO -10.4 HOURS 



Radio — 10.4 hrs. per day 




Television - — 2.6 hrs. per day 




Daily Newspapers — 1.2 hrs. per day 




Magazines — 0.79 hrs. per day 



I 



Iowa's 806,000 
families spend more 

than TWICE as much 

time with RADIO 
as with all other 
media COMBINED! 



Weekly Newspapers — 0.17 hrs. per day 



WHO 



and WW 11V continues to be 
Iowa's BEST ADVERTISING BUY! 



Send for the FACTS TODAY! 

These facts are taken from the 1952 Iowa 
Radio-Television Audience Survey conducted 
by Dr. F. L. Whan of Wichita University, and 
his staff. The new Survey again proves that 
radio is by all odds Iowa's best advertising 
value . . . and that WHO continues to be 
Iowa's best advertising buy! 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



WIKI® 

' >r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. *A. Loy.et, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC 

National Representative* 



21 







WHEN 

YOU 

CHOOSE 

CANADA'S 

FIRST 

STATION. 



&#?*></ on /dfcs-f &Af figures. 
li +Uc U.S., see Weed *G>. 

Im Canada , Alt-Can*!*. 




ft pit 



Chester fi. Gifford 



President 
Schick, Inc. 



The president of Schick, Inc., Chester G. Gifford, has come up 
with a couple of fresh reasons for an advertiser to use TV. He told 
sponsor last week: "Everyone is aware of the value of TV as a means 
of demonstrating your product to potential users. In selling electric 
shavers this is a must. But what only a few manufacturers seem to 
realize is that with the high rate of turnover in the nation's retail 
sales force, television can be very handy in training salesmen. As a 
result of their having watched our commercials on TV, we feel con- 
fident that when a prospect walks into a store to look at a Schick 
shaver he will get a good demonstration from the sales clerk." 

Another Gifford observation regarding his firm's two CBS TV 
programs (Crime Syndicated on alternate weeks, and one-third of 
the Jackie Gleason Show I should interest advertisers whose problems 
include winning retail outlets. 

"When one of our salesmen used to hit a city such as Kalamazoo 
with proofs of our big ads in, say, Life, he would have to explain the 
magazine's circulation in Kalamazoo, readers per copy, amount of 
time people spent with the book, etc. Now we find that the salesman's 
job is cut out for him, because, although both our TV programs are 
network, the local dealer in Kalamazoo considers it to be a local 
effort to back him up because he views the program on his local 
station WKZO-TV. Thus we get top network production plus local 
impact.'' For this combination Schick earmarks $1,700,000 of a 
$2,500,000 ad budget to TV. 

Having a solid sales background. Gifford is very much aware of the 
value of local impact. He sold a wide variety of products during de- 
pression years, joined Schick as Midwest regional sales manager in 
1940, and became overseer of all Schick service station operations in 
the Midwest and West in 1942. He was in the armed services from 
1943 to 1945, and was designated Eastern regional manager for 
Schick upon his return to mufti. 

In L948 he became general sales manager of Swank, Inc. (men's 
jewelry), advanced to vice president of the firm before returning to 
Schick as executive v. p. in November 1950. He was named president 
of Schick in April 1952 when his brother. Kenneth C. Gifford, 
became chairman of the board. * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 



W JBK Guarantees You 

RATE PROTECTION ! 



i 



YOU PAY FOR ONLY 250 WATTS 



on continuing contracts placed now 

YOU'LL GET 10,000 
v WATT COVERAGE 

when we boost our power 

Now . . . more than ever . . . you get 
{ more than your money's worth on 
WJBK! Buy at the 250 watt rate now 
. . . pay no more when our new 10,000 
watt rates go into effect. This rate 
protection alone is reason enough why 
the new WJBK is a radio buy you 
can't pass by! 



GESH 



Y/Jii&> 



etroit 



A STORER STATION 

Tops in MUSIC, NEWS and SPORTS 

National Sales. Mgr., TOM HARKER, 488 Madison, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-7690 

Repreiented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY 

23 FEBRUARY 1953 23 




that counts 

Look at 
prosperous, 

progressive/ 

Mobile 




. . . and don't overlook 

0X& 



CALL 



Adam Young, Jr. 

National Representative 

or F. E. Busby 

Ccncral Manager 



ON THE DIAL 710 






Mobile, Alabama 



IVetc developments on SPONSOR stories 

"TV and psychiatry boom Mogen 
David" 

26 January 1953, p. 28 

SlthlOCtl Wine Corp. steps up air media 
advertising 

Dipping into its 1953 advertising budget of $1.4 million — about 
$100,000 up from 1952 — Mogen David this month added two more 
network shows to its 1953 radio-TV line-up. On ABC Radio the 
company began sponsorship of News of Tomorrow over 198 stations 
starting 9 February (10:00 to 10:15 p.m., Monday through Thurs- 
day) ; program was bought for 52 weeks. Format includes comments 
by Gordon Frazer, New York newsman, and by ABC correspondents 
throughout the world. Mogen David's most recent TV buy : The Bill 
CuIIen Show, 11:15 to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays on CBS TV, for 52 
weeks, beginning 12 February. 

The spring 1953 air campaign — radio and TV combined — will 
cost Mogen David more than $550,000. Of the annual ad budget, 
the biggest chunk, $500,000, is allotted to TV; radio comes in a close 
second with $350,000. Marvin Mann. v. p. of Weiss & Geller. agency 
for Mogen David, sums up client reasoning for the new TV buy as 
follows: "There was an immediate sales response to TV that hadn't 
been felt in other media. We knew then we were going to concen- 
trate the ad budget on TV as long as it brought such results." 

See: "Movies on the Air" 

ISSUC: 8 September 1952, p. 38 

Subject: MGM reverses its policy on TV ap- 
pearances by its stars 

Until winter 1952 MGM maintained a policy of thumbs down 
whenever its contract talent asked permission to appear on TV. Then, 
last December, it tried showing teaser scenes from "Jeopardy" on 
New England TV stations just before its release. Results were so 
good the long-standing policy was changed. Sy Seadler. MGM adver- 
tising manager, told sponsor: "We now permit our stars to appear 
on TV — though for promotional reasons only." 

Never one for half-way measures. MGM (through its agency, Dona- 
hue & Coe) jumped in with both feet to launch its current new re- 
lease, "Above and Beyond." Biggest indication of the changed 
philosophy was showing of teasers from the picture on Ed Sullivan s 
Toast of the Town, CBS TV. on 11 January. And Robert Taylor, 
star of the picture, was a guest on the show. 

Since exhibitors share cost of advertising MGM films, the company 
doesn't formulate an over-all national policy. Sy Seadler feels, how- 
ever, that increased use of air media is likely. 

Coinciding with the film's premiere on 29 January in New \ ork 
City, MGM bought a half-hour WJZ-TV movie promotion package. 
It included 50 announcements of varying lengths (10-, 20-, and 60- 
second ) , and coverage of the premiere, at which co-star Eleanor 
Parker appeared. The combined radio-TV campaign was master- 
minded by MGM's v. p. in charge of advertising, publicity, and 
exploitation. Howard Deitz. and Donal & Coe's Carl Rigrod, direc- 
tor of radio and TV for the agency's motion-picture division. 

Largest movie promotion package on WJZ-TV to date is the 125 
10-second announcement series advertising the mid-February pre- 
miere of United Artists' "Moulin Rouge." WJZ-TV's package promo- 
tions to the Hollywood companies, which include as many as 20' 
station announcements plugging the forthcoming premiere telecasts, 
cost from $4,000 to $10,000 depending upon frequency of the an- 
nouncements for which the individual company contracts. * * * 

SPONSOR 



TV Time Buyers! 

Ljou can keep aood compcinu on 

CHANNEL 73 

Jti Ljounadtown, \yhlo 



NBC SHOWS 



Kukla, Fran & Ollie" 

RCA 
"Hallmark Theater" 

Hall Bros. 
"Bill Henry" 

Sunbeam Corp. 
"Roy Rogers" 

General Foods 
"Red Skslton" 

P & C 
"Mr. Peeoer*" 

Reynolds Metals 
"TV Playhouse" 

Philco 
"TV Playhouse" 

Goodyear 
"The Doctor" 

P & C 
"Howdy Doody" 

Luden's 

"Those Two" 

P & G 
"What's My Name" 

Speidel 
"What's My Name" 

Crosley 
"Voice of Firestone" 

Firestone 
"Robert Montqomery" 

American Tobacco 
"Robert Montgomery" 

S. C. Johnson Co. 
"Welcome Travelers" 

Ekco 
"Welcome Travelers" 

P & C 
"Short Short Dramas" 

Pepsi Cola 
"Circus Hour" 

Buick 
"Milton Berle" 

Texaco 
"Fir°«'d° Theater" 

P & G 
"Circle Theater" 

Armstrong 
"Two for the Money" 

P. Lorillard 
"Embassy Club" 

P. Lorillard 
"Bob Considine" 

Mutual ot Omaha 
"I Married Joan" 

General Electric 
"Scott Mu-jic Hall" 

Scott Co. 
"Kra»* TV Theater" 

Kraft 
"Short Short Dramas" 

Pepsi Cola 
"You Bet Your Life" 

DeSoto-Plymouth 
"Martin Kane" 

U. S- Tobacco 
"Welcome Travelers" 

Nash Kelvinator 
"RCA V=c*or Show" 

RCA Victor 
"Life of Riley" 

Cult 
"Big Story" 

American Cig. & Cig. 
"Big Story" 

Simonize 
"Cavnlcade of Sports" 
Gillette 



PRESENT LIST 
OF SPONSORS 



"Greatest Fights" 

Cheesebrough Mfg. 
"Show of Shows" 

R. j. Reynolds 
"Show of Shows" 

Griffin, SOS, Benrus 
"Show of Shows'' 

Prudential 
"Show of Shows" 

Fink & Lehn 
"Hit Parade" 

American Tobacco 
"Camel News Caravan" 

R. |. Reynolds 
"Kate Smith" 

P & G 
"Kate Smith" 

James Lee 
"Kate Smith" 

Block Drug 
"Kate Smith" 

Nestle's 
"Kate Smith" 

Minute Maid 
"Kate Smith" 

Simonize 
"Kate Smith" 

Gerber 
"Dragnet" 

Chesterfield 
"Dinah Shore" 

Chevrolet 
"All Star Revue" 

Pet Milk & Johnson & Johnson 
"Vacationland America" 

Fram Corp. 
"Cavalcade of America" 

DuPont 
"Aldrich Family" 

Campbell Soups 
"Kate Smith" 

Clidden Paint 
"Ford Theater" 

Ford Motor Co. 



(^ali 



NATIONAL SPOTS 

Galen Laboratories 

Bulova Watch Company 

Rival Dog Food 

Kool Cigarettes 

Eun Oil Company 

Pio Wines 

Serta Mattresses 

Gilbert's Furniture Co. 

Pilsner Brewing Company 

Salada Tea 

Crosley 

Alliance Mfg. Co. 

LOCAL Spots 

Stambaugh-Thompson Company (Hardware) 

Harwell's — Men's Store 

Giant Bargain Center 

Isaly Dairy Company 

Powers Jewelers 

Wilkins-Leonard Hardware Co. 

Bargain Port 

Record Shop 

Al Wagner Motor Sales 

Printz Company — Men's Store 

DuPont Paint Company 

Record Rendezvous 

Brody Shoe Store 

King's Jewelry Store 

Sackett Card Co. 

James A. Henderson (Chevrolet Co.) 

Lyon Gas Disposal Co. 

Programs 

"Kit Carson" — Coca Cola Bottling Co. 
"Laurel & Hardy" — Golden Age Bev. Co. 
"Boston Blackie" — Golden Age Bev. Co. 
"Telesports Digest" — Renner Brewing Co. 
"Feature Theater" — King's Jewelry Co. 
"Western Serial" — Golden Age Bev. Co. 
"Madison Square Garden" — Burlchardt Beer 
30" Film — Schwebel Banking Co. 



HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 

for ^TvailcLoiliti 



lie 6 



101 West Boardman St., Youngstown, Ohio 
Phone 3-4121 

SERVING AMERICA'S 30th 
MOST POPULOUS AREA 

• * * • 

NBC AFFILIATE 

1000 FOOT TOWER ULTIMATELY 







The pundits who solemnly explained 
that television's popularity was largely 
based on its '"novelty" may now go to 
the rear of the class. 

Today some five years after the novelty 
has worn off, Americans continue to find 
television as irresistible as easy money, 
as compelling as a thunderstorm. And 
the pattern of their devotion is as plain 
as the forest on the rooftops. 

Families with sets devote more time to 
television than ever before — an average 



last year of four hours and forty-nine 
minutes a day. This is more time than 
the American family has ever given to 
any spare-time pursuit. 

Though not all areas yet have access to 
television, one television program wins, 
week after iveek, the largest audience ever 
garnered by any medium in advertising 
history- 40,000,000 people! 

That program, of course, is carried over 
CBS Television, as are most of the most 
popular nighttime television programs. 



Indeed, in the nation's leading markets. 
where audiences have a choice of what to 
look at, CBS Television keeps winning the 
highest average audience of any network. 
Add to a pattern of leadership the Fact 
that CBS Television delivers these great 
audiences at the lowest cost per thousand 
. . . and it becomes clear why advertisers 
use more time on CBS Television than on 
any other network. 

CBS TELEVISION 




! 



No. I of a Series 



Anon) mou- People who add up to well-known 
Bm> i ii ^ Power in the area of 




Why Do 200,000 of them like Wrestling? 




• The 6,000 people who jam 
the Minneapolis Auditori- 
um Tuesday nights are just 
a corporal's guard com- 
pared to the more than 
200,000 at ringside in their 
homes-via WCCO-TV. 



Why do they like wrestling? 
A big part of the answer is 
in the skill of WCCO-TV 
sports announcers who (a) 
know the sport (b) know 
the viewers needs and tastes 
and (c) talk just enough — 
authoritatively, on what is 
going on in the ring. 

It takes skill and experi- 



ence to do good sports re- 
porting . . . like the skill 
and 15 years experience of 
Rollie Johnson, Sports Di- 
rector, in covering North- 
west sports. And his staff 
know their jobs . . . from 
ringside to camera to trans- 
mitter to Northwest homes 
. . . the job is done right . . . 
on WCCO-TV. 



wcco a 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

Nationally represented by FREE and PETERS 



RADIO.. .830 kc...50 kw and TELEVISION I 4.. .100 kw 
For dominant coverage of the Northwest Market 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 




SPOIOR evaluation of two 
key post-freeze problems 

Of paramount concern to advertisers and agencies today is how to plan 
ahead for stations now coming on the air in ever-increasing numbers. 
To help in your planning SPONSOR has gathered facts on two post-freeze 
problems: (1) the inevitable increase in audience competition and (2) t 811 



'■My- 

Hi 



1. 



Even a well-rated TV program 
may be a poor bet for future 



Big-time sponsors in TV are facing 
a new problem: How will their 
present shows stack up when one- 
station TV markets fill up ivith new 
outlets and all-out rivalry starts? 
Latest TV research, notably the 
Nielsen studies in the nine fully 
competitive TV markets in the 
U.S., offers many new clues, spon- 
sor's analytical study of the prob- 
lem of future competition reveals 
that TV network ratings will drop 
as competitive pace steps up. How 
big a drop depends on your show. 
Story starts p«»<* 31) 



2. 



UHF: What it is and how it 
differs from VHF television 



sponsor went to timebuyers, asked 
them what they wanted to know 
about UHF, then got answers from 
stations, engineers, and scientific 
and market sources. To sum it up: 
UHF works well but still has some 
kinks which have to be ironed out. 
Picture quality is the same as 
VHF, however. Besides watching 
new set sales, agencies must check 
conversion rate in UHF markets 
which get fringe VHF signal. One 
big question: Will better transmit- 
ters reduce dead spots in reception? 

Slot*!/ sttirts naqv 32 



.v.v.v.;.x-:-:-:-. . 



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23 FEBRUARY 1953 



29 



— 



Gulf's "We the People" 

Typical National NTI rating 24.5 

Comparative NTI 9-City rating- 11.0 

Percent drop between National, 9-City 47% 



Conclusion: "We The People" jailed to attract sizable audiences 
when it faced tough competition in nine U.S. cities where multi- 
station rivalry nine exists. Y&R, Gulfs agency, recommended that 
show be dropped, since its potential for future, when multi-station 
markets will be commonplace, was weak. Show did fairly well in 
one-station markets, which boosted national rating to point where it 
disguised this long-range fault. Show was given the axe 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllll!ll!!'!!l!ll I Il!i:itllllli;illl!i1l,i|l!llllli!llt.!!::,!i!l llll mini 

GENUINE STRENGTH: Block Drug's "Danger" 

Typical National NTI rating 23.5 

Comparative NTI 9-City rating- 20.9 

Percent drop between National, 9-City 11% 



Conclusion: Unlike ''We The People," the NTI 9-City ratings on 
Block's TV thriller are almost as good in competitive areas as they 
are in the entire U.S. Drop-off of 11% is better than all-show average 
drop of 14% which occurs when multi-station ratings are checked 
against national picture. Block considers "Danger" to be a good bet 
for long-range rivalry in big-time TV, even though U.S. rating was 
lower than Gulfs 24.5 national Nielsen rating level 

•Nielsen 9-City TV ratings arc specially computed for the nine multi-station TV markets : 
N.Y., Wash., Phila., Dctr.. Oleve.. Balto.. Cine!., Columbus. Each has ai least three 
TV outlets and many have at least four TV stations on the air. 

iiiimiiiimiiitniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




1. Will competition kill your show? 



Ladio-style rivalry will come to TV as one-slation markets disappear. 
Those neiv standards are now being used to judge long-range values 



j.'ls East as the old problems of TV's 
cramped size are being solved by the 
lifting of the FCC freeze, new prob- 
lems are being created. One of the 
most formidable: 

In the predictable future, big one- 
station markets will rapidly become 
multi-station markets. Networks will 
be in an era of radio-like program 
competition. What's going to happen 
to network TV program ratings and 
audience sizes when this inter-network 
competition really gets going? 



30 



A few farsighted advertisers — like 
P&G, Lipton, Colgate, Lever Bros., and 
General Foods, to name a few — have 
put this question to their agencies. In 
turn, a growing number of ad agen- 
cies — like Young & Rubicam, Benton 
& Bowles, McCann-Erickson, and Foote 
Cone & Belding — have made careful 
slide-rule journeys into the competi- 
tive future of TV. 

Already, there are definite clues as 
to what will happen when network TV 
rivalries approach those of radio webs. 



The big fad: TV ratings will drop. 

Proof of this can be found in a now- 
standard addition to A. C. Nielsen's 
regular national TV ratings. This is 
the Nielsen Popularity Rating, based 
on what happens in a sort of "Inside 
USA-TV." Ratings are figured sep- 
arately — within the total U. S. data — 
for the nine cities in which there are 
now at least three competing TV out- 
lets. These nine cities are: New York, 
Chicago. Philadelphia. Washington, 
Detroit, Cleveland. Baltimore, Cincin- 

SPONSOR 



na'.i, and Columbus, Ohio. They rep- 
resent about 50% of the total TV 
homes in the U. S. 

Since 1950, when they first ap- 
peared, the Nielsen Popularity Ratings 
have shown rating levels which are 
enough to jar the complacency of any 
adman who thin'.s his TV show will 
probably do as well in the future as it 
does today. 

When a nine-city Nielsen TV rating 
is compared with the rating of the same 
show in the national NTI lists, the nine- 
city figure is almost invariably lower. 
The drop is sizable; it averages about 
14% for all network TV shows, day 
and night combined. Individually, 
some shows plunge as much as 50% 
below national levels when they're op- 
erating in the competitive environ- 
ment of multi-station cities. 

There's no great secret behind thi* 
rating drop. Half the TV homes in the 
U. S. receive TV programs which have 
little or no simultaneous TV competi- 
tion. This is due to the fact that s'n- 
gle-station cities, even today, account 
for about every third TV market. 

More than 40 U. S. cities have just 
one TV station. Of these 40 one-sta- 
tion cities, 35 contain over 100.000 
families; 14 contain over 300.000 fam- 
ilies; three contain over 500,000 fami- 
lies. Viewers in these cities have a 
simple choice of TV programs: Take 
what's on the single channel, or turn 
the set off and listen to radio. 

Concern for TVs future: TV is 

still being hampered b\ the one-sta- 



stains report 



tion market situation to I i . . But, v e l- 
in.'ormed TV network and station rep 
sources told sponsor that the major 
TV single-station market - — like Pitts- 
burgh, St. Louis, New I rie us. Johns- 
town, Charlotte. V amp is, Seattle, San 
Diego, and others — should be multi- 
station markets, radio-style, 1>\ the 
middle of 1954. A year later, they'll 
just be a memory. Simultaneous tele- 
casting in all major markets will be 
a reality by the end of 1955. 

Of course, network time clearances 
will be easier. Kinescope schedules — 
in which time slots on perhaps half of 
a show s station line-up never matched 
those in the cable-linked, competitive 
markets — will disappear without lam- 
entation. But with the disappearance 
of the kine headaches will come the 
new problems of genuine program com- 
petition all over the country. 

Even pioneer TV advertisers, who 
often have jealously guarded their 
good lime slots in one-stafon market-, 
may be in for a surprise. Such pio- 
neer shows as Westinghouse's Studio 
One and Kraft Theatre may suddenly 
find themselves up against stiff compe- 
tition from a new TV channel that's 
just opened in the market. 

Single-station markets exert a con- 
siderable boost to the average TV pro- 
gram's rating. In the SPONSOR-Tele- 
Pulse spot film ratings chart in the 26 



January 1953 issue, for example. For- 
•ie got a whopping Tele- 
Pulse rating of 50.5% in New Or- 
leans, a large one-station market. In 
New York, a seven-station TV market 
with fell network representation, For- 
eign In'rigwi—stvA as good a- it \\a- 
in N e ' ' i le tn - got a rating of only 
L8.9' . i he omparative drop: 62.5' . 
Ibis is an extreme case. But the pat- 
tern is similar when true multi-station 
competition is weighed aj ainst the to- 
tal U.S., as pointed out above. 

Here are some typical examples of 
nine -city -versus -national TV ratings 
iToni Nielsen: 



SHOW 


Na" nal 
NTI 

37.8% 


9-C:ty 


°o Drop 


Lon? Ranger 


27.0° o 


28.5 


Kraft Th~atrs 


35.6 


27.3 


23.4 


Vo/c? of Firestone 


14.0 


8.2 


41 .5 


S'.uiio One 


28.3 


22.0 


22.? 


Danger 
Flainclothcsman 


23.5 
23.8 


20.9 
78.3 


-77.7 
-23.2 



It's obvious from these, and similar 
figures, that multi-station competition 
almosl invariabl) means lower ratings. 
However, the percentage drop isn't 
consistent with every show. For in- 
stance. Studio One in the chart above 
shows a drop of about 22%, somewhat 
higher than the usual all-show average 
drop of 14^ . But the recent We The 
People series showed a drop of 47% 
in the competitive nine cities as op- 
posed to its national rating (24.5 vs. 
{Please tarn to page 89) 



Effect of true competition on TV viewing is revealed in 9-city Nielsen data 

Tl audiences are highly selective when there's plenty to (house from. "Irma." fell off sharply during Schlitz show, rose Inter. 1\'BC Tl and 

Nielsen chart oj multi-station TV areas shows. CBS TV audience ABC. TV ran in a reverse pattern, with A BC TV hitting a big peak 

grew, lor instance, during "Mama" on 12 Dec. 1952. soared during during "Big Story. Such Vielsen charts cereal competitive strengths 




.20 Z5 30 35 '40 45 : 50 » &00 OS 



15 :» 5S 30' 35 40 45 '50 :55 1000 05 10 15 10 25 10 35 40 '45 50 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



31 




\\ hat is IHF? As shown in diagram below, UHF refers to one 
portion of broadcasting spectrum. I'HF waves differ from VHF 
only in that more UHF waves are generated each second, that is, 



the frequency is higher. Picture quality is the same. UHF band 
is wider than VHF; therefore, many more TV channels can be used. 
Picture above shows types of UHF home antennae developed by RCA 



1 What I imifoiyiTs want to knot 

For agencies seeking details on TV's hottest topic here are soil 



M. he eyes of everybody connected 
with broadcasting are on UHF these 
days but no one is taking a closer look 
than the timebuyer. 

With a new broadcast band open, he 
must not only watch figures on TV set 
growth like a hawk, but he must also 
weigh the extra complication of how 
many VHF sets have been converted 
to UHF reception. And, while he 
doesn't have a deep interest in the 
technicalities of UHF, he finds him- 
self bombarded with such terms as 
"ERP," "Klystron tube," and "yagi 
antennae." He hears conflicting reports 
about what UHF has done and what it 
can do in the future with better equip- 
ment and more know-how. 

To help timebuyers cut through the 



jungle of assorted facts sponsor first 
went to the timebuyers themselves to 
find out exactly what they wanted to 
know, sponsor discovered that, in 
addition to the obvious fact that time- 
buyers are interested in detailed mar- 
ket data, they also want to know ( 1 ) 
what the differences between UHF and 
VHF mean in terms of coverage; (2) 
whether they can roughly predict the 
rate at which VHF set owners will con- 
vert to UHF; (3) what UHF is. in 
layman's language. 

In gathering answers to timebuyers' 
questions, SPONSOR consulted engineers, 
spoke to new UHF station managers, 
examined scientific reports and checked 
figures on conversions and purchases 
of new TJHF sets. The answers will be 



summarized below in question-and- 
answer style, but, first, here's a thumb- 
nail sketch of the highlights: 

• There's no question but that UHF 
works. Nor can the consumer detect 
any difference between a UHF and 
VHF picture. 

• Like any electronic advance, UHF 
has kinks which must be ironed out. 
Generally speaking, UHF requires 
higher transmitter power than VHF, 
and engineers are working on ways of 
getting this higher power economically. 
One recent development in this field 
is the Klystron tube. Broadcasters and 
engineers are especially interested in 
finding out whether the Klystron tube 
as well as other higher-power trans- 
mitters can cut down "dead spots" 



^ RADIO BROADCASTINC 
ALTERNATING CURRENT. ETC. 



VARIOUS 



VHF TV 



CHANNELS 2-6 



FM. AMATEUR. 
GOVERNMENT, OTHERS 



VHF TV 



CHANNELS 7-13 



COVERNMENT, AMATEUR, METEOROLOCY, 
LAND MOBILE PHONE, CLIDE PATH, CITI-ZEN RA 

VHF^U-U HF 3* 



MECACYCLES 

32 



30 



54 



88 



174 



216 



3JJQ 



SPONSOR 




Can UHF signal an as far as \HF? As photo shows 
WKBNTV UHF signal is clear at 50 miles. UHF signals nor- 
mally will not go as far as VHF hut this ran be offset in many ivays 



Are converters available'.' Yes, and production is increas- 
ing. Crosley tuner, above, enables VHF set to receive all 83 UHF 
channels. One- and two-channel converters also are being made 



lllOllf I III 1 



i gisy-to-read explanations 



within a UHF station's primary cover- 
age or "A" area. 

• UHF fringe antenna installation is 
more critical than VHF. Dealers must 
become familiar with the particu- 
lar problems of UHF reception. How- 
ever, in its early days VHF also was a 
headache for servicemen and, today, 
most VHF installations are no problem 
to skilled servicemen. 

• As for UHF market growth, it's 
safe to say this: Where a UHF station 
is the only video outlet in a particular 
market and no outside VHF signals 
come in, consumer enthusiasm is high 
and TV set salesmen don't even have 
to open their mouths. Where the UHF 
market receives outside VHF signals, 
the situation is a bit more complex. 



status report 



The answer depends to a great extent 
on how satisfied each individual con- 
sumer is with his present VHF signal 
and how good the UHF signal is. I For 
some straight - from - the - horse's - mouth 
information on what UHF stations are 
doing to build audiences, see "Mr. 
Sponsor Asks," page 64.) 

Here's the full story on UHF in lay- 
man's terms and language: 

©. What is UHF? 

A. As you can see in the diagram at 
the bottom of these two pages, ultra 
high frequency is a name for a certain 
portion of the broadcasting spectrum. 
It runs from 300 to 3,000 megacycles 
( the number of waves broadcast each 
second). A megacycle is a million 
waves. The higher the frequency, the 
more waves per second. The TV band 
in UHF, the diagram shows, begins at 
470 megacycles and ends at 890 mega- 
cycles. 



As the diagram indicates, UHF 
waxes are just one of many kinds of 
waves. At the left hand side, you can 
see that the lower frequency waves are 
used for home electric current, radio 
broadcasting, and other services. As 
the number of waves increase per sec- 
ond ( and become smaller I . we reach 
the very high frequency or VHF por- 
tion of the spectrum, part of which has 
been used for some years now for com- 
mercial television channels. 

Q. Why is the UHF band in particu- 
lar being used for TV? 

A. It is obvious from the diagram 
that there is room for many channels 
in the UHF band. TV needs this room. 
A single TV channel takes up a lot of 
space in the broadcasting spectrum, 
much more than a radio station. For 
example, even assuming the radio fre- 
quencies were available for TV, it 
wouldn't be practical to use them. One 
TV channel alone would take up a 
band equivalent to the entire radio 
broadcasting band plus a lot more. 

It also is obvious from the diagram 
that the spectrum is quite crowded. 



UHF TV 



CHANNELS 14-83 



VARIOUS 

- UH F- 



RAOAR. LIGHT 
HEAT, X-RAYS. ETC 



470 



890 



3000 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



33 




As crowds in front of Portland store show, new 
UHF station KFTV excites sales. UHF sales 
have been better than in VHF's early days 



When it became apparent to the FCC 
and broadcasting industry that the 
VHF band didn't provide enough space 
for a truly national TV industry, it 
also became apparent that the most 
room for new TV channels was up in 
the ultra high frequencies. They would 
have liked to open up the section of 
the band that follows 216 megacycles 
l Channel 13). But. as the diagram 
shows, that part of the spectrum is tied 
up by the U. S. Government and mis- 
cellaneous services. 

The UHF TV hand has space for 70 
channels. Over the country as a whole, 
the band provides for 1,445 stations. 
Together with nearly 500 new VHF 
stations that can be put into operation, 
that makes a grand total of 2,053 sta- 
tions which can be accommodated by 
both VHF and UHF bands. This total 
includes more than 200 educational 
channels. Whether the band will be 
filled up is another question, but, at 
least, the room is there. 

Q' Are there any important differ- 
ences between UHF and VHF broad- 
casting? 

A. As we travel up the spectrum to 
higher frequencies and smaller waves, 
we find more of a tendency for the 
waves to travel in a straight line. This 
is a gradual thing. It doesn't begin 
suddenly at Channel 14, the lowest 
frequency UHF channel. The higher 
frequency waves will not "bend and 
fill" around obstructions, such as build- 
ings and hills, as well as the lower fre- 
quency waves. When you get up to 
the frequency of light, the wave really 
travels in a straight line. 



This difference can be explained in 
another way. Suppose we use an um- 
brella as an example of an obstruction. 
Now, if we generate a radio wave such 
as Marconi used to transmit across the 
Atlantic, the umbrella won't get in the 
way since Marconi's wave was more 
than half a mile in length. But when 
we get down to UHF-size waves we are 
dealing with wave lengths of a couple 
of feet or less. Obviously, something 
the size of an umbrella will be an ob- 
struction to transmission. 

The fact that smaller waves are like- 
ly to hit more obstructions than longer 
waves is just as true for stations in the 
VHF band. Channel 13 waves, for ex- 
ample, are affected more by foliage in 
the spring and summer than Channel 2 
waves are affected. 

When it comes to bigger obstructions 
like hills and tall buildings, we find 
that small, high-frequency waves cause 
"shadows." much like light causes 
shadows. This is just as true of VHF 
as it is of UHF, so apparently it's not 
something that can't be licked. How- 
ever, as frequencies increase, the 
shadows or dead spots become longer 
and "deeper."" making the signal 
strength weaker. 

John P. Taylor of RCA's engineer- 
ing products department reported that 
during his study of TV reception in 



Portland shortly after KPTV went on 
the air ( this was the first commercial 
test of UHF), he could almost predict 
the dead spots by standing on the hill 
where the transmitter antenna was lo- 
cated and picking out obstructions by 
sight. Taylor did not recommend this 
as standard engineering practice, of 
course, but he said it was a conveni- 
ent way of narrowing down possible 
areas of bad reception. It also sug- 
gests a rough way of picking out a 
good spot for a transmitting antenna. 

Q- Does all this mean that UHF 
coverage will not be as good as VHF? 

A. Not necessarily. In the first 
place, if the home antenna is in a di- 
rect line of sight with the transmitting 
antenna, there is no problem of ob- 
structions at all. Taylor reported that 
the Portland transmitting antennae, 
which are placed on a hill overlooking 
the city, practically look down the 
chimneys of most Portland homes. 
From a spot check, he estimated that 
KPTV will furnish good service to 
88% of the Portland trading area. 
Comparing this with a theoretical VHF 
station, he figured out that a VHF sig- 
nal would cover about 94%. The 94% 
figure was arrived at by assuming that 
VHF waves would fill in about half 
(Please turn to page 70) 



r 



Here's a TV set sales trend in UHF market 

South Bend's new UHF station. WSBT-TV, competes with fringe signals 
from Chicago and Kalamazoo. Figures gathered by station show that, in 
early days at least, converter sales top those of UHF-equipped sets 



Date 


No. of " 
stores 


Converters sold 
during week 


UHF-equipped 
sets 


Total UHF sets 
(cumulative) 


11/22/52 


13 


582 


573 


1,095 


11/29/52 


16 


243 


227 


1,565 


12/6/52 


16 


908 


318 


2,791 


12/13/52 


16 


7,463 


422 


4,676 


12/20/52 


16 


935 


328 


5,939 


12/27/52* 




1,481 


372 


7,792 


1/3/53 


15 


1,737 


217 


9,746 


1/10/53 


14 


1,141 


406 


11,193 


1/15/53 


2 


1,020 


71 


12,384 



Total 



9,510 



'Station went on air 22 December 



2,874 12,384 



"Totals as of 31 January are 20.500 



34 



SPONSOR 

For statements by UHF station managers, see page 64 Ik 




How a top Sears store 
uses radio .. 



sells iiien in morning, women in afternoon. 



Smart programing, station's interest in store problems help boost sales 



M. he myth that radio can't do a good, 
consistent job of selling for department 
stores has been exploded many times 
but never with a louder bang than in 
Tucson, Ariz. 

The Sears, Roebuck store in that 
city has been doing an effective job 
with radio selling for nearly seven 
years. This undoubtedly has been a 
factor in giving Edward B. Carmack, 
store boss for 20 years, a record as one 
of Sears' hottest local managers. Last 
year. Carmack ran off with every prize 
given by the mail-order firm for top 
performance in its 66th Anniversary 
Sale. 

Carmack's success cannot be broken 
down into any copy-book formula 



case history 



which lists five or 10 points on "How 
to sell department store goods on the 
radio." The Sears manager seems to 
have an inborn sense of what consti- 
tutes good air programs for selling his 
goods. But a hint may lie in his state- 
ment that: 

"Radio is becoming more and more 
important as an advertising medium. 
Its effectiveness, though, depends large- 
ly on programing and presentation. 
Radio stations should look in the mir- 
ror to see why they are not selling 
more time to department stores." 

The Sears-Tucson story suggests 
that Sears' success can be explained 
partly by the deep interest stations 
have taken in the store's sales prob- 
lems. This has resulted in occasional 
special air promotions, but, better than 
that, it has resulted in the steady move- 
ment of goods to the consumer. 



Sears over-all air strategy : 

1' An early-morning (8:15 to 9:00) 
show called 45 Minutes from Broad- 
way on KTUC. Consisting of music 
from Broadway shows, it runs seven 
days a week. 

2. A late-afternoon (4:30 to 5:00) 
{Please I urn to page 89) 



Sears policy on radio 

Sears, Roebuck ad policy does not 
encourage the use of radio b\ ■! 
chain stores. (See "Are Sears and 
Ward anti-radio.- 1 " . SPONSOR, 5 Ma\ 
1952.) While Sears managers hare 
certain amount of ad autonomy, 
over-all strategy limits air budget 
to small share of total. The Tin sun 
Story shoivs what can be done by <t 
smart manager with a "feel" for 
radio programing, selling, Uu tit s 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



35 



case history 



PI oil': from zero to $21 



German-made machine is air- minded pace-setter among foreign sewing machin 



M he home sewing machine has become a Cinderella ap- 
pliance. Just a few short years ago, the average American 
woman scorned sewing machines as being a relic from 
Grandma's attic. Today: 

• Some 81% of the women in this country own a sew- 
ing machine, according to a 1952 survey by Family Circle. 
Manufacturers now estimate that some 38% of American 
women — about 30,000.000 — make most of their own fam- 
ily's clothing on a home sewing machine. 

• Sales are booming. Last year, the sales of sewing 
machines for home use in the U.S. represented some 2,000,- 
000 units, a January 1953 market survey by Electrical 
Merchandising estimated. Prices ranged from about $140 
for portables (or less) on up to $350 or so for fancy 
console models. 

• 1953 looks like a banner year. One industry source 
told SPONSOR that the sale of home sewing machines should 
run -about $225,000,000 at retail." That's about $55,000,- 

000 higher than they were back in 1950. 

What back of these spiraling sales, and the boom in 
home sewing? 

Tlic simplest answer: When a housewife turns out 
e\ entiling from slip covers to dinner gowns with the aid 
of her sewing machine, she saves money. One survey 
quoted women recently as saying they saved anywhere 
from one-half to two-thirds of the cost of ready-made arti- 
cles by making them at home. 

Saving money, however, is only part of the answer. The 
big spurt in sewing machine sales was caused by something 
else: all-out competition between the domestic brands 

1 Singer, White, Free-Weslinghouse, Kenmore. Sew-Gem, 
etc.) and a post-war influx of foreign models ( Pfaff. 
Necchi, Elna, etc.) which can do everything from sewing 
on buttons to darning socks. 

The dent in the sales of U.S. -made brands caused by 
this foreign influx is hard to determine. Singer, still the 
world's largest sewing machine maker, guards sales figures 
as if they were family jewels. Meanwhile, sales of foreign- 
made models are jumping so rapidly (see Pfaff sales chart 



at right) and the total market is expanding so quickly that 
sales perspective has been virtually lost in the industry. 

(An unofficial-but-interesting review of the present mar- 
ket situation was given to sponsor by the agency super- 
visor of a leading sewing machine account. According to 
the agencyman's calculations, Singer accounted for 90%> 
of the U.S. market in 1948. In 1952, the adman estimated, 
Singer's sales were still pretty good — but Singer's share of 
the total U.S. market dropped to 46' « . I 
Foreign models arrive: Necchi. an Italian-made ma- 
chine, and the Elna, a smaller Swiss-made model, arrived 
on the American scene around 1947. In 1948, the products 
of the G. M. Pfaff Company started arriving from the 
French Zone of Western Germany. Later, other sewing 
machines manufactured in Holland, Japan, and Sweden 
began to appear, but the first three — Necchi. Elna. and 
Pfaff — have cornered over 80' ,'< of the foreign-made mar- 
ket, trade sources estimate. 

Although Pfaff was a late starter, industry experts now 
consider it to be the pace-setter among foreign models. 
From its standing start in 1948. PfafFs U.S. sales last year 
passed the $20,000,000 mark, and are presently growing 
at a rate faster than the Necchi-Elna combination. 

"This year Pfaff expects to go to $26,000,000— a 30% 
increase," Martin K. Speckter, v. p. of Bozell & Jacobs ad 
agency, national ad counsel for Pfaff Sewing Machine Sales 
Company, told SPONSOR. 

Necchi-Elna (the two firms combined into one late last 
year) has worked hard to maintain what it claims is its 
slight lead over Pfaff. Currently, about $1,000,000 is being 
spent via the Doyle Dane Bernbach agency for Necchi-Elna 
advertising, part of it on the air. No Necchi-Elna airselling 
is being done at a national network level, the DDB agency 
told sponsor. However, about two-thirds of the total bud- 
get is being allocated to dealer co-operative advertising, 
and dealers are being encouraged to use local-level TV 
and radio spot. Plans are also being drafted to have a 
Necchi-Elna network TV show in the fall. Singer, inci- 
dentally, is top dog presently among sewing machine man- 



'tratvgy: Henry Genthe, of Pfaff Sewing Machine 

\ales Co., shows off fine points of latest model to Mar- 

n Speckter of Bozell & Jacobs, fluff's ad agency 



In East: Local TV and radio spot campaigns are used 
extensively at dealer level in 24 Eastern states. Typi- 
cal dealer show is "Lucille Rivers" on N. Y.'s WPIX 



in West: Network radio show spearheads Western 
drive of A. C. Weber, distributor (r.), looking at 
MBS map of Pfaff -sponsored "Queen for a Day" 







LucilleffV 





PROGRAM 

. . . every Wednesday 
Itom 4:W 10 4:30 over WPIX- 
Channel I 



to sew on the fabulous 
Pfaff /ig-zag sewing 
machine ... at the new 

PFAFF SEWING CENTER 

35* Street and Fifth Ave! 



* Come in ond enroll in one » 

I \ ol Pfoff't famous fashion / 

/ sewing courses. \ 

PFAFF 

filth Avenue it 35* St, New York Cily 



nel 1! . -L 



h 1 



Ill 



trillion in 5 years 



>w selling at fast clip in U.S. market 



ufacturers in big-time TV with its Four Star Playhouse 
on CBS TV aired alternately with Amos 'rC Andy. 

Pfaff, which now experts to be the biggest rival to 
Singer in the U.S. in a couple of years, has set a budget of 
about $1,500,000 for 1953, with a large portion (about 
30%) earmarked for air advertising. Pfaff puts the larg- 
est single slice of its bulget ( almost 60' r ) into magazine 
advertising, but considers air media as its number-two 
promotional weapon in a long list of media items. 

Like Necchi-Elna, Pfaff has no national-level air ad\*er- 
thing at the moment. But its dealer air operations amount 
to virtually national advertising in size and scope. Here's 
how Pfaff's present radio-TV policy works out: 
J. Pfuff's U.S. sales are divided into two "Senior 
Distributor" territories, East and West, with Chicago as 
the dividing point. The Eastern distributor. Pfaff Sewing 
Machine Sales Corporation, handles 24 U.S. states; Chi- 
cago's A. C. Weber Company handles the other 24. 

2. Both senior tlistribulor sccounts are handled by 
the Bozell & Jacobs agency, out of its Chicago and New 
York offices. B&J also handles the national account, which 
is principally magazine advertising. 

3. The two distributors work on a near-autonomous 
basis. Each plans its own distributor and/or dealer- 
distributor advertising. This is passed down the line to 
the larger regional distributors, and finally down to local 
dealers who work largely on a co-op basis. 

4. In the East, spot TV and radio are used in a series 
of dealer co-op arrangements. TV films and radio an- 
nouncements prepared by Bozell & Jacobs are made avail- 
able to dealers, who are also given advice on what is and 
what isn't a good local spot radio or TV buy. In turn, 
dealers buy local time slots, participations and programs 
in spot radio-TV, and insert their local identifications into 
the agency-created commercials. A typical example of 
these extensive dealer air efforts is the weekly Lucille Rivers 
show on New York independent TV station WPIX. 

5. In the Western Pfaff area, where metropolitan areas 
(Please turn to page 94) 



les: Pay-off in all areas is increased business, helped 
smart anpearance of new Pfaff "Serving Center" 
■ •s in which customers learn to use new Pfaff models 



PFAFF 

SEWING CENTER 



IMIlUIMtk- .. 



<§W * 



#_"* 






mr~-— 



From stau uj start in '18, Pfaff *« in 

V.S. have zoomed, should hit new fti</fa in '5.7 



MILLIONS $ 

25 







• 

1 


ii 








£ 






























37 



Why p should reexamine nighttime 

i 

Many sponsors automatically reject night buys even though cost-pcr- 1 .000 is of In 



M he theor) among many national 
advertisers that nighttime spot radio in 
TV cities is less efficient than da\ - 
time is being disproved by stations 
who are coming up with factual evi- 
dence that, on a cost-per-f .000 basis, 
after-dark radio spots can be just as 
good a buy — or even better. 

In taking the offensive against the 
anti-nighttime attitude, stations and 
reps are saying that this bias has been 
impregnated in advertisers' minds by- 
force of habit; that it is very often an 
unrealistic hangover from TV's early 
davs when new set owners were glued 
to their screens at night. What is need- 
ed, it is felt, is a hard-headed but 
flexible evaluation by advertisers of 
night-vs.-day costs-per- 1,000. Reps are 
now energetically moving into the buy- 
ing field with data and arguments to 
prove their point. Here are some re- 
cent examples : 

1' CBS Radio Spot Sales recently 
started showing a presentation giving 



detailed figures to prove that many of 
its TV-area stations have nighttime 
programs and announcements that are 
as good as — or better than — buys dur- 
ing comparable periods in the daytime. 

'*• In connection with a survey of 
the entire spot radio field, which will 
be issued next month. NBC Spot Sales 
will play up low cost-per-1.000 avail- 
abilities from 10:00 p.m. on. 

3. Free and Peters, Inc., has mailed 
out 3,400 copies of a BAB study show- 
ing that the cumulative audience for 
nighttime radio news programs in TV 
markets can reach one-third of all fami- 
lies in such markets in three months" 
time. 

The CBS Radio Spot Sales study has 
been circulated only among a small 
group of advertisers and agencies so 
far, but it will continue to make the 
rounds of important air customers. 
Here is what Eugene J. Cogan. director 
of media at Marschalk & Pratt (which 
has the Esso account! said about it: 



"The presentation made a good im- 
pression here and I think it will do a 
lot to clear up some misconceptions 
among advertisers in general about the 
cost-per-1,000 of nighttime radio. The 
presentation seemed to indicate that the 
drop in nighttime radio listening is not 
as bad in old TV markets as in the 
newer ones, where the novelty of TV 
has not yet worn off. A lot of people 
have been selling nighttime radio short 
but that hasn't been true here. One of 
our clients who has questioned the 
value of nighttime radio is re-examin- 
ing his ideas about it as a result of the 
presentation." 

Tucker Scott, time buying coordina- 
tor at BBDO. commented: "The pres- 
entation is a welcome addition to the 
body of facts about nighttime radio 
and we are always glad to see construc- 
tive analysis of such an important me- 
dium. We have been studying it with 
a great deal of interest." 

The study is the work of the rep's 



GEORGE CASTLEMAN (L.) SHOWS CBS RADIO SPOT SALES STUDY ON NIGHT-VS.-DAY COSTS TO TUCKER SCOTT OF BBDO 




pot radio 



vcr than daytime 



sales development department, which 
was set up in 1950 to sell the CBS sta- 
tions to advertisers themselves — new 
ones as well as old. As a presentation, 
it was the brain-child of George Castle- 
man, former vice president and ralio 
director of Bermingham, Castleman & 
Pierce. Herhert Carlhorg, also a for- 
mer agency man I N. W. Ayer) , is man- 
ager of the department. 

The study starts off by pointing up 
a cycle in the buying of da) time radio, 
which is apparently repeating itself at 
night. Advertisers are reminded that 
at one time morning radio was taboo 
among national advertisers. 

"For many years," the study goes 
on, "the now-prized early-morning 
franchises were bought by local adver- 
tisers, who had the temerity to buy 
without benefit of research. Their suc- 
cess encouraged national advertisers to 
test these unresearched opportunities. 
And a new 'formula' of national spot 
buying resulted." 

The same thing seems to be happen- 
ing to purchases of radio after 6:00 
p.m., the presentation continues. It is 
pointed out that local advertisers are 
buying more and more nighttime radio, 
that their purchases of evening radio 
time on CBS owned-and-operated sta- 
tions have shown a steady increase 
from 1950 to 1952. 

This trend is considered doubly sig- 
nificant since ( 1 ) the biggest gain in 
local advertising buys has been in the 
purchase of program time, which costs 
more per unit than either announce- 
ments or participations and ( 2 I the lo- 
cal advertiser knows his sales results 
pretty accurately (he doesn't need re- 
search to find it out I and he will buy 
air time only when he gets a direct 
benefit from it. 

What explains this interest by local 
advertisers in nighttime radio? As CBS 
puts it. there are, for one thing, vast 
changes going on in the "working mar- 
ket" and. consequently, in buying hab- 
its. These changes are linked to an in- 

( Please turn to page 95 I 
23 FEBRUARY 1953 



Night radio cost per-listener often lower than day 

CBS Radio Spot Sales stu,h. below, compares cost-per-1,000 adult listeners in Tl markets 
for programs during the day and night. Ratings <■'< based mi September-October 1952 
Pulse memoes and compare listenership ■ metropolitan areas surveyed Pulse. 

Thus numbei <>1 listeners iier program belou doesn't reflect total listeners in station area. 



r 



STATION A 



LIST. LIST. COST-PER- 

r.«»ST '»='?,. AVERAGE IPO PER X^OULT 

DAY AND NIGHTTIME PROGRAM PER-WEEK RATING HOMESt PROGRAMt LIST. 



nflv n° ws 
NIGHT 



12:06-12:14 p.m. 



News 
6:06-6:14 p.m. 



$188.25 8.1 113 
$1£8.25 7.9 143 



7,897 S7.04 
9,747 $6.43 



News 
7:00-7:05 a.m. 



DAY 

fUiPUT News 

HIUn I 11:00-11:10 p.m. 



$107.34 5.1 161 

$ £8.87 4.1 166 



7,080 $5.05 
5,871 $5.05 



•COST: Time am< talent for 3-per-week, 20 week 
tAdult Listeners only 



iiipiiimiiiii 



DAY 
DAY 



Music 
8:30-9:00 a. 

Music 
4:30-6:00 p. 



STATION B 

$ 51.84 4.5 127 
$ 43.20 4.4 120 



8,180 S2.ll 
7,560 SI. 90 



Music 



NIGHT 6:30-6:45 p.m. 

Mystery 
10:30-11:00 p.m. 



NIGHT T 



$ 56.70 8.6 137 
$ 37.80 4.2 168 



16,970 SI. 11 
10,100 81.25 



/mm 



njllf Talk show 
UHI 7:15-7:30 a.m. 



COST: 3-per-week, 13-week basis; d11 shows above are j,artkipations 

limn 



STATION C 

$121.50 2.5 147 27,460 $1.47 



DAY?3 



sic 
:45-2:15 p.m. 



$148.50 3.9 110 



32,050 81.54 



NIGHT 10:15-10:30 

NIPUT Musie 

Nluill 10:30-11-30 



p.m. 



p.m. 



$121.50 3.7 170 



$ 98.55 2.6 167 



46,990 S .86 
32,450 SI. 01 



DAY 8:00-8:15 a.m. 



DAY 



News 
7:00-7:15 a.m. 



STATION D 

$795.00 5.1 127 106,760 82.48 
$750.00 5.1 155 130,290 81.92 



MIPUT News 

NlUn I 10:30-10:45 p.m. 



$720.17 4.6 170 128,890 S 1 .86 



NIGHT 



News, Spfs., Weath. $563.58 3.8 161 100,850 S I .JUJ 

11:00-11:15 p.m. 

•COST: Tim- and talent f"i 3 



l_ 



1 



m'OST' 3 per week, 13 week bas s; all ■'■■ arc participations 

IIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|I||||||||||!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|[||IIIUIII!IIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIII "lilllllllll'llll"iiil!ll:ll!l::illlll!l!iilllllllllllllllllllllllir 



Gez-fme, mZWflK6f stUcUed (mu interviews) 



Table as of 15 Dec, 1952 from beginning of ARBI (except studies for(Bfl&) 



Radio Newspaper Bofcki 



TRAFFIC 
Number 

TRAFFIC 
percent. 




You ne 




tloral of ARBI point-of-sale media tests: 
retailers need radio and print 



M he charts on these pages constitute 
the most complete report to date on 
the results of ARBI point-of-sale re- 
search. They are based on 201 studies 
of retail advertising effectiveness in 
markets across the country. This covers 
the period from ARBFs inception in 
iMay 1950 through 15 December 1952. 

ARBI ( Advertising Research Bu- 
reau Inc.) is unique among media re- 
search firms because it bases its studies 
on results at the cash register not o i 
circulation figures. Its technique is 
simply to find out how many customers 
are influenced b\ two competing media 
in entering a stoic to buy a test item 
when an equal amount of money is 
spent l>\ the store in each medium. 
( For fuller explanation see illustrations 
below page at right. I 

Usually AH HI has compared news- 
papers with radio stations in single- 
market, single-store, and multiple-store 
tests. The technique has. however, been 
applied to TV vs. radio tests an I ma\ 



conceivably be used in the future for 
national-level tests. 

In the 201 radio vs. newspaper tes's 
here summarized, customers who said 
they came to the counter through radio 
advertising accounted for 39.5% of 
the dollar volume of test merchandise. 
Newspapers accounted for 23.5% of 
the dollar volume. 

The remaining percentage of dollar 
volume in the tes's was from customers 
who came to the counter without any 
advertising influence (25%) and cus- 
tomers who said they'd learned about 
the test merchandise from both radio 
and newspapers (12%). 

To Joseph B. Ward, president of 
ARBI. this 12' r figure is the most sig- 
nificant to come out of the 201 studies. 
"It shows." he told sponsor, "that 



research 



there are really two markets a retailer 
has to reach — those customers who can 
only be pre-sold by radio and those 
who can only be reached by news- 
papers. The moral is that the retailer 
who uses only newspaper, for example, 
is failing to reach a substantial por- 
tion of his potential market." 

Ward is a Seattle management con- 
sultant who has had wide experience in 
applying analytical methods to busi- 
ness problems. He founded ARBI be- 
cause he felt usual media research 
methods had failed in providing cash- 
register guidance to the advertiser. 
Because he now travels the nation 
widely to explain his ARBI technique 
before ad club and retailer meetings, 
he has gained a first-hand knowledge 
of retailer advertising and marketing 
problems. The next issue of SPONSOR 
(9 March I will carry an article by 
Ward listing questions retailers ask 
him most frequently about air adver- 
tising and giving his answers. * * * 



-!0 



SPONSOR 



..—traffic was about equal 



27.9* 



25.5^ 



RADIO NEWSPAPER 

CONLV) (pHV$ 



.—radio's dollar volume was 68% higher 

39.5* 



23.5* 




RADIO NEWSPAPER 

Conly) Conly) 



3.— but less than 10% came in be- 
cause of both* newspaper and radio 



TRAFFIC 



7.8 



I I 

so Studies 201 Studies 

DOLLAR VOLUME OF PURCHASES' 

■£? 12.0 

i i 

so studies coi studies 

^CUSTOMERS WHO BOTH HEARD AND SAW ADVERTISEMENTS 



4.— you need both to do the job 




ARBI objective is to scientifically match media: advertiser puts equal 
sums into radio, newspapers to advertise same item. Then trained 



interviewers go to counter where item is sold. Questionnaire avoids 
influencing customers, doesn't mention media. Record of sales is exact 



A*Bi 



FUNDAMENTALS 



Kjdlo N«MC»<wr Rkfio HnM»«pit Eadio N«m|»pe< 





EQUAL IDENTICAL SIMULTANEOUS 

DOLLARS MERCHANDISE ADVERTISING 




INTERVIEWING AT POINT OF SALE 





TO COUNT Ut TW« *UST 
BE vfcRiOCATiON 

CX V'TAl iNTtttCST 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



41 



How Vi raised lislaiid to top ") 

Carpel firm had identity problem till TV made brand household word 



M he many self-appointed authorities 
on the subject of women will probably 
be surprised to learn that a period of 
about two years usually elapses be- 
tween the time the '"little woman" starts 
siaring critically at the living room rug 
and the time she gets around to buying 
a replacement. When it comes to a 
major household expenditure, house- 
wives make a number of trial expedi- 
tions, and change their minds a few 
times before taking the plunge. 

Possibly to accelerate this process, 
and certainly to solidly imprint its 
brand name and the qualities of its 
line of carpeting on shoppers' minds. 
C. H. Masland & Sons of Carlisle, Pa.. 
turned to TV advertising in 1949 after 
a long history of only printed media. 

Commencing in September with a 
once-a-week, quarter-hour musical 
show in 18 markets, the family-owned 
carpet company now earmarks well 
over 50% of its total advertising bud- 
get to promoting Masland Beautiblend 
Broadlooms on Today (NBC TV, 38 
markets I and the Garry Moore Show 
(CBS TV, 45 markets). The company 
will spend an estimated $300,000 on 
TV this year. The rest of the budget 



goes into full-color magazine ads. trade 
papers, newspapers, and the neyv spol 
radio effort. 

Masland. which has occasionally- 
used spot radio in the past to bolster 
special campaigns is planning a spot 
saturation schedule in 60 markets this 
spring. This campaign will concen- 
trate on a new 100% Saran carpet 
called Saranette. 

Through Anderson & Cairns, Inc., 



case history 



Masland has, with the exception of 
short vacations, followed the shifts and 
turns of TV progress with a gradually 
increasing budget. Now making its 
fifth shift within the video frameyvork. 
Masland has been consistent in its ob- 
jectives, alert to trends and opportu- 
nities. 

Testament to the company's astute- 
ness is the estimate of carpet trade in- 
siders that Masland is now in the in- 
dustry's top five, a position the firm 
never enjoyed previously. Masland. 
which never discloses sales or yardage 



figures, is content to keep its own 
counsel and pour on just a little more 
of the same technique it has used for 
the past three years. 

For reasons no one seems sure of, 
the company always has found it diffi- 
cult to get people to remember the 
name "Masland." But. according to 
an Anderson & Cairns spokesman, "We 
have found the audio-visual combi- 
nation has really worked. A research 
survey made in May 1950 on the im- 
pact of Masland television advertising 
showed that TV had increased Mas- 
land identification by six times in tele- 
vision homes." 

This report came only eight months 
after Masland had started sponsorship 
of Earl Wrightson's At Home Shoiv in 
the Wednesday evening 7:45-8:00 slot 
in 18 CBS TV markets. By June, when 
the firm decided to take a summer 
hiatus, the show was being seen in 21 
markets and had a growing audience 
thanks, in part, to the fact that it was 
getting a "feed-in" audience to Arthur 
Codfrey's program. 

In the fall, CBS TV put forward the 
argument that a 15-minute once-a-week 
slot was obsolete in terms of TV sales 



L ||*ef Earl Wrightson's "At Home Show" was Masland's TV debut, but single X/QOflflfl 

II wl nighttime quarter-hour weekly couldn't compete against longer shows VvvUIIU 



'Tales of Tomorrow" was on over a year. Account exec Earl Knipe, 



agency chairman T. H. Anderson, Jr.. "Mike 



and confe 




except on a strip basis dining prime 
evening hours. Instead, the company 
was persuaded to accept the 11:00 to 
11:15 p.m. segment on Mondays. The 
saving on time costs ( with a few bucks 
thrown in ) permitted Masland to use 
32 markets (CBS TV I from Septem- 
ber 1950 to June 1951 for Earl Wright- 
son's At Home Show. 

immediate sales response: Pro- 
moted heavily to Masland dealers by 
direct mail and trade advertising, the 
program quickly got enthusiastic sales 
response. At one salesmen's meeting 
the lid almost came off the hall when, 
after a showing of a kine of the 
Wrightson show, Earl Wrightson 
stepped out on the stage and delivered 
a song in person. Dealers soon began 
hounding the advertising agency for 
help in local TV efforts. To this end. 
Anderson & Cairns now supplies 
scripts, timebuying savvy, and film 
clips for local use. 

After the 1951 summer hiatus, Mas- 
lend shifted the At Home Show to ABC 
TV, using 16 markets, but getting the 
more desirable 10:30 to 10:45 p.m. 
time period on Wednesdays. During 
the next three months it became in- 
creasingly obvious that a single Class 
A quarter-hour segment per week was 
not strong enough to compete with 
half-hour and longer shows which were 
programed against it. In December, 
consequently, the At Home Show was 
canceled and the agency set out in 
search of a program which not only 



What Huslaml learned in 30 months on TV 

1. Combination of audio <in<l video is highly effective in increasing 
brand identification and recognition. In eight months Masland 
identification was increased six-fold in the TV markets used 

2. Dealer enthusiasm is whipped up when II personalities make 

personal appearances at sales meetings, conventions; also by book- 
let on interior decoration which was used as a traffic-builder 

3. Single, quarter-hour weekly program doesn't have sufficient 

continuity to hold audience against longei more frequent shows. 
Buy-in strip program accomplishes objective to greater extent 

4. Black-and-white factor of TV needn't be a limitation. To the 
contrary, it permits the housewife to take the pattern shown and 
add her own color ideas, fit the item into her own home setting 



5. Special promotions and the addition of new lines ma\ be gotten 
off to a flying start by bolstering TV with spot radio sat lira ion 
campaign thus greatly increasing the impact in selected markets 

liiiiiiiiiiniiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



would fit the company's budget but 
which would have sufficient continuity 
to insure brand identification and re- 
call. 

Looking around, the agency discov- 
ered a rapidly-growing interest in sci- 
ence fiction (see "Mars dead ahead, 
sir!" sponsor 10 September 1951). 
ABC TV offered Tales of Tomorrow on 
an alternate-week basis, swapping off 
with Jacques Kreisler, maker of watch- 
bands and jewelry. This program was 
carried over an ABC TV network of 



17 stations on Fridays from 9:30-1 0:00 
p.m. from 25 January 1952 until the 
end of the year. 

As the year drew to a close, Masland 
and its agency reexamined its think- 
ing, subjecting both programing and 
costs to further study. While it was 
agreed that Tales of Tomorrow had 
done an excellent job in terms of sales, 
dealer response, and ratings. Masland 
decided to switch its approach. 

The new strategy called for pinpoint- 
i Please turn to page 80) 



urrent 



Garroway's "Today" is now used by Masland to reach 38 markets dur- 
ing morning period: a'so used to hypo dealers at sales meetings 



Garry Moore is counted upon to "soft sell" afternoon housewives' audience 
using low key, highly personalized approach, which is preferred by Masland 








I 



How much does it 
to keep a bear? 




IF he draws a big enough crowd, a bear can earn every last berry you feed him. And 
the trick with a bear — or with any kind of entertainment, in person, in print, or on 
the air— is always the same: to find a balance between how much an attraction costs and 
how much it attracts. A way that is gaining new conviction among America's leading 
advertisers is network radio. For it continues to draw more people at less cost, prospect 
for prospect, than any other medium. It permits a rounded advertising program, with 



CSSs; 







te^^r 



Tequency that keeps impressions fresh. And it leaves ample funds for merchandising 
md dealer promotion. In radio, the costs of attractions, for the numbers they attract, 
are lowest on CBS Radio. It has more of the traffic-building top shows than all other 
networks combined ... and its sponsors invest 24 to 178 per cent more than on the 
)ther networks. Do draw the crowds on CBS Radio— where entertainment is like a 
Dear that performs on a birdlike appetite. 

CBS RADIO NETWORK 

Where America Listens Most 



New and upcoming television stations 



/|||l!lll!llllllll!lllllll!llli:ill!lllllll!llllllll!IIIIIIU^ 



f. JSeiv construction permits 



CITY & STATE 



Ashtabula, Ohio 
Peloit, Wis. 
Billings, Mont. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Clayton, Mo. 
Eugene, Ore. 
Eureka, Cal. 
Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Culfport, Miss. 
Hampton-Norfolk, Va 

Hartford, Conn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Lansing, Mich. 
Longview, Tex. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Midland, Tex. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minot, N. D. 
Minot, N. D. 
Newport News, Va. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Parkcrsburg, W. Va. 
Portland, Me. 
Rome, Go. 
Roswell, N. M. 
Salem, Ore. 
Temple, Tex. 
Texarkana, Tex. 
Tyler, Tex. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. ! 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO. 



fl N - A I R 
TARGET 
DATE VISUAL 



POWER IKW)*' 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STATIONS 
ON NOW 



SETS IN 

M'TKET 

NOW! 



LICENSEE-OWNER 



I 



WICA-TV 


15 


WGEZ-TV 


57 


KOOK-TV 


2 


Unknown! 


71 


WCHV-TV 


64 


KFUO-TVi 


30 


Unknown 


20 


K.EM-TV 


3 


KQTV 


21 


WCGM-TV 


56 


WVEC-TV 


15 


Unknown': 


24 


WJHL-TV 


11 


WILS-TV 


54 


Unknown 


32 


WHBQ-TV 


13 


Unknown 


2 


WCAN-TV 


25 


KCJB-TV 


13 


Unknown 


10 


WHYU-TV 


33 


Unknown!: 


63 


Unknown 


25 


KLPR-TV 


19 


Unknown 


15 


WLAM-TV 


53 


WROM-TV 


9 


KSWS-TV 


8 


Unknown 


24 


KTEM-TV 


6 


KCMC-TV 


6 


Unknown 


19 


Unknown 


51 


WTOB-TV 


26 



Unknown 


19 


10 




Unknown 


20.8 


12.5 




Dec. '53 


5.0 


2.5 




Unknown 


218 


109 




1 Oct. '53 


118 


66.3 




Unknown 


175 


91 




Unknown 


19.5 


11 




Unknown 


17.3 


9.3 




1 Oct. '53 


22.4 


12 




Unknown 


21.5 


11.6 




Unknown 


220 


110 




Unknown 


235 


118 




1 Aug. '53 
15 Sep. '53 
Unknown 


54 


27 




25.6 


13 




20 


11 




1 Aug. '53 


316 


158 




Unknown 


51 


26 




June '53 


105 


56 




Unknown 


28.6 


14.3 




Unknown 


57.3 


31 




Early summer 21 


11 




Mar. '54 


215 
17.3 


108 




Unknown 


8.6 




Unknown 


90.2 


48.7 




Unknown 


18.9 


9.45 


- 


Unknown 


22.2 


13.3 




Unknown 


2.9 


1.45 




Unknown 


110 


55 




Unknown 


104.7 


56.5 




Unknown 


12.9 
18.5 


6.5 




June '53 


9.4 




Unknown 


2.4 


1.3 




Unknown 


23.2 


13.9 




Unknown 


200 


100 








Unknown 





Unknown 





300 





5,055 UHF 





5,000 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





10.000 





Unknown 


1 


152,000 


1 


Unknown 





4,000 


1 


108,000 





Unknown 


1 


1E0,000 





Unknown 


1 


400,000 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 


1 


141,000 





141,000 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 





Unknown 



WICA. Ire. (As'tabula 
Star- Beacon ) 

Belo ' Brtc.tg. Co. 
(WGEZ) 

Mon**--" Network 
(K00K) 

Coin. State Bd. of Educ 

Ea'- h s- * Barham 
(WCHV) 

Luthr r an C l, »Teh. Missouri 
Syne-1 (KFUO) 

W. Gordon Allen 



Rc->i»-< Bdcstg. Co. 
!K!EM) 



No'f-'S' TV Co. 
(K C VD. KFMY) 



WGCM Television Corp. 



Pen'-— '» Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WVEC) 



Conn. S'ate Bd. of Educ 
WJML. Inc. 



L.-vs "T Bdcstg. Co. 
(WHS) 



East Texas TV Co. 



Ha'^n-i College 
(WH3Q) 

Permian Pasin TV Co. 



M -h. v , st Bd-stg. Co. 

(WAN) 



Nor*h Dakota Bdcstg. Co. 
(KC)B) 



W H. Lancaster Pearson 
Jr. 



W. A. Pcm^roy 



John H. Cleghorn 



Alex Ro iin.iM 



Rudr-an TV Co. 



Eas* -" rt-v s *q Corp. 
(WHYU) 

Conn. State Bd. of Educ. 

Ok'a To TV » Bdcstg. 
Co. (-0 KWC0) 

KLPR Te'rvis'on Co. 



W"s\ Va. Enterprises. 
Inc. 



p fl _. •-,.,. t Tp!r. ra -tJn<i Corp. 
(Wl AM Lrw'ston) 



Coes-* V«"->y Ra-llo Co. 

IWRPM) 



Job-* A Parnett 
(KSWS) 



auren B e A. Harvey 



B<-" ""'-''Shinq Co. 
(KTEM) 



KCM" Inc. 'Te-arkaia 
Gazette & News) 



.'a^*i A. N w'*orn Jr. 



Po'an Industries 



Wl-stonSa'm Bdcstg. 
Co. (WTOB) 



Frederic F. Clair 



F. O. Myers 



If. New stations on air 



CITY & STATE 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS I NO. 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



POWER IKW)" 
VISUAL I AURAL 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



ST«T"iNS 
ON NOW 



S^TS IN I 

M*"KET 

NOWt 



LICENSEE-OWNER 



MANAGER 



REPRES 
TATIVI 



Lincoln, Neb. 


KCLN-TV 


12 


Lynchburg, Va. 


WLVA-TV 


13 


New Britain, Conn. 


WKNB-TV 


30 


Reading, Pa. 


WHUM-TV 


61 


Roanoke, Va. 


WROV-TV 


27 


Youngstown, Ohio 


WFMJ-TV 


73 



12 Feb. 

8 Feb. 
11 Feb. 

9 Feb. 
14 Feb. 
6 Feb. 



21.5 

28 
205 
260 
105 
175 



11 

14 

105 

135 

62 
89 



DuM 

CBS, DuM 

CBS 

CBS 

ABC 

NBC 



Ham'd E. Ander- 
son 



?fl OOO Cornhusker Radio-TV 

.to.vvv Cwp (K0LN) 

35 000 Lyn" h i"n Bdcstg. Corp 



Lyn"''>"Ti Bdcstg. Corp. 
(WLVA) 

300 000 Now Britain Bdcstg. Co Peter B. Kenncy Boiling 

• (WKNB) 



Eastern Radio Corp. 
(WHUM) 



Humboldt J. 
Greiq (pres.) 



68,304 

39,800 Radl ° Roanoke (WROV) Frank E. Koehlci 

90 200 Vindicator Printinq Co. Wm. F. Maag Jr. 



Headley- 
Reed 



'I' =• ' i i stations going in 'in' air listed here are those which occt 
iruary "i on which Information could he obtained In that period 

"Powci ol I i' i iii.it i ded in )'((' applications of Individual grantc 

on this II- 1, the Information "a- supplied bv station managers 



rred between ;> and 

•s. In just a few 



[-Information on the number of sets in markets ma covered by NBC Research data is for tl 
pa t obtained dlrecl from station manage] s ami must he deemed approximate So far as si'' 

Is a-lvis .1. 'li" figures pertain t" total sets in market, unless otherwise specifii 
(Educational grant 



46 



SPONSOR 



I 



For commercials 
with impact... it's 

TV Film Spots 

A IA KLDJG 







1 






\1* 






Kling gtudiog 



- 



■ 



>i 



* 



CHICAGO 
601 North Fairbanks Court 

HOLLYWOOD 

(Ray Patin Productions) 6650 Sunset Boulevard 

NEW YORK 

affiliated with Thompson Associates • 40 E. 51st St. 

DETROIT 

1928 Guardian Building 




Pacing, integration, movement, pho- 
tographic excellence, art direction— 
these are the elements that make for 
maximum impact and TV selling power. 
Kling blends these and other ingredi- 
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ished commercials with dramatic effect. 

In both animated and live spots, 
Kling's consistent leadership stems 
from long experience, superior facili- 
ties, and top creative talent. Only Kling 
offers all three. 

Put this three-way key to the test 
and you see the result: Award of excel- 
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tor's for the Godchaux Sugar commer- 
cial produced by Kling's Hollywood 
animation division headed by Ray 
Patin. 

For Ideal Dog Food, this three-way 
key resulted in a Kling-produced com- 
mercial that was chosen among the top 
ten of the best remembered TV spots 
by the Advertest Research Bureau. 

Our modern, fully equipped studios 
in Chicago and Hollywood are at your 
service. Let us give you the top quality 
results you want— commercials that 
sell. Kling gives you Advertising Know- 
manshipplus Hollywood Showmanship! 

These Kling TV spot syndications are 
now available: 

1. Bank spots — cartoon animation 

2. Beer spots— series one (testimonials) 

3. Beer spots — series two (beer with food) 

4. Bread spots — stop action photography 

5. Ice Cream spots 

Now on the presses! Our new booklet of inside infor- 
mation about Kling services. Write for your free copy. 

your only single source for: 

ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL ART 

DISPLAYS 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

TELEVISION FILMS 

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MOTION PICTURES 

SALES TRAINING 

AND MAINTENANCE MANUALS 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



47 




New York Daily Mirror (and approximately 

400 other newspapers) , Sunday 

15 February 1953 



-1 



To Walter Winchell, Business Week, The New York Times, Space & Time 
and many others that commented on sponsor's AB-PT "scoop" we offer this 

explanation. We're not psychic; nor are we much on "scoops." But we do 

specialize in digging, probing, studying, analyzing, interpreting — and 
while so doing occasionally hit one smack on the nose. As one result, 

sponsor is frequently quoted. We followea 7 AB-PT much as we do 
countless other stories, with zeal and purpose in the interests of advertiser 
and agency understanding. We're glad it worked out so well. 



SPONSOR 

The magazine radio and TV advertisers use 



Radio 



a»d now a message 



iiom out sponsoi 




TV 



by Bob Foreman 



U 



.aybe it's because I just won't 
try 1 nit I've never been able to un- 
derstand people who would rather 
rely on a doubtful bar graph than 
on plain common sense, a well- 
founded opinion, or a deep-seated 
conviction. Remember I said a 
"doubtful bar graph." If your re- 
search methods are sound, your 
results should be valid so by all 
means make use of this kind of nu- 
merology to question your com- 
mon sense when it is at odds with 
the charts. 

But make sure your research 
really is foolproof. Don't be satis- 
fied with such criteria as "play- 
back" (recall) when your adver- 
tising is aimed solely at garnering 
cash. Don't settle for "like and 
dislike" charts unless you arc ab- 
solutely certain that these qualities 
have a direct bearing upon the 
sales of your product (I've never 



Conti personalized pitch -features close ups of 
glamorous Lilli Palmer (see Foreman review) 




seen anvone actually prove this). 

And, for goodness sake, don't 
warp your advertising to fit the 
pattern of your research! In other 
words, don't delude yourself or 
lower your esteem by setting out 
to prepare advertising whose main 
function is to come out nicely when 
you research it. It's very easy to 
do this, you know. 

In fact, here's how. If your num- 
ber experts have built up such 
qualities as recall, you eliminate 
ideas from your copy in order to 
increase your recall quotient. Then 
your bar graph is bound to go 
higher at the next reading. But 
let's see what that can mean — per- 
haps you are even farther from the 
desired result of your advertising 
than ever. A case in point: You 
are trying to sell an involved idea 
to the public or to give an over-all 
impression about a costly and com- 
plicated product such as an auto- 
mobile. To get a higher recall, you 
concentrate on only one feature of 
the car — let's say its brakes. By 
constant reiteration of your brake 
^ lory alone backed by relevant 
sound and video gimmicks on these 
brakes, you come up with a re- 
sounding playback for your com- 
mercials. On the other hand, it 
may well be that the most effec- 
tive commercials you could pre- 
pare would merely use brakes as 
a lead in and then go to seven other 
lea hires, ending up with a mention 
of style and economy. Your play- 
1 ack is sure to be lower in this 
copy. But the over-all impression 
about your automobile may be far 
more favorable. 

Reliance on shaky criteria in 
preference to horse sense plays 
many other tricks on us too. Take 
program ratings. They have led 
us up many a dark and blind al- 



ley. Sometimes lower-rating shows 
that obviously (and even by re- 
search) reach the right type of au- 
dience are scrapped for higher- 
rating epics which obviously (and 
by research) appeal to huge seg- 
ments of people who will never be 
in the market for the sponsor's 
product. Yet often we go to great 
lengths to attain the higher num- 
ber. Why? Because it looks bet- 
ter to the advertising manager. 

What about common sense? De- 
spite television's leanings toward 
(and on) that nebulous entity 
known as show business, direct 
brain waves are the best tools we 
have. We sharpen these tools with 
our experience. We use them more 
skillfully when we back them up 
with some factual data if we have 
it. But comments such as "I don't 
think the product looks well in this 
set" and "that announcer seems to 
be insincere" and "my wife says 
no woman would ever peel a pota- 
to that way" and "I think the close- 
up of the gal is very unflattering" 
— remarks like this made by peo- 
ple who have savvy are certainly 
worth noting and acting upon. 

Convictions are wonderful things 
in our business. I refer, of course, 
to good convictions, sound opin- 
ions, based upon experience and 
straight thinking. What this busi- 
ness needs is more people who 
have such convictions and opinions 
and who are willing to subscribe 
to them very much out loud! 



commercial reviews 





TELEVISION 


sponsor: 


Conti Castile Shampoo 


AGENCY: 


Bcrmingham, Castlcman & 




Pierce, N Y.C. 


PROGRAM: 


"Lilli Palmer Show" 


PRODI cer: 


Oasis Telecasts, Inc. 



Absolutely no effort has been made by 
the Conti people to gild the Lilli, and 
when it's the genus of Palmer, it's just 
as well. For this lovely lady scarcely needs 
any adornment. Hence the commercial 
approach employed by Miss Palmer is 
straight and lovely. 

Actually, it does take as beautiful a 
creature as Lilli Palmer to conjure up in- 



50 



SPONSOR 



K 



EYST 



I E E ^ a " 



January 



10, 1953 



B COMPAQ 



I l_ L- 



^m F SOMME1R 



,«$*&"§ 






i 



r->" 



j c president 
e p Edwards, f i 

WLj ' , • „ + r»n Blvd. 

123 Washington o 

on 7 Illinois 
Chicago ', 

ila-t Edwards: 
Dear Mr. tert ainer s, 

You ana your "^ "^ a» ouUUnd^S 

A technicians have rha ps more 

announcers and ^c ^ KeyS tone buV of P proV idmg 

job. Not only for a wonderful 3 tain ment 

Important, you ha ve Arn erican 

^ P of good, cieai , Eand. 

a source oi g ience in WLS 

for your vast aud Qn January ^ 

,.« is a long tim^. we nt 

Tv/enty years is Dance Party 

u the first Keystone U rS were s 

1033, when the . odaY ' s regular re set, 

»»*« ^r»^^ standa : d5 or P «« ^"° mise ' 

children. To max and worry P ^ can 

+ r ,u You can d«= J 
"^ Sincerely Y*«- 

^nd Oe.- —-" 





*■ . V ' 

• *■ ** " . 

] ** ■■ • 


•3 


9 '"^. ;v: 


Tj 


p^^WHMff 



pres 



RES:FW 



I 



he Keystone Steel S Wire Co. has been a regular user of WLS time 
since March 1929. For the past 20 years they have Sponsored a half hour of the 
National Barn Dance every Saturday night. The opportunity to serve 
Midwest farm families during that period 
is one we are glad to have shared with 
this fine company and its equally fine products. 

50,000 WATTS • ABC AFFILIATE 
REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO 



M 



m 
m 



• 'A 






h <mk, kMrntkumi mid... 

3LPHE 

R]tf«JOlI 



R HOST AND STAR IN 



iCPJtmJIJIftli 



Planned for 3 Full-Length 

Commercials Plus Opening 

and Closing Sponsor 

Identifications! 



SOLD 



• • • 



• • • 

T o DRE WRys BEER 

for 6 MARKETS' 

T ° OLVM PIA BREWING 

fo ' 6 MARKETS' 

T ° f GEN / S « BREWING CO 
f O' 5 MARKETS! 




SOLD • • • 







c 



/ 



WMCT 

MEMPHIS, 
has 

stepped 




as of Nov. 23, 1952 



Now 



formerly 15,000 watts 60,000 WflttS 



Now on 
Channel 5 



formerly operating 
on Channel 4 

which means 

bigger audience 

... a wider coverage area which naturally 
embraces a wider listening audience (now 
estimated at more than 185,000 TV homes). 

better reception 

... as actually attested by signed letters from 
listeners in the fringe area of WMCT's cover- 
age. 

to sell Memphis, you need 



Notional Representative* The Brqnhom Co. 

Channel 5 • Memphis 

Affiliated with NBC 

Owned and operated by 

THE COMMERCIAL APPEAL 

Alto affiliated with CBS, ABC and DUMONT 




Memphis ONLY 
TV Station 

WMC WMCF WMCT 



terest in the rather feeble historical lead-in 
that this copy burdens her with before she 
is permitted to get down to the business 
of selling shampoo. I refer to the allegory 
contrived about the story of Lady Godiva 
and her tresses. "But joking aside," says 
Lilli, and then launches into good straight 
copy. The video consists of naught but 
close-ups of Miss Palmer — but that's 
more than enough, in this instance. 

SPONSOR: Arthur Murray Party 

ACENCY: Ruthrauff & Ryan, N.Y.C. 

I'ROCHAM: "Arthur Murray Show" 

Like anyone who's had a TV set for 
six years — in fact, like anyone in the busi- 
ness — I've seen a lot of commercial copy 
televised, live and film. The advertising 
content and abilities of this gamut is as 
varied as the method of presentation. But I 
think if I had to give an Oscar to the 
soundest ad copy I've seen — copy flawlessly 
produced yet without its production obscur- 
ing the message, well-written yet without 
the writing giving it a veneer that one can 
see through and hence mistrusts — if I had 
to pick such a piece of copy, I think it 
might be the live middle commercial on 
the Arthur Murray show I saw of a re- 
cent Sunday night on WABD. 

The particular sales epic to which I re- 
fer began with an oldish sort of guy, thin 
on top, at a party rubbing his hands be- 
cause of the nice-looking young gals pres- 
ent. But when Mr. Almost Bald asks a 
couple of chicks to dance, each turns him 
down. The gals then compare notes agree- 
ing our pal is kind of square when it 
comes to dancing (all this, by the way, is 
live copy, done in dialogue and is as 
natural as ordinary conversation, not stilt- 
ed or phony in any respect) . 

We then get a voice-over pitch about 
the Arthur Murray lessons and this starts 
with a still of the canopy at the studio, 
progresses to live shots of the couples in 
action with an appropriate super of the 
50% price deal. 

Then we come back to Harry (Mr. 
Thin On Top) dancing happily with one 
of the damsels who previously gave him 
the brush while the announcer says only 
one lesson got the gent started. Evidently, 
he got off to a flying start, too! 

Every tried and true ad approach was 
involved here and done superbly. I'd sug- 
gest the younger element on our copy staff 
take a gander at Mr. Murray's copy each 
week. I know I intend to. 



54 



SPONSOR 



WE SELL 




ALL UNDER 

COMMON 

OWNERSHIP. .. 

Outstanding success sto- 
ries have been written by 
advertisers who use these 
three great advertising 
media, The Erie Dispatch, 
TV Station WICU and Ra- 
dio Station WIKK— a mer- 
chandising assistance pro- 
gram without equal is 
available to you. 



Good Cheer Fund Show On WICU Tonight 

BB3I Thk Fj}iEj)isRvrcH 



£ £- JEW FINANCIAL CRISIS 
££35 FACES COUNCILMEN 



: HH BrPU> : 



Mum 



H^im FBI Sat» Brink'* Stuped " Ta ? 



E?"-i=^c" f "^ = 



Pi 




M& 



ERIE, PA. - 5,000 WATTS 



Yes, WICU has all 4 net- 
works, plus outstanding 
local programs. 



The Erie Dispatch — 133 year 
old aggressive daily and Sun- 
day newspaper showing 
healthy lineage and circula- 
tion gains. For Home Product 
advertisers, Tele-Kitchen 
show is a terrific help. Write 
today for details. 



WIKK has top Hooper and 
Pulse ratings. The outstand- 
ing "1330 Review" television 
program assures you of com- 
plete assistance and coverage. 



National Representatives 

WICU-TV—Erie, Pa.—Headley-Reed Co. 
WrVN-7V— Columbus, O.—Headley-Reed Co. 

WrOD— Toledo, O.—Headley-Reed Co. 
WHOO— Orlando, Fla.—Avery-Knodel, Inc. 
WIKK— Erie, Pa.—H-R Co. 
ERIE DISPATCH, Erie, Pa. — Reynolds-Fitzgerald, Inc. 




* RADIO 

* TV 

* NEWSPAPER 



^4Uety/u4e4 inc. 



New York Office— ffoM Borc/oy —Horn* Offic* — 500 Socvrity Bldg., Tolodo, Ohio 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



55 




Rank Past 

Buy. r;mk 



4 7 Foreign intrigue, JWT, Shel. Reynolds (A) 



1 


16 


2 


2 


.'{ 


1 


7 


5 


1 


U 


U 


7 


a 


H 


r, 


n 


:t 


10 


8 


ii 


i 


12 


13 


13 


10 


14 


14 


15 


11 


16 


15 


17 


19 


l« 


18 


19 



Period: 2-8 January 7953 



TITLE. SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 



Death Valley Days, McCann-Erickson (W) 



S ii perm an, MPTV, R. Maxwell frC) 



Doug. Ftiirbanks Presents, NBC Film (D) 



2© 20 



Cisco Kid, Ziv (W) 



The Unexpected, Ziv (D) 



Hopalong Ciissltly, NBC Film (W) 



Jeffrey Jones, CBS Film, L. Parsons (M) 



Boston Blaekie, Ziv (M) 



E\it Carson, MCA, Revue Prod. (W) 



ISanye Hitlers. CBS Film, Flying "A" (W) 



China Smith, PSI-TV, Tableau (A) 



Abbott & Costello, MCA, TCA (C) 



Wild Bill Hickok, W. Broidy (W) 



Dangerous Assign.. NBC Film, Donlevy (A) 



Laurel & Hardy, Unity TV (C) 



Terry & the Pirates, Official, Dougfair (K) 



Wlareh of Time, March of Time (Doc.) 



Itamar of the Jungle, Arrow (A) 



Dick Tract/, Snader (M) 



pro 



II MUM 



» 



\MW D°I 




Avfaqe 
wHnhtrrf 
ratlnflt 



2J.7 



21.3 



20.7 



20.1 



19.8 



/■STATION 
MARKETS 



18.9 



18.8 



18.: 



18.4 



17.9 



J7.1 



16. 



16.1 



16.2 



15.6 



12. 



11.8 



f 1.0 



10.0 



8.: 



N.Y. 


L.A. 






wnbt 

20.4 

10:30pm 


wnbt 
20.7 

10 :30pm 


knbh 

70.6 

10:30pm 


wnbt 

9.2 

7 :00pm 


keca-tv 

7 7.9 

7 :00pm 


keca-tv 

3.9 

8:00pm 


wnbt 

73.7 

:30pm 


knbh 

7 7.4 

5 :30pm 




ivabd 

6.5 

9:30pm 


knbh 

9.0 

7:00pm 


keca-tv 

73.0 

7 :30pra 


u jz-tv 

3.9 

4 :30pm 


knbh 

70.7 

7:00pm 


keca-tv 

77.5 

8:30pm 


webs-tv 

76.7 

10:30pm 


kttv 

74.7 

8:00pm 


wabil 

6.9 

7:00pm 


Utla 

73.2 

6 :00pm 


wnbt 

72.7 

10:30pm 


knbh 

75.7 

10:30pm 


knbh 

7.9 

4 :30prn 


wabd 

5.9 

7 :30pm 


kttv 

73.5 

8:30pm 


wnbt 

3.2 

7:00pm 


kttv 

3.9 

7:30pm 


kttv 

70.4 

7:00pm 



4. STATION 
MARKETS 



3-STATI0N MARKETS 



At'anta Bait 



CI* v<- Columbus Det. 



7.4 

8:00pm 



7 7.4 

7 :30pm 



9.8 

9:30pm 



wenr-tv 

72.8 

10 -000111 



wnbw 

79.6 

10:30pm 



wenr-tv 

20.8 

■. n 



wnbw 

70.4 



wbkb 

75.4 

9 :30pm 



7 7.8 

3:00pm 



wnbw 

7 7.0 

1 :30pm 



wbkb 

73.2 

10:00pm 



wabd 

3.7 

6:30pm 



knbh 

6.5 

10:30pm 



wbkb 

26.4 

9 :30pm 



wenr-tv 

79.0 

2:30pm 



wtop-tv 

8.2 

■ '. : j i i i , i , i 



wnbq wttg 

9.2 4.6 

9:30pm 9:30pm 



wenr-tv wtop-tv 

77.0 74.8 

1:30pm 1:00pm 



wenr-tv wmal-tv 

74.6 8.6 

10:00pm 7:30pm 



4.2 7 7.6 

11:00am 7:30pm 



wenr-tv wtop-tv 

7.4 70.4 

10:00pm 10:30pm 



9.0 

7:00pm 



wgn-tv wttg 

7.8 9.8 

6:00pm 5 :30pm 



77.8 

10 :00pm 



74.8 

7:00pm 



77.3 

6:30pm 



wwj-tv 

74.0 

10:30pm 



79.5 

10:30pm 



wkre-tv wews 

23.0 76.3 

9:30pm 10:00pm 



wjbk-tv wi 

76.0 7 

10:30pm 10 



waga-tv wbal-tv wepo-tv wnbk wbns-tv wxyz-tv m 

27.8 78.8 26.3 27.8 75.3 27.5 2 

7 00pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7 :00pm 7:1 



waga-tv wbal-tv 
8.0 8.8 

7:00pm 10:30pm 



wbns-tv wjbk-tv 

29.5 76.0 

9:30pm 10:30pm 



wsb-tv uh:il iv 



wnbk wbns-tv wwj-tv 



78.0 79.8 75.8 75.0 77.0 75.3 2 

>:30pm 5:30pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 1:00pm 5:30pm 6: 



wepo-tv 

74.3 

8:30pm 



wjbk-tv 

77.3 

6:00pm 



wlw-t 

29.8 

8:30pm 



wbns-tv wwj-tv wt 

23.8 72.5 

9:00pm 6:30pm 7: 



wltv wmar-tv 

79.0 73.3 

6:00pm 6:00pm 



wnbk wbns-tv 

77.5 72.3 

6:00pm 7:30pm 



wews 

23.5 

6:00pm 



25 



78.3 6.3 

10:30pm 11:00pm 



wxyz-tv 

8.8 

8:00pm 






wbal-tv wlw-t wxel wlw-c wxyz-tv mM 

74.8 20.8 72.0 20.8 72.3 7| 

10:30pm 9:30pm 10:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm S.M 



wsb-tv wbal-tv wkre-tv wnbk wbns-tv wwz -tv u 

24.5 77.5 79.8 7 7.8 26.8 70.8 3d 

5:30pm 7:00pro 6:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:: 



73.8 

10:30pm 



wnbk wbns-tv 

79.0 77.8 

10:30pm 9:30pm 



m 
H 

in 



wbal-tv 

72.3 

6:30pm 



wbns-tv wxyz-tv 

20.5 9.0 

6 :30pm 6 :00pm 



wnbk wbns-tv wxvz-tv wf 

77.8 74.3 74.8 

6:30pm 5:30pm 4:30pm 6 



ii 



waga-tv wbal-tv wepo-tv wews wbns-tv wjbk-tv % 

7 7.8 7.8 72.3 8.5 74.8 72.3 

7:00pra 7:00pm 9:30pm 7:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:il 



wxyz-tv wffl 

74.0 1. 

6:30pm 4:11 



wsb-tv 

77.3 

6 :00pm 



wxyz-tv 

76.3 

7:00pm 



- 



Show type symbols: (A) adventure; (C) comedy: (D) drama; (Doe.) documentary) ; (K) kid 
show; (Ml mystery; (W) western. Films listed are half-hour length, bioadcast in four or 
mure of above markets. Average weighted rating arrived at as follows: Individual market ratings 



are weighted In proportion to number of TV homes In each market. For Instance. In J» 
1953. TelePulse gave a weight of IS to New York, as compared to a weight of 1 for Cincli 
Wank space Indicates film not bioadcast in this market a-, of 2-8 January 1953. Willie ne 




2-STATION MARKETS 



Host. Day'on Mpls. 



70.5 

9:30pm 



?n 8 

lfl:0npm 



25.0 

6:00pm 



77.8 

6:30nm 



kstp-tv 

26.5 

9:30pm 



wnar-tv 

79.3 

10:30pm 



kstp - tv 

23.8 

9 :30pm 



ubrc-tv wnac-tv 

37.3 79.8 

5:30pm 5:30pm 



kslp-tv 

2 7.8 

4:30nn 



wnar-iv whlu-tv wcco-tv 

7 7.0 78.8 24.3 

6:15pm 10:00pm 9:30pm 



wbz-tv wlw-d wcco-tv 

9.8 9.8 23.8 

1:00pm 6:o0pm 6:00pm 



wbz-tv 

23.5 

10:30pm 



wnac-tv whio-tv wcco-tv 

26.5 24.8 27.5 

7:00pm 9:00pm 9:30pm 



*afm-tv wnac-tv wlw-d 

I 23.8 72.3 24.5 

6:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 



26.5 

7 :00pm 



24.5 

5:00pm 



27.8 

9:30pm 



wlw-d kstp-tv 

23.0 20.8 

9:30pm 5:00pm 



wafra-tv wnac-tv wlw-d wcco-tv 

27.8 8.8 7 7.5 73.3 

6:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 5:00pm 



l-STATION MARKETS 



Buffalo N~w O. Seattle St. Lc-uis 



5?0 

9:30pm 



ivhen-tv wdsu-tv 

^7.5 25 5 

7:t0pm 5:00pra 



37.5 

5:30pm 



fcsd-tv 

47.5 

10:30pm 



wdsu-tv 


ksd-tv 


52.5 


26.0 


9:30pm 


11:00pm 



wben-tv wdsu-tv klng-tv ksd-tv 

35.0 28.5 44.0 36.5 

5:00pm 5:00pm 7:00pm 4:30pm 



wdsu-tv 

56.0 

9:30pm 



ksd-tv 

50.5 

10:00pm 



wben-tv wdsu-tv klng-tv ksd-tv 

36.0 40.0 37.5 25.5 

3:00pm 1:30pm 6:00pm 9:30am 



wben-tv wdsu-tv 

23.5 48.0 

11:30pm 10:00pm 



ksd-tv 

35.0 

11:30pm 



wdsu-tv 

37.5 

2:00pm 



ksd-tv 

34.0 

2:30pm 



wdsu-tv king-tv 

52.5 44.5 

6:00pm 7:00pm 



wdsu-tv 

45.5 

10:00pm 



ksd-tv 

55.5 

9:45pm 



wdsu-tv 

55.0 

9 :30pm 



wlw-d wcco-tv 

75.3 26.3 

ll» :30pm 9:0Opm 



wbrc-tv wbz-tv wlw-d 

I 79.0 70.8 9.8 

4:30pm 5:00pm 6:00pm 



). wafm-tv wnac-tv whio-tv kstp-tv 

76.5 9.3 8.5 20.8 

I 6:30pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 5:30pm 



- 



wbz-tv 

27.0 

6:00pm 



kstp-tv 

27.5 

9:30pm 



wben-tv wdsu-tv klng-tv ksd-tv 

26.5 44.0 28.5 32.0 

1:00 pm 3:30pm 1:30pm 12noon 



wben-tv 

52.5 

10:30pm 


wdsu-tv 

56.0 

7 :30pm 



wben-tv 

42.5 

7:00pm 



klng-tv 

26.0 

1:00pm 



wdsu-tv klng-tv ksd-tv 

33.5 57.5 53.0 

11:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 



a ? are fairly stable from month to month, In number of market* In 
they are run, this is true to much lesser extent with syndicated 
This should be borne in mind when analyzing rating trends 



See next page for film notes and trends 



YOUR PRODUCTION DEMANDS 
THE EXCELLENCE OF 

Precision I 
Prints 

The sharpness of a print depends on Bl jfc,", * jg ~ *^*f| 

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cision, ili'- i"c films are absoluti 9jt- "3 ^tt 

- 1 . 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 .- 1 1 \ during exposun . I i : Sfe ^^^8sR 

and effects are produced wiilmui H 
notching original. 



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Newest Facilities in the 16mm 
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including exclusive Maurer- 
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at Precision! 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES. INC. 

21 West 46th St., 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



- 




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Write tor your copy now 



'EERLESS 



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I FILM PROCESSING CORPORATION 
I US Witt ••■■• 1TIEIT. NIW TOIK 34. HCW YORK 
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on 




58 



I :' ■_ in 'ui;:: mi!;-:;ii:;: 'ii;..,iii:.. i , j 1 !! :!': in.. mi, ■ mi, .iii :m. ■:im. ■ .in n: g 

Horse opera leads again: A consistent trend revealed in 
SPONSOR-TelePulse ratings on spot TV films to date is that lead- 
ership has been held by the same type of show — the Western. 
An ouL.oor drama has topped this monthly rating report for 
three successive months. Death Valley Days, coming up all the 
way from No. 16 place, replaced Range Riders at the head of 
list (see chart on pages 56-57). Another interesting angle about 
tne spot film ratings for latest period covered by TelePulse is 
the emergence of Douglas Fairbanks Presents from nowhere = 

suddenly into the No. 3 spot across the country. 

Bullantine's re-runs: Encouraged by last year's results, Bal- 
lamine Beer will again this summer restrict telecasting to re- 
runs of its Foreign Intrigue series. What happened last sum- 
mer was this: The highest ratings obtained by the show in Bal- 
lant ne's four key markets — New York, Philadelphia, Boston 
and Washington — up to that time was from the re-runs. In 
other words, the re-runs carried through June, July, and Au- 
gust exceeded the ratings that Intrigue first showings got be- 
tween 1 January and 1 June. The results were quite gratifying 
to the sponsor especially in view of the fact that summer adver- jj 

tising is so important to his product. Here's how the re-runs 
fared in each of the four markets. In New York re-runs 
started with a 12 rating and built up to a 15; in Boston ratings 
went from 9 in June to 12 in August; in Washington the jump 
was from 5 to 17, while in Philadelphia, the June rating was 
12 and the August rating, 16. The Ballantine playing arrange- 
ment for 1953 calls for 39 new shows and 13 re-runs. 

Bait for sponsor prospects* Ad agencies in Denver are re- 
ported to have taken options on important syndicated series 
w'th a view to offering them as bait to accounts they want to 
lure away from a competitive agency. Syndicate sales mana- 
gers expect this to become quite a practice in the more impor- 
tant newly-opened TV markets. 

■V "▼" ~yr 

Bote about comedy? A frequent plaint heard among agency 
buyers of film is that there aren't enough situation-comedy 
films available in the syndicate field. They say their clients 
show a preference for this t\ pe of fare not so much because a 
-iluatinn-ioincih show. / Love Lucy, is top rater, as the Eacl 
it's be'ter to lead from laughs into a commercial than from a 
somber dramatic situation or any low key mood. 

How perishable is TV film? A topic which is frequently 
speculated on among agency film buyers and syndicators is: 
How many years will it take on the average for a TV film using 
civilian backgrounds to become obsolete? sponsor surveyed 
a number of New York buyers and syndicators on this ques- 
tion and the average prediction Was: four years. Two reasons 
for perishability which were cited most: (1) changing styles 
in women's clothes and coiffures; (2) rapid change in autos. 

*(See syndicated film ratings chart on previous page.) 

PlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllM 

SPONSOR 



as 




23 FEBRUARY 1953 



MEET THE TWIN CITIES 9 
GREATEST LOAFERS! 



"Loaf" means something very different to the Holsum Bread 
Bakery of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Thanks to a precedent- 
setting series of 26 brand-neic half-hour films, created 
expressly for television, these two hilarious fellows are 
busily selling hread all over this great Northwest market. 

What's more . . . they're also selling Fords in San Francisco, 
Chevrolets in New York, Hoffman television sets out on the 
Coast, Pfeiffer Beer in the Midwest ... to mention only a few 
of the different local and regional advertisers already spon- 
soring this exclusive MCA-TV series in key television markets. 

the ABBOTT & COSTELLO show 

PRECEDENT-SETTING because . . . 

for the FIRST TIME in television 
history, you — as a local or regional 
advertiser— can now display your 
products within the framework of 
powerful entertainment. Here's a 
caliber show with super audience 
pull and an effectiveness hitherto 
enjoyed only by the largest nation- 
wide advertisers. NOW it can work 
for you — under your exclusive 
sponsorship in your otcn market ! 

For complete details about the TV-tailored Abbott & Costello 
films . . . including availability in your market, cost, and 
audition screenings . . . contact the nearest of these MCA-TV 
offices— 

another advertising SHOWCASE by 

\IU YORK: S9S Madison tvenue PLaza 

(lilt ICO: I :■' \orth Michigan I" DElaware 7-1100 

BEVERCi lllll^ 9370 Santa MonicaBtvd CReslvieti 

S IN IK l\< l>< a 10S Montgomery Street EXbrook 2-8922 

CLEVE1 IN" Union Commerce Bldg. CHerr) 

DALLAS: 2102 North [hard Street PROspe, 

DETROIT 1612 /<.»•'. rowei WOodward 2-2604 

BOSTON IS Veietnr) Street CO pie) 7-5830 

WINN/ tPOLlS: Northwestern Bank Bldg l.l\<aln 7863 

59 






./ 



I ■ *•:' 






AN AYE FO 




w 



07 



vy 









That's the verdict for Jeffrey Jones, TV's 
fastest-moving private eye. And it's unanimous 
with viewers and sponsors, the country over. 

In less than eight months on the air, "Files of 
Jeffrey Jones" has soared into Telepulse's Top 
Five syndicated film shows. Current ratings : 
Chicago, 20.4, Boston, 16.6, San Francisco, 17.8, 
Pittsburgh, 50.5 (December, 1952). 

And sponsors in more than 25 TV markets 
concur. Jeff has successfully sold biscuits, bread, 
pharmaceuticals, radios, automobiles, gasoline, 
beer, milk, laundry service, many other products. 

With "Files of Jeffrey Jones," you have action 
that gets a big reaction ... from the cast (starring 
TV-movie-and-Broadway hero Don Haggerty) 
through scripts (39 half-hour mystery adventures 
of a sports-minded private eye whose favorite 
game is murder) to production (by Hollywood's 
Lindsley Parsons). 

For top TV results in your local and regional 
markets — at a cost that'll make you cheer — ask 
the CBS Television Film Sales representative 
nearest you about Jeff now. 

FILES OF JEFFREY JONES 

a presentation of CBS television film sales with offices in 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Memphis 

m.s.i avaii.ahi.k : Cases of Eddn I 'nil.. I ulso starring Don Haggerty), Annie Oah 
CrownTheatre with Gloria Swanson, Hollywood on the Line, World's Immortal Operas, 

Holidaii in I '(iris. The Gene Aui r, t SI,,,,, . Stra :■■■ Adventure and The Range Rider 





rOOD PRODUCTS 




SPORTING GOODS 




SPONSOR: Helwig & Leitch, in< . AGENCY: Harrison Pitt, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Helwig & Leitch, a Balti- 
more food manufacturer, wanted better distribution, bet- 
ter grocer cooperation in merchandising its products. 
The firm bought a half-hour weekly daytime show, Block 
Party, on WMAR-TV. During two years of continuous 
participation, the firm has gotten distribution in 300 netv 
grocery stores. Floor displays and sampling campaigns 
in the new outlets also have helped skyrocket sales. Groc- 
ers" interest increased with the aid of TV. 

WMAR-TV, Baltimore PROGRAM: Block Party 


SPONSOR: Pennsylvania Rubber Co. AGENCY: D"Arcy Adv. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On behalf of its distribu- 
tors in the New York area, the Pennsylvania Rubber Co. 
la subsidiary of the General Tire Co.), sponsored the 
15-minute Harry Wismer sportscast on WOR-TV across 
the board. Over nine months. Wismer has plugged about 
100 area sporting goods dealers on the show. In addition, 
Wismer made 20 one-minute announcements each week 
for the firm. As a result of the simultaneous campaigns, 
local sales doubled within these nine months. 

WOR-TV, New York PROGRAM: Harry Wismer Sports 

Announcement 


'< 


HI 


COOKIES 




1 


TV 

results 




SPONSOR: Cal Ray Bakeries AGENCY: R. W. Webster 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Five months ago, a Glen- 
dale. Cal., company, Cal Ray Bakeries, launched a satura- 
tion announcement campaign over KHJ-TV. It signed for 
10 10-second spots a day, across the board. A recent 
survey showed that 6~ r i of all area TV homes had lis- 
tened to the sales pitch: that 45.9% of all TV homes 
purchased Cal Ray cookies for the first time during the 
five-month period. Increased purchases were recorded 
among 45 r < of TV homes who were old Cal Ray buyers. 
Total sales volume was up 21%. 

KHJ-TV, Los Angel.- PROGRAM: Announcement 


FURNITURE 


CHILDREN'S ROOKS 


SPONSOR: Modem House Home AGENCY: Creamer & Co. 
Furnishings Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To boost business in the 
traditionally poor furniture sales month of February, the 
Modern House Home Furnishings Co. contracted to spon- 
sor Les Malloy's Preview Party on KGO-TV. Total in- 
vestment for the show, aired Tuesdays from 10:00 to 
11:30 p.m., was $400. During the month, the firm sold 
over 79 units as a direct result of the telecast. At better 
than $150 per unit, sales traceable to the program totaled 
more than $11,850. 

{ KGO-TV, San Francisco PROGRAM: Preview Partv 


SPONSOR: F. & R. Lazarus Co. Bookshop AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A Columbus, Ohio, book- 
store, the F. & R. Lazarus Co. Bookshop, offered a set of 
six children s books on Aunt Fran and Her Playmates 
over WBNS-TV as a special designed to test the strength 
of its viewing audience. The announcement calling atten- 
tion to the set of books was made on Friday. By Satur- 
day afternoon, Lazarus reported the original order of 
300 books was gone, and a reorder of twice that amount 
had been placed to meet the heavy demand. 

WBNS-TV, Columbus, Ohio PROGRAM: Aunt Fran and 

Her Playmates 




DANCE LESSONS 


ROOKLET OFFER 




SPONSOR: Ray Quinlan Dance Studios \GENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Expenditures of $350 a 
week on non-TV advertising were getting poor results for 
the Ray Quinlan Dance Studios. Dropping all other 
media, the Studios tried one announcement on Jackson's 
Late-Late Theatre, on KTTI . at 2:15 a.m. By 4:15 a.m.. 
15 i iewers hud phoned the studio. Hall the callers signed 
up for courses at a minimum of $400 per course. Since 
that tunc Ray Quinlan has used one announcement a 
week, at a weekly cost of $65. lie reports better than a 
loir , increase in business. 

KTTV, Los Angeles PROGRAM: Announcement 


SPONSOR: Pepperell Mfg. Co. AGENCY: Benton & Bowles 

CAPSI LE CASE HISTORY: As a key feature of its Au- 
gust White Sale promotion, the Pepperell Manufacturing 
Co. planned to make a free offer of a booklet on the care 
and selection of sheets and blankets. The company signed 
for a one-minute announcement on the Dave Garroway 
show, Today, over NBC TV. At a cost of $2,400. the offer 
reached viewers in 37 cities, bringing over 2.400 re- 
sponses. Since the company considers each person re- 
(/uesling a booklet as a prospective customer, it feels the 
$1 per customer well spent. 

NBC TV PROGRAM: Today 





KEY 



o 



Succe 



ssful Advertising 



- 



1 



in 



Delaware 



market 



^ 




' 



WDEL 



WDEL-TV is not just a television station. 
It is a vital, motivating influence throughout 
its viewing area. 

WDEL-TV'S viewers offer a tremendous ad- 
vertising profit potential. They are a constant, 
loyal audience. They have unlimited faith in 
WDEL-TV because of its active part in the life 
of the communities it serves. Backing this skillful 
local programming, WDEL-TV presents all top 
NBC shows. 

WDEL -TV'S market has more money per 
capita to spend than any other market in the 
United States. Current Department of Commerce 
Report places the Delaware market first in aver- 
age personal income. 

BUY WDEL-TV 

Wilmington, Delaware 

your key to this richest of markets 

A Steinman Station 
Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER Associates 

New York Chicago Los Angeles San Francisco 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



63 





What special problems does a UHF station face in 
building an audience and what are you doing to 
solve them? 



Carl W. Lichtenfels 



Advertising Director 
Gemex Corp. 
Union. N. J. 




The 

picked panel 

answers 

Mr. Lielifenfels 

Untimely c o n - 
cepts that prob- 
lems exist that 
are especially pe- 
culiar to UHF 
should not be 
fostered; it can 
be compared to 
conversion to au- 
tomatic transmis- 
sion in the auto- 
mobile industry. 
Were it necessary to limit myself to 
the listing of a single "problem," it 
would be the emphasis of the alphabeti- 
cal description "UHF." Classification 
of channels from 14 to 85 as highest, 
band television could have been more 
fortunate. These frequencies are sim- 
ply TV assignments of later historic 
development than channels 2 to 13. 
Alphabetical differentiation should not 
have been adopted and stressed. U to 
V has encouraged a distinction between 
Alley and Persian cat varieties, when 
both are television assignments requir- 
ing comparable equipment, investment 
and business application. 

Accordingly, wq will not write about 
problems associated with "UHF." But 
we will list brief experiences and obser- 
vations by one engaged in a TV opera- 
tion in the higher frequency spectrum. 
In the very first place, the public, 
advertiser, and agency must be con- 

sponsor invited the key men at nil mi 
of the UHF stations on the air prior to 1 
January 1953 to take part in this oanel. 
Only one, WSBT-TV, South Bend, ln<l. was 
not able to participate. 



vinced that a channel 45 is television. 
And that it is in no way different in 
rendering a picture-signal and enter- 
tainment than the pre-freeze operations. 

Next, the manufacturer of receivers 
must be as diligent in providing the 
means of conversion as he is in inter- 
esting the public in new models and 
larger screens. 

Additionally, dealers and service 
personnel must be supplied with and 
gain experience, and knowledge in high- 
er frequency conversion. 

Finally, survey work plus personal 
observation by agency and client must 
coordinate with the station operator's 
factual reports on a station's actual 
coverage area. 

In summary : We see that our task in 
the highest frequency spectrum is to 
eliminate any concept that it is a prob- 
lem. Rather, it is an unfortunately de- 
layed second phase of TV development 
(arrested from 1949 to 1952) which 
will bring fine, clear, dependable tele- 
vision for the first time on a truly na- 
tionwide basis. 

Fred Weber 
President 
WFPG-TV 
Atlantic City, N. J. 



WBRE-TV start- 
ed promoting its 
advent into TV 
some six years 
ago when it be- 
lieved that its 
grant was first 
i m m i n e n t . 
Through demon- 
strations of long 
distance TV at its 
transmitter site 
to clients, the press and the general 




Mr. Baltimore 



public, we built up a strong desire for 
the medium. 

To watch the Friday night fights on 
WNBT 100 miles away we often crowd- 
ed over 200 people into our FM (and 
someday to be TV) transmitter room. 
In 1949, fringe area reception became 
an experimenter's delight, and sets be- 
gan to fill the area. The pictures were 
generally poor, however. When news 
of our long-awaited on-the-air date was 
announced, the public was eager and 
ready for TV, UHF or no. 

Just how eager the public was was 
evidenced by some 10,000 phone calls 
we answered in the five days preceding 
our on-the-air date. 

Meetings with distributors soon con- 
vinced the dubious ones that we meant 
business when we said "on the air Jan- 
uary 1"; sets began to flow into Wilkes- 
Barre and Scranton. In the area cov- 
ered by our initial power, the signals 
have been excellent and the problems 
few. Reception has been reported as 
far away as 60 miles, a radius we ex- 
pect to cover with ease when our final 
1,000 kw is installed. 

So what's our problem? Convincing 
all the timebuyers and clients that Lou 
Baltimore and hundreds of other old- 
time broadcasters are not investing 
over $2,000,000,000 in equipment they 
didn't think would work well enough 
to be salable as an advertising medium. 

How are we solving this? By telling 
the timebuyers and clients what we be- 
lieve to be the truth. We are telling 
them what our coverage looks like on 
paper . . . and then we tell them what 
we actually have accomplished. We are 
claiming only what is ours to claim. 

David M. Baltimore 
Manager 
WBRE-TV 
Wilkcs-Barre, Pa. 



64 



SPONSOR 




White 



The first station 
to go on the air 
in a new televi- 
sion market faces 
the same prob- 
lems in building 
audience whether 
it be UHF or 
VHF. With the 
increased use of 
receivers with 
continuous t u Ti- 
ers, there will be a large segment of the 
viewing public that will never know the 
difference between UHF and VHF. 
They will be able to tune any channel 
from 2 to 82 with equal ease. 

Good programing is the criteria on 
which any station is judged, and tele- 
viewers will watch the station which 
does the best job of programing with- 
out questioning the electronic princi- 
ples involved. 

KPTV is building UHF audience in 
Portland by providing the best possi- 
ble entertainment programs, sports 
events, news, and public service. We 
are airing the top shows of each of the 
four major networks, supplemented by 
outstanding spot film programs. Live 
studios should be in operation within 
30 days in which we will present local 
news, home economic shows, inter- 
views, sports, other local appeal pro- 
grams. This will give KPTV a well- 
rounded schedule which will have 
something to suit every taste. 

Charles R. White 

Manager 

KPTV 

Portland, Ore. 



Any UHF station 
going on the air 
in an area where 
there has been 
VHF saturation 
immediately faces 
the problem of 
conversion. To 
accomplish a high 
rate of conver- 
sion, the UHF 
testation must make 
up its mind to promote, promote, pro- 
mote — even before the station begins 
operation. At WSBA-TV, we have used 
— and continue to use — many means of 
promotion, including tie-ins with TV 
dealers and distributors. 

As converted sets multiply, there nat- 
urally must be something on the UHF 
{Please turn to page 97) 




Mr. Eberly 



ALWAYS mSf 
ON THE SCENE! 




v"^ '■■ i "^""c* 



WDSU-TV— Louisiana's first television station— is first 
in more ways than one! 

Our coverage of the recent multi-million dollar Gulf 
of Mexico fire is a typical example. WDSU-TV was 
first on the scene to report and take pictures of the 
event. Our "Esso Reporter" not only beat all local 
opposition to coverage of the fire, but also provided 
the tv networks with first pictures for national cover- 
age of the big story. 

This is another sure-fire indication of our intention 
to be first on the scene always! 









• Write, Wire 
or Phone 
BLAIR-TV! 







23 FEBRUARY 1953 



65 




TEffpON 




complete 



coverage 

BECAUSE 

ITS POWER IS NOW 
50,000 WATTS. 

IT HAS A NEW TOWER 
1914 FT. ABOVE SEA LEVEL. 

IT IS CENTRAL NEW YORK'S 
MOST POWERFUL TV STATION. 

IT IS LOCATED IN THE 
HEART OF AN 
INDUSTRIAL AREA 

SEE YOUR NEAREST 
KATZ AGENCY 



(WHEN 

TELEVISION 

\smcvsE, 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
A MEREDITH STATION 




agency profile 



Art Durum 

Radio-TV director 
Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc. 



Looking over the Fuller & Smith & Ross list of predominantly in- 
dustrial accounts you wonder how the agency managed to ring up 
over $3 million in radio-TV billings in 1952. And when you discover 
that air media will get close to $6 million out of the agency this 
year you can't help but be impressed. 

The answer is simple. Since Art Duram became radio-TV direc- 
tor of the agency in January 1952 a number of F&S&R clients have 
come to believe in Arts philosophy: "TV has all the assets of com- 
peti;ive media and it reaches more people. The value of TV as an 
advertising medium is limited only by the imagination of its users. 
And there's nothing like it for telling a complicated story." 

There were a lot of raised eyebrows when the news was an- 
nounced that Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. was going to use Arthur 
Gocfrey to sell fiberglas home insulation. But when Godfrey started 
to tell housewives how they could buy a fur coat on the money they'd 
save on fuel bills by using fiberglas insulation, the angle not only 
made sense but sold insulation. Selling oil-burner filters was a cinch 
when Godfrey told housewives they would cut down on house-ducting. 

The motives for the use of TV by another industrial account, 
y\lcoa, are generally misunderstood, according to Art. "There's no 
ques'ion that Edward R. Murrow's See It Now has definite prestige 
value, but what few people realize is that the program's commercials 
reach a large number of architects, contractors, and manufacturers 
whom we wish to educate in new uses for aluminum. Godfre\ also is 
used to plug the firm's oil-burner filters (cut down on dust I as well 
as the line of fiberglas curtain-; and draperies. 

Art is reallv sold on the versatility of television. He told sponsor: 
"It's a medium you can put to any use. whether your aim be sales, 
public relations, education, or promotion. And the beauty of it is 
that vou can show the product not only in use but in its natural 
environment." 

No newcomer to air media, Art started as a radio sports announcer 
right after graduating from the U. of Illinois. He acted in soap 
operas for a while, headed up a radio spurts s! a II. worked in summer 
stock for a couple of seasons, and finally got in the sales end of radio. 
Before joining F&S&R to organize a radio-TV department in New 
York, he was with CBS for six years in various capacities, ended his 
tenure while Faslern Sales Manager for CBS TV. 

Art. who lives with his wife and five-year-old son Michael in Chap- 
paqua, N. Y., enjoys golf and skiing. * * * 



66 



SPONSOR 



All It Took was a Bored Horde . . . 




. . . And the Kubli Khan's fear that inactivity would Muni the fighting 
edge of his Asiatic conquerers, to send Mongol hordes swarming into 
southeastern Europe. 

KOWH's solution for boredom is less drastic, but equally effective in 
rallying a horde of Omaha, Council Bluffs listeners to its banner. Proof? 
Slant a glance the below Hooper, averaged for the 14-month span from 
October, 1951, to November, 19521 If you're interested in invading our 
baliwick, give us a growl ! 



35.9% 




Largest total audience 
of any Omaha station, 
8. A.M. to 6 P.M. Mon- 
day thru Saturday! 
(Hooper, Oct. 1951, 
thru Nov., 1952.) 

Largest share of audi- 
ence, in any individual 
time period, of any in- 
dependent station in 
all America! (Nov., 
1952.) 



Sta. "A" Sta. "B" 



OTHER 
STATION RATINGS 



Sta. "C" 



Sla. "D" 

Sta. "E" 



a 



[MS 



O M A 



"America's Most Listened-to Independent Station" 



General Manager, Todd Storz; Represented Nationally By The BOILING CO. 



Illillliliill il 










Aoic the city water department is measuring TV atuliences 



Heretofore TV audiences have been 
measured by such techniques as tele- 
phone coincidental, diary, and aided- 
recall interview. But an entirely new 
method of gauging program (and com- 
mercial) popularity was recently dis- 
covered in Detroit by someone totally 
unconnected with the broadcast indus- 
try: the general manager of Detroit's 
Department of Water Supply. 

According to this gentleman, Lau- 
rence G. Lenhardt, the variations in the 
city's water pressure are a good index 
to the use of TV. The board of water 
commissioners, it seems, keeps graphs 
to index the vagaries of the water sup- 
ply and demand. When the taps are 
opened and the waters flow freely, the 
pressure goes down. But when the 
pressure maintains an even balance 
over a period of time, it indicates that 



a great body of people is giving at 
tention to something outside of the 
kitchen or bath. In the course of a nor- 
mal evening, this "something," Len- 
hardt is certain, is television. 

At the time that many commercials 
come on, reports Lenhardt, the graphs 
tend to become agitated in a minus di- 
rection, indicating a sudden rise in the 
use of water. 

It was a Detroit News columnist, 
George W. Stark, who accidentally 
stumbled on this situation and de- 
scribed it in a recent column. He men- 
tioned that the water pressure graphs 
on a Sunday evening, for instance, 
show a "steady, undiluted attention" 
to Fred Waring, Toast of the Town 
and Mr. Peepers. 

What do you say, Nielsen and 
Pulse? • * • 



Toys are year-- round item, says firm; starts post-Yule push 



Toy companies are expected to — and 
generally do — step up their selling ef- 
forts before Christmas. But the Play- 
skool Manufacturing Co. of Philadel- 
phia, flouting convention, launched a 
promotional push via TV right after 
holiday peak selling. 

Playskool, makers of Lincoln Logs 
(toy replicas of logs and shingles used 
by American pioneers) contends that 
children require toys all during the 
year, not just at special gift seasons 
and on birthdays. Consequently, it 
premiered a program for youngsters on 
WCAU-TV, Philadelphia,' late in Jan- 
uary. A half-hour weekly Saturday 
a.m. stanza, The Pioneer Playhouse 
features the "Lincoln Logs Building 
Contest" and a Gene Aulry serial film. 
In the course of each show, five young- 
sters are seen actually constructing dif- 
ferent projects with the logs — a natu- 
ral and vivid product demonstration — 
and a prize goes to the boy or girl 
who completes the best project by the 
end of the show. 

The youngsters get applications to 
enter the on-the-air contest from local 



toy and department stores where Lin- 
coln Logs are sold. Many of the stores 
are promoting the applications (and 




Show incorporates vivid product demonstration 

the show) via window and interior dis- 
plays; Wanamaker's has pitched it in 
newspaper ads. 

According to Playskool's agency, 
Friend-Reiss-McGlone, New York, the 
promotion has met with enthusiastic 
reception so far. Depending on con- 
tinued success, Plavskool plans to make 
the show network later on and enlarge 
the Lincoln Logs Building Contest into 
a national event. * * * 



Sponsor bankrolls KTT\ 
special events only 

In January 1952, the General Pe- 
troleum Corp., Cak, signed a somewhat 
unique contract with KTTV, Los An- 
geles: They were to sponsor automati- 
cally any and all unscheduled special 
events telecast by KTTV during 1952. 

In the course of the year, the spon- 
sorship has included on-the-spot re- 
porting by the station of such happen- 
ings as the January floods, the Bakers- 
field and Tehachapi earthquakes, Gen- 
eral Eisenhower's arrival in Los An- 
geles, election coverage throughout the 
city, the Tournament of Roses Parade. 

At no time on the telecasts has the 
company tried to sell its products (auto 
and industrial oils and greases) direct- 
ly, according to General Petroleum 
Advertising Director F. C. Meunier. 
Rather it has stuck to a policy of sim- 
ple sponsor identification for which, 
says Meunier, it has been highly com- 
mended by the public. By its public 
service sponsorship, the company is 
primarily interested in making itself 
better and more favorably known in 
the community, Meunier points out. 

That sales have not exactly suffered 
from this approach is evidenced by the 
fact that last month, General Petrole- 
um renewed its contract for another 
52 weeks — with indications that it 
plans to continue the arrangement for 
a long time to come in view of "over- 
whelming listener acceptance.' In the 
new contract, KTTV's "roving com- 
mission" for the company is extended 
and amplified, says T. L. Stromberger, 
v.p. of West-Marquis, the ad agency. 

The contract was negotiated between 
Meunier, Stromberger, and Leslie H. 
Norins. KTTV account executive. 

• • * 

Alaska sponsors may buy 
California station time 

The Village Morgue Cocktail Bar 
and other businesses in Valdez, Alaska, 
wanted to do a little radio advertising. 
But they discovered that due to terrain 
and other difficulties, local Alaska ra- 
dio stations were ge'.ting little or no 
reception in the area. 

They found, however, that station 
KFBK from Sacramento, Cak, some- 
how gets through quite well to Valdez. 
So Dale Kinsell. owner of the Village 
Morgue, in cooperation with Max 
Wills, of Wells Commercial Co.. and 
O. J. Rockway. public accountant, both 
also in Valdez, wrote a letter to KFBK 



68 



SPONSOR 



requesting rates and other information. 
.Would the station accept advertising 
from that area? How much would an- 
nouncements preceding a show called 
Stan's Drive In (a KFBK midnight 
stanza heard in Valdez at about 10:00 
p.m.) cost, and could more than one 
advertiser sponsor a single pitch? 

KFBK sales manager Perry Nelson 
reports that the station has duly quoted 
times and rates, looks forward to carry- 
ing the advertising of Valdez, Alaska, 
sponsors. * * • 



Briefly . . . 

The March of Time series, spon- 
sored by the Miller Brewing Co. on 
over 49 TV stations on a spot basis, 
is presenting "profiles" of various cit- 
ies around the U.S. First city to be 




WDSU gave Miiler-sponsored show buildup 

highlighted was New Orleans. When 
the film "New Orleans — Gateway to the 
World" was scheduled to run on 
WDSU-TV 31 January, that day offi- 
cially was proclaimed (by city offi- 
cials) March of Time Day in New Or- 
leans. For having gone all out to pro- 
mote such a civic-minded film project, 
WDSU executives Edgar B. Stern Jr., 
pres. (photo, center) and Robert D. 
Swezey, exec. v.p. (second from 1.), 
received a special scroll from the May- 
or of New Orleans, DeLesseps S. Mor- 
son (second from r.). Earlier, Frank 
Shea (extreme 1.), March of Time rep- 
resentative, and George Gill, adver- 
tising director of Miller Brewing, pre- 
sented the mayor with a copy of the 
film for future use. 

* * * 

Over 1.000,000 entries from high 
schools throughout the nation and its 
territories poured in to the sixth an- 
nual Voice of Democracy contest. This 
month, four students — from California, 
the District of Columbia, Hawaii and 
New York — were named co-equal win- 
ners for writing and voicing the best 
(Please turn to page 9] I 




HERE'S THE OUTSTANDING 
LINEUP NOW ON KGMB-TV 



I LOVE LUCY 
BURNS & ALLEN 
ARTHUR GODFREY 
OZZIE & HARRIET 
STUDIO ONE 

HOLLYWOOD WRESTLING 
BLUE RIBBON BOUTS 
HOPALONG CASSIDY 
AMOS 'N' ANDY 
HOLIDAY IN HAWAII 
BOSTON BLACKIE 
ALL STAR REVUE 
FRED WARING 
YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS 
MARTIN KANE 
RACKET SQUAD 
JEFF JONES 
HANK McCUNE 
JACK BENNY 
ABBOTT & COSTELLO 



PAN AMERICAN 
WORLD NEWS 
FOUR-STAR PLAYHOUSE 
DENNIS DAY 
TIME FOR BEANY 
PLAYHOUSE OF STARS 
KIT CARSON 
THE UNEXPECTED 
BIFF BAKER 
TERRY & THE PIRATES 
BLUE FLAME THEATRE 
WHITEMAN'S TV TEEN CLUB 
THE NAME'S THE SAME 
GENE AUTRY 
YOU ASKED FOR IT 
TOOTSIE HIPPODROME 
RANGE RIDER 
KIERAN'S KALEIDOSCOPE 
TONIGHT IN HONOLULU 
POPO, THE WEATHER MAN 



Choice times 


are going 


fast! 






FREE AND PETERS can 


still obtair 


i one 


for 


you. 


Call them today. 









i lK wL» l^d( L ■ ^P^ y »d.jddi i |^^ 



CHANNEL 9 



CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



69 



TIMEBUYERS' GUIDE TO UHF 

(Continued from page 34) 

the dead spot areas. 

In the second place, the problem of 
reception is also a problem of how 
much power a station can radiate. 
Some of the obstructions and inter- 
ference to a good UHF signal can be 
overcome by more power. In effect, 
this also means the signal will travel 
farther. While the Portland coverage 
estimates will not apply to a city with 
a different terrain, it should be pointed 



out that KPTV used a low-power trans- 
mitter — only 1 kw. A higher antenna 
can also increase the station's coverage 
in the area. 

What effect higher-power transmit- 
ters will have on dead spots caused by 
hills and tall buildings is not known 
exactly. That's why everybody is 
watching what will happen at Read- 
ing's WHUM-TV, which is preparing 
to use a 12 kw. transmitter with an 
ERP of 260 kw. (and may be on the 
air by the date of this issue I . 



to cash in on the $730,000,000 

Charleston, W. Va. market 




You're talking to more 
than $730,000,000 when 
you're on WKNA. And 
you're speaking with a 
power-packed voice that 
saturates the market 
completely and authorita- 
tively. See how an amaz- 
ingly low cost spot of 
"personality" can produce 
amazingly high returns. 



Herei WKNA's hall millivolt area alone. 

TOTAL POPULATION 

TOTAL FAMILIES 

RETAIL SALES 

FOOD SALES 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE SALES 



671,178 

186,235 

$407,643,000 

$ 86.621,000 

$ 57,711,000 



FURNITURE & HOUSEHOLD GOODS SALES $ 22,968,000 
EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME $730,771,000 

Source-US. Census ond BMB Survey, 1950 



-y.-: 



' 1 



OH WKUK 



WKNA is also sold as part of West Virginia's 


, 


WKNA WKNA-FM WJLS WJLS-FM 




Charleston 950 KC B«?(kley — 560 KC 


/ 


5000 W Doy • 1000 W Night 1000 W Doy • 500 W Night 


/ 


ABC Radio Network Affiliate CBS Radio Network Affiliate 




Joe L. Smith, Jr., Incorporated • Represented Nationally by 


WEED & CO. 



<?• What does ERP mean? 

■A. There has been a lot of talk 
about ERP and a number of miscon- 
ceptions, too. ERP means "effective 
radiated power" or sometimes "equiv- 
alent radiated power." Here's the basic 
idea in a nutshell : 

Suppose you have a bulb rated at 25 
watts. The light given off by this bulb 
radiates in all directions. If you want 
the light to shine only on your desk, a 
lot of the light obviously is wasted. So 
you take a reflector and put it over the 
bulb. Practically all the light is then 
directed down to your desk. You take 
measurements and find that the light 
shining on your desk is equivalent to 
that given off by a 125-watt bulb with- 
out a reflector. You thus have a gain 
of five-to-one and an effective radiated 
power of 125 watts. 

More or less the same thing is done 
to TV signals. TV wave radiation 
goes in all directions, including up, 
where there are no TV sets. Engineers 
have been able to flatten out the TV 
signal into waves that are mostly hori- 
zontal, so that the signals fan out from 
the transmitting antenna like a pan- 
cake. The compressing of the TV sig- 
nals results in a gain of power in the 
direction in which the signals are 
going, or a greater ERP. 

This multiplication of power is ac- 
complished at the station's transmitting 
antenna. What the engineers do, in ef- 
fect, is to pile a number of antennae, 
one on top of the other, atop the tower. 
Since UHF waves are smaller than 
VHF waves, these individual anten- 
nae are smaller. Therefore, more of 
them can be used and a greater gain in 
signal power or ERP can be gotten. 
Roughly speaking, UHF antenna gain 
can be about twice that of VHF an- 
tenna gain. UHF stations now on the 
air are getting an antenna gain of 
about 20-to-one, give or take a few 
points. WHUM-TV is figuring on a 
gain of nearly 22-to-one with its 12 kw. 
Klystron tube transmitter. 

Q- If hat is a Klystron tube? 

A- The important fact to timebuy- 
ers is that the Klystron tube is a way 
of generating the higher power re- 
quired for good UHF reception. It is 
basically a vacuum tube but it is and 
looks quite different from standard TV 
transmitting equipment. It has been 
used in receivers before, but the tube 
used in Heading, built by CE, repre- 
sents the first time it will be used for 



70 



SPONSOR 




w? 



oA9 



& 



How Harveys built a market 
twelve times the size of Nashville . 

Ten years ago Harveys was a department store with a piddling 40 feet front 
on Nashville's Church Street and a paltry half million annual volume. Today 
Harveys stretches 300 feet to fill most of a block, does a million a month. 

How did it happen? Here's what Fred Harvey, president of Harveys, has to say: 
"Casting aside the horse and buggy concept of what a Retail Trading Zone 
should be, we went after an area twelve times the size of Nashville. We 
talked to this area over WSM, the one medium capable of converting 
geography into a market. We could have bought other stations cheaper, but 
we wanted results and that's what WSM delivered, and continues to deliver." 

The fact that the phrase "It's Fun To Shop At Harveys" is heard all over the 
Central South ... the fact that people come from all over to see and buy at 
fabulous Harveys ... is ample evidence that WSM delivers at the retail level, too. 

For the full Harveys story, ask Irving Waugh or any Petry man. 
It's an eye-opener. 



WSM 



Nashville 

Clear Channel • 50,000 Watts 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



IRVING WAUGH Commercial Manager • EDWARD PETRY & CO. National Representative 

7T 



Colorado's On 
COMPLETE % 

Broadcasting Service 



' ■ ■ 



H»C o«f 



D«*OHl 



Represented by 

JOHN BLAIR 

and BL AIR-TV 




^^ 



Managed by 
GENE OFALLON 



n San Amonio 
if you use. 



. . . you sell Spanish- 
speaking people using 
Spanish - language 
radio! 



M 








2/Q 



VA 



© 



ioV 



Remember! Over 50% 
of the people in the 
San Antonio area 
speak Spanish! 

For the new Belden 
Latin - American 
Survey regarding: 

Radio Listening 
Buying Power 
Brand Preferences 

write 




S PAN I SH - LANGUAGE 
WATERS . 



301 South FlorcS 

Te«as' First and Most Powerful 

Spanish language Station 

Represented nationally by 
Richard O'Connell — New York 
rlort J. Ookes & Associates — West Coast / 

»ii"m' n"n -ii ' 1 



— >— . 



high-power transmission. One argu- 
ment in its favor is that it is economi- 
cal because it doesn't require a lot of 
extra tubes to get more power. As a 
matter of fact, the transmitter is prac- 
tically all one tube. However, some 
broadcasters are wary of it for just 
that reason. They feel that keeping 
spares on hand means, in effect, the 
expense of keeping whole transmitters. 

WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., now 
on the air with 18.5 kw. ERP, has an 
order with RCA for a 10 kw. transmit- 
ter which will give 200 kw. ERP and is 
scheduled for delivery this June. Dave 
Baltimore, station manager, said so 
far as he knows it will not be a Klys- 
tron tube transmitter. The station, 
however, is looking toward an eventual 
ERP of 1,000 kw., the highest per- 
mitted by the FCC. This will require 
a transmitter power of 50 kw. While 
even RCA has not decided what kind 
of transmitter to use, it is understood 
that a Klystron tube is a possibility. 

The meaning of all this is that engi- 
neers are still experimenting with eco- 
nomical ways of getting higher power. 
While UHF station broadcasters know 
they can get better coverage with high- 
er-power transmitters, the problem still 
remains whether the additional cover- 
age will warrant spending the money. 

0« Are there differences between 
VHF and UHF home reception? 

A. As indicated early in the article, 
the consumer will be able to detect no 
difference between a UHF and a VHF 
picture. In some ways UHF is better 
because it is less subject to interference 
from electric motors, automobiles, air- 
planes, and diathermy machines, but 
such interference is not a real prob- 
lem with VHF. There is still a slight 
matter of circuit "noise" in UHF sets. 
This is not really noise, but its effect on 
a TV picture is comparable to the hum 
of a radio set. It can never be extin- 
guished entirely. It has been cut down 
considerably in VHF sets and engi- 
neers are confident that in a short time 
it will be cut down in UHF sets. 

<?• Can a UHF signal go as far as a 
VHF signal? 

A. While the effective distance a 
UHF signal will travel will tend to be 
cut down more than a VHF signal by 
obstructions, this can be overcome to 
a great extent by higher power trans- 
mitters and antenna gain. It is even 
hoped that bad dead spots can be 



"? 



SPONSOR 



what makes 



WLAC 








^> 



Mr. Lee Jones, Sales Manager of Washington Manufac- 
turing Company, makers of Washington Dee Cee work 
clothing, Guymont and Deer Creek sport shirts, says, 
In 16 days we received 50,626 pieces of mail! That to 
me is SELLING POWER PLUS! From 6:00 to 6:15 AM, 
Monday thru Saturday with Andy Wilson, we used only a 
one minute spot to attain this remarkahle record. It's 
no wonder we at Washington believe WLAC is Nashville's 
station with sales power.' 



5» 



When WLAC Clicks . . . Its Advertisers Click, Too! 

Whether we are selling workclothes, watches, chickens 
... or any other merchandise . . . WLAC Programs with 
Personalities hold and SELL radio listeners. 

The Nashville SALES Power Station 

CBS RADIO 50,000 WATTS 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

For further information contact The Katz Agency, Inc., 
National Advertising Representatives 



23 FEBRUARY 1953 



73 



The "PUBLIC 




J ■ 



n PUBLIC SERVICE 



PUBLIC:— "Of, pertaining to, or affecting 

the people at large, or the community." 

— Funk & Wagnalls New 

College Standard Dictionary 



A hospital in a neighboring community, in urgent need of a rare type of 
blood, asked Storer Station WMMN, Fairmont, W. Va., to make an appeal 
for donors. 

The station immediately began broadcasting one-minute announcements. 
After only three of these announcements had gone on the air, the hospital 
called and asked that they be stopped. Reason: the waiting room of the 
hospital was jammed with 50 people who had answered the appeal. 



Yes, 50 "people at large," "people of the community," every one of them 
having the rare blood type needed, had paused in the midst of their daily 
pursuits and had gone to the hospital to offer their blood. Because of their 
immediate response, the lives of at least six people were saved. 

The prompt action of Station WMMN in broadcasting the appeal is typi- 
cal of the services rendered the community by every one of the Storer sta- 
tions, dedicated since 1927 to "Broadcasting in the Public Interest." 

The seven radio and four television stations of the Storer Broadcasting 
Company pledge their wholehearted and responsive support to every cause, 
drive and campaign that will serve "the people at large, or the community." 




STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

"The Public Service Stations'" 

WSPD-TV — WJBK-TV — WAGA-TV -— KEYL-TV 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. San Antonio, Texas 

WMMN — WSPD — WJBK — WAGA -- WWVA — WGBS — WSAI 

Fairmont, W. Va. Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. Wheeling, W. Va. Miami, Fla. Cincinnati, Ohio 

TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director 
NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
488 Madison Ave., New York 22, ELdorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, FRanklin 2-6498 



partly filled in with high power trans- 
mitters by means of reflecting waves 
off of nearby buildings or hills into 
these dead spots. 

Many UHF stations are in the small- 
er markets and, if there aren't too 
many obstructions, the signal distance 
isn't too important. Within a 20-mile 
radius of the transmitting antenna, 
UHF reception is generally no prob- 
lem. Several UHF stations have re- 
ported that some homes within a 20- 
mile radius have received good sig- 
nals even without an antenna. 



When you get out to 30, 40, and 50 
miles the combination of home loca- 
tion, proper installation and transmit- 
ter power will determine reception. 
There are special UHF antennae being 
made and installed now. They are 
called '"yagi," "rhombic," "broad band 
triangular dipole," etc. The last-men- 
tioned is a common type. It looks like 
a big bow tie stamped out of aluminum 
and is often called a bow-tie antenna. 
For weak signal areas, the bow tie com- 
bined with a reflector has been used. 

One reason proper UHF home in- 



DONT BE FOOLED 




ABOUT ROCHESTER 

IN ROCHESTER 432 weekly quarter hour periods are 
Pulse surveyed and rated. Here's the latest score,— 



FIRSTS. . 


STATION 

WHEC 
254. . 
7. . 


STATION 

B 

. .147. . 
. . 5. . 


STATION 

c 

. .22. . 


STATION 

D 

. . .2. . 


STATION 

E 
. . .0. . 


STATION 

F 

. .0 


TIES 


. . 1 . . 


. . .1 . . 


. . .0 




. .0 










s 
til 


afion on 
punsel only 



WHEC carries ALL of the "top ten" daytime shows! 
WHEC carries NINE of the "top ten" evening shows! 

LATEST PULSE REPORT BEFORE CLOSING TIME 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 



WHEC 



Rtpnuntalivi: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc. N*w York, Chioogo, LEE F. OCONNEU CO;, loi Ange/et, San Fronciic 






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5,000 WATTS 



stallation is important is this: The 
higher the frequency, the greater the 
loss in power in the line between home 
antenna and set. This means the line 
should be as short as possible. It also 
is equally important to find just the 
right spot for a UHF antenna. A dif- 
ference of five feet can make a differ- 
ence in reception. 

The final answer to how far a UHF 
signal will go can only be given with 
examples of actual reception. In Port- 
land, with a low-power transmitter, 
good signals out to 30 miles were 
charted by the Taylor engineering 
team. In Youngstown, Ohio, UHF sta- 
tion WKBN-TV received a photograph 
of a good home TV picture 50 miles 
away (see picture on page 33 I . 

if~ What kind of UHF converters 
are available? 

A. Manufacturers are putting con- 
verters out that can convert the TV set 
to receive one or two UHF channels. 
Since few markets have received more 
than two UHF allocations so far, this 
should be sufficient for most homes. 
However, all-wave converters also are 
being sold. One RCA type, for exam- 
ple, will receive a total of 16 channels, 
both UHF and VHF. That means, in 
actual practice, a maximum of seven 
VHF and nine UHF channels. In ad- 
dition, an increasing number of sets 
are being produced with built-in UHF 
reception. Many sets on the market 
have so-called strip tuners, so that a 
serviceman (or the set owner, if he is 
handy) can take out an unused VHF 
station strip and substitute a UHF sta- 
tion strip without difficultv. 

<?• How much do converters cost? 

A. They vary in price from about 
$5 to $15 for the one-channel convert- 
ers up to about $50 for the all-channel 
tuners. 

Q' Are set owners in VHF fringe 
areas converting their sets to receive 
nciv UHF stations in their markets? 

A. This, of course, is the payoff 
question. Where UHF stations have no 
VHF competition, there is good evi- 
dence that new set sales go up at a 
faster rate than VHF set sales did in 
VHF's early days. This is understand- 
able since sets now are cheaper and 
there is more and better TV program- 
ing available to the viewer. 

\\ here there is \ UK fringe competi- 
tion, it is impossible to generalize. 
Researchers can pretty well project a 



76 



SPONSOR 



You've ftund if 




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Good buying action 

will be yours witruthis four leaf clover 
in your broadcast schedule. WERD •- 
stimulates sales. And it's the most 
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WERD listeners have confidence in 
what they hear on their station — the only 
Negro owned and operated radio station 
in the U.S. Their confidence shows where 
it counts most— at the sales counter, 
where they buy the products they 
hear about on WERD. Write for WERD's 
"Proof of Performance." 







RADIO DIVISION 

Interstate United Newspapers, Inc. 

Represented nationally by 

JOE uioonon 

23 FEBRUARY 1953 



WERD 



ATLANTA 



1000 WATTS • 860 ON EVERY ATLANTA DIAL 
J. B. Blayton, Jr., Gen M gr 



77 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S Pfawe&l RADIO STATION 



To receive the equivalent of 

WPBJ Coverage and Penetration 

in Roanoke and Western Virginia 
you'd have to buy at least 
3 other stations! * 

WDBJ TOTAL WEEKLY AUDIENCE 

Day . . . 110,861 Night . . . 92,186 

and 3 or more days and nights 
Day . . . 92,885 Night . . . 67,743 

Compare . . . then call . . . Free & Peters, Inc. 

*Based on SAMS — 1952 



Established 1924 • CBS Since 1929 
AM • 5000 WATTS . 960 KC 
FM . 41,000 WATTS . 94.9 MC 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WOULD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS. INC., National Representatives . 



BMI 



Pin Up Sheet 

YOUR EVERYDAY GUIDE 
TO CURRENT SONG HITS 

The broadcaster faces a 
daily challenge of providing 
the best in recorded musical 
entertainment. 

To help meet this challenge 
BMI issues its monthly "Pin 
Up" sheet of BMI-licensed 
songs which can honestly be 
classed as Hit Tunes. 

Most broadcasting stations 
keep the BMI "Pin Up" sheet 
prominently posted as a con- 
venient reference. Complete 
record information is pro- 
vided, as well as a handy cal- 
endar listing dates and events 
important to broadcasters. 

// you'd like your own 
personal copy — write to 
BMI Promotion Dept. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



K 
W 

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mina 



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1000 WATTS 
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For full particulars Contact 
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sales curve in new TV markets with no 
outside signal. But there are too many 
variables where there is fringe compe- 
tition. It's safe to say that a good pro- 
portion of set owners in a UHF sta- 
tion's Class A coverage area will con- 
vert in short order since such a UHF 
signal is unquestionably better than 
the VHF fringe signal. The situation 
is further complicated in a market like 
Mobile. Ala., where New Orleans comes 
in very weak but where new UHF sta- 
tion WKAB-TV faces new VHF station 
WALA-TV. 

There is at least one indication that 
the number of conversions will exceed 
the purchase of new UHF-equipped 
sets during a UHF station's early davs 



"Agencies make their (program) rec- 
ommendations with a considerable sense 
of public responsibility. . . . Neither the 
advertiser nor the agency can afford to 
offend any substantial part of the broad- 
casting audience and, if they ever do, 
they don't do so for long. Their cus- 
tomers and prospects can too easily vote 
them out of business by not buying their 
products." 

FREDERIC R. GAMBLE 

President 

4 A's 



on the air. Paul H. Raymer Co., rep 
for South Bend's new UHF station, 
WSBT-TV, cited these figures: 

Between 22 November 1952, and 15 
January 1953 (the UHF station went 
on the air 22 December), there was a 
total of 9,510 conversions. During the 
same period, the number of new UHF- 
equipped sets totaled 2,874 (see chart 
page 34). Other sources indicate there 
were about 25,000 VHF sets in South 
Bend in November 1952. 

The WSBT-TV figures were obtained 
from dealers, which is the information 
source for most UHF stations at the 
present time. Advertisers and agencies 
have shown some dissatisfaction with 
such figures and some of the stations 
are preparing to make more exhaustive 
surveys by checking dealers' figures 
with telephone calls, electric company 
figures ( dealers report installations to 
utility firms so that power loads can 
be estimated I and field trips. Among 
the stations preparing such surveys are 
WFPG-TV, Atlantic City, N. J., and 
WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre. 

In areas where community antennae 
are installed, the conversion problem 
is simplified. The community antennae 



7S 



SPONSOR 





NOW. . . AN 
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Add "stretchin"' to the long list of adjectives we use 
to describe singin', strummin', leapin', sellin' Kenny 
Roberts. He's adjustable now! Come 5:00 p.m. every 
weekday, he stretches that explosive personality of 
his all over the Great Southwest (Ohio) Territory 
through the joint facilities of WHIO-TV in Dayton 
and WKRC-TV in Cincinnati. Adjustment takes place 
from 5:25 to 5:45 p.m. That's when Kenny comes in 
three sizes: As big as the big WHIO-TV market — as 
big as the big WKRC-TV market- or as big as both 
(and you buy what you want). 

Put your product anywhere on Kenny's program 
and you'll get real results from a real market that's 
as big as you want it to be. George P. Hollingbery 
has participating spot information on WHIO-TV, 
The Katz Agency represents WKRC-TV. 



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can be adapted to receive UHF sig- 
nals. Instead of relaying the same 
I III" signal, the equipment converts tin- 
signal to an unused VHF frequency, 
which can be received by existing set 
owners without any kind of conver- 
sion. Some UHF stations already have 
aided these community antennae con- 
versions. WHUM-TV expects to add 
40.000 sets to its audience by such 
conversions in the near future. 

*J. How many UHF stations are now 
on the air? 

A. Nine stations were on the air 
when this article went to press, with 
another four expected to broadcast 
commercially by the time the issue ap- 
pears. The nine are WFPG-TV. At- 
lantic City, N. J.; WJTV, Jackson. 
Miss.; WKAB-TV, Mobile, Ala.; 
WEEK-TV, Peoria, 111.: KPTV. Port- 
land, Ore.; WSBT-TV. South Bend. 
Ind.; WBRE-TV. Wilkes-Barre. Pa.; 
WSBA-TV, York. Pa.; WKBN-TV, 
Youngstown, Ohio. The four are 
WKNB-TV. New Britain. Conn.: 
WKST-TV, New Castle. Pa.; WHUM- 
TV. Reading, Pa.; WROV-TV. Roa- 
noke. Va. * * * 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



National Rep. Blair-TV, Inc. 



MASLAND ON TV 

I Continued from page 43) 

ing the TV sales messages to a female 
audience, and reaching into more mar- 
kets to satisfy demands of dealers who 
had not previously been able to cash 
in on TV salesmanship. 

With the pacting of Dave Garroway 
and Garry Moore, Masland now gets 
a double-barreled impact every Mon- 
day. The Today pitch is made at 
about 7:45 a.m., early enough to get a 
fair percentage of husbands before they 
set off for work. The Garry Moore 
message goes out during the 1:30-1:45 
p.m. period, catching a predominately 
female audience. Both Garroway and 
Moore use the homey, warm, person- 
alized approach which Masland prefers 
to the driving, high-powered sales mes- 
sage. \c\ ci thclcss. ! otli perfoi mers. 
especially Moore, have loyal follow- 
ings and the personal endorsement of 
these two stars is believed to be more 
effective than a "cold sell." 

This philosophy is in keeping with 
the high standards set for all phases of 
the television operation by Masland 
president. Frank F. Masland Jr. The 
way he puts it, "There's a matter of 
public trust involved in going into peo- 



ple's homes. Good taste is vital. We 
set high standards for the commercials 
as well as the program content." 

Bearing out this statement is the 
fact that as much as half of the TV 
commercial time is devoted to philoso- 
phy and non-commercial, humanistic 
messages, often gleaned from the com- 
pany's house organ. On one of the 
Tales of Tomorrow programs, for in- 
stance, here's what announcer Allyn 
Edwards had to say by way of an 
opening commercial: 

"Tonight. I'd like to read you a short 
editorial on Mistakes. It's in this 
magazine — "The Shuttle" — put out for 
and by the people who work in the 
Masland Mills. One of the Maslands 
wrote it. and I think it covers the sub- 
ject very clearly. . . . 'To err is human,' 
wrote Alexander Pope, and most of us 
no doubt will agree that people do oc- 
casionally make mistakes. What we 
should strive for is to keep ours at a 
minimum. But when we do make one, 
we ought to be big enough to admit it. 
To make sure we don't repeat it. And 
to profit from what we have done 
wrong. The history of industrial re- 
search reveals occasions where a re- 
searcher — due to a mistake or an over- 




ideal home for permanent tenancy! 
Perfect location (8:30-9:00 a.m. Monday 
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advertiser wishing to reach large wealthy 
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purchases. The KMBC-KFRM "Happy 
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Call, wire or phone your nearest Free and 
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committments are recommended. 



KMBC 

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tor Rural Kansas 



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Here's proof that the Fetzer stations — WKZO-WJEF 
in radio, WKZO-TV in television — are Western 
Michigan's hest advertising buys. 

WKZO-WJEF RADIO 

WKZO, Kalamazoo, and WJEF, Grand Rapids, rank 
among the nation's top radio values. Together they 
deliver about 62.6% more city listeners than the next- 
best two-station choice in these two cities — yet they 
actually cost less! For Total Rated Time Periods 
(February-March, 1952 Hoopers), WJEF gets a 
15.4% greater Share of Audience than its nearest 
competition. And according to the February, 1952 



Pulse, WKZO gets more listeners, morning, noon and 
night, than all other stations combined ! 

WKZO-TV 

WKZO-TV is the Official Basic CBS Television Outlet 
for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids. This is America's 25th 
television market — a bigger TV market than Atlanta. 
New Orleans, Kansas City or Seattle! The December 
1952 Videodex Report credits WKZO-TV with 86.9% 
more afternoon viewers than Western Michigan's 
other TV station — 129.3% more evening viewers! 
Write direct for the whole Fetzer story, or ask Avery- 
Knodel. 



*Dick Miller of Huntington Beach, California, holds this world's record. 




ALL THREE OWNED AND OPERATcu BI 

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New England's 



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Eastern Conn . . . 
Served best 
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Some of Eastern 
Connecticut's big 
installations include 

DOW CHEMICAL 

(Six miles from Nonvich) 

ELECTRIC BOAT CO. 

(Submarines) 

SUB BASE, GROTON 

(Ten miles, nearly 
J 5,000 people) 

PHIZER CHEMICAL 

AMERICAN SCREW CO. 

U. S. FINISHING CO. 

AMERICAN THERMOS CO. 
and hundreds more. 

Here is the #1 Hooper sfaffon 

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sight — has stumbled upon a new dis- 
covery far more important and earth- 
shaking than what he was originally 
seeking. Fortunately for us. these men 
and women have profited by their mis- 
takes. And some of America's most im- 
portant new products have been dis- 
covered in this way. All of us are the 
richer for our mistakes when we admit 
them with humility, and profit by them 
with courage." 

That's it. No sell — not yet. But 
this type of "editorial" has pulled in 
letters galore from viewers, stating 
their approval of thoughts expressed 
on the program. But there's nothing 
altruistic about the middle and clos- 
ing commercials. 

Camera translates phrases: Al- 
though terms such as "lyric beauty 
of the ballet," "random textured ef- 
fects," and "the spirit of the dance 
crystallized in another fine Beautiblend 
Broadloom by C. H. Masland & Sons," 
may seem highly abstract, careful cam- 
era work translates the high-flown 
words into concrete examples on the 
product in use. 

Using the camera as a sales tool 
often is tricky. The agency explains. 
"You can't sell what the camera can't 
pick up, but we've learned a lot of 
the art of handling various types of car- 
pet. For textured patterns we use flat 
lighting, usually a 90 mm. lens so we 
can get real close, and keep the camera 
in constant motion so we can put across 
the feeling of fluidity." 

And, of course, the question of TV's 
lack of color often comes up. Sur- 
prisingly enough, an agency spokesman 
explained it this way to SPONSOR: 
"Although we use full color in our 
magazine ads, we have gotten excellent 
results with black-and-white TV. We 
have found that showing textures and 
patterns in black and white while giv- 
ing an oral description makes it easy 
for the housewife to imagine the car- 
peting in her own home setting. In 
fact, the lack of color stimulates her 
imagination as she mentally juggles 
various color combinations. Perhaps 
if you showed the carpeting in a spe- 
cific color, say red, she would not be 
able to fit it into her own setting." 

For those who might wish to study 
the various patterns at greater length, 
Masland uses TV to merchandise its 
advertising i